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Rippingilles stove


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Chatting to Jim MacDonald at Retford last week, thanking him for his recommendation of a Beatrice stove, and he mentioned that he'd seen a Rippingilles stove at Newark antiques market the previous week. Not having read Riddle of the Sands (I downloaded it straight away though) I'd never heard of Rippingilles, but having Googled a few pictures we decided that we had to go and have a look, and having looked, of course we bought it.

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If my information is correct, they were made in Birmingham by the Albion Lamp Company from the 1880s, primarily for the colonial market as gas was already becoming popular in England. There seem to have been myriad different models (looking both on t'internet and in my reproduction 1907 Army and Navy Catalogue). Ours is numbered 470. None of the others I've seen has the fancy cast side pieces, all being a plain box (as the shape of the burners would suggest). Amazingly, it appears never to have been used. Not only are the wicks pristine, but there is no trace or smell of paraffin in the tanks.

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I think the pot stands aren't original; in all the pictures where I can make it out they have flat plates, and you'd presumably need something solid to keep the heat in in order to use the oven.

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Hopefully it will be going into Singapore (PB's new project boat which I will have to leave him to tell you about... Carl'll like it)

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I have been lusting after a Rippingilles for years but all the ones I've seen have been either ridiculously priced or boxes of rust.

 

Edited to add: Proper old school can opener, too! :cheers:

Edited by carlt
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I have been lusting after a Rippingilles for years but all the ones I've seen have been either ridiculously priced or boxes of rust.

 

Edited to add: Proper old school can opener, too! :cheers:

Well it probably was ridiculously priced...

Tin opener came (boxed) from a jumble sale a couple of years ago.

 

Is that so you can throw the old one overboard?

:D

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Hi Sarah,

 

Is it possible that it was made overseas, say in India?

 

Over time a number of cast iron products were produced in Indian foundries with local embellishments added either for taste, a god, or luck. Certainly if the British market dropped and production stopped the Indian market would be supplied from a local foundry.

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That is a very nice stove Sarah.

 

I know you have said that the wicks are in pristine condition, but they will not last for ever and will eventually need replacing. I don't know if they actually stock them, but these people are probably your best bet :- http://www.base-camp.co.uk/ They are very knowledgeable and helpful people.

Edited by David Schweizer
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Hi Sarah,

 

Is it possible that it was made overseas, say in India?

 

Over time a number of cast iron products were produced in Indian foundries with local embellishments added either for taste, a god, or luck. Certainly if the British market dropped and production stopped the Indian market would be supplied from a local foundry.

An interesting thought, indeed. I shall have to investigate. But I don't think they would still be badged 'Rippingilles' in that case would they? And who in their right mind would import one back to England?

 

ed to add - also, the stove itself, apart from the top, isn't cast; only the stand and handles are.

That is a very nice stove Sarah.

 

I know you have said that the wicks are in pristine condition, but they will not last for ever and will eventually need replacing. I don't know if they actually stock them, but these people are probably your best bet :- http://www.base-camp.co.uk/ They are very knowledgeable and helpful people.

Indeed David, I've already used them. I think that's where we got the Monitor stove from and a Bialaddin lamp. Very good as you say.

Edited by Chertsey
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What a splendid find to add to your collection of paraffin driven things!

 

That reminds me although it's a bit :smiley_offtopic: - have you progressed any further with the paraffin fridge idea?

 

Richard

No, partly as the promised fridge never materialised. However, talking to various people suggests that even when purpose built and new paraffin fridges are not as good (i.e. as cold) as gas ones and present an ever present threat of filling the boat with soot if you turn your back on them. If a fridge materialises, though, I will hunt down a burner and see what happens.

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We had one on the Dutchman as there was only a two burner gas hob. Cooked scones in it, very tasty too, but we eventually moved it on. Interesting bit of kit though. Seem to recall we bought it from Hungerford, about £30 (and 30yrs ago!). Can't remember what we sold it for - not a lot.

 

Got a Crosse & Blackwell can opener that came from my Nan on the boat. More pre-historic than old school. Wooden handle too!

 

PS: Just back from France with 20 litres of Paraffin - 20 Euros! Better still - Alcohol for spirit stoves (smells and tasted like Calvados) 5 litres - 7 euros 90 cents! (Used in place of Meths). Suppose I'd better not drink it. Well, not much of it . . .

Edited by Derek R.
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Looks lovely - when built - 1940's?

1937, though the aft cabin is a later addition, as is the wheelhouse.

 

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I hope PB doesn't mind me posting pics of his new boat... I was going to leave it to him but have succumbed to temptation.

Edited by Chertsey
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1937, though the aft cabin is a later addition, as is the wheelhouse.

 

img_0190.jpg

 

I hope PB doesn't mind me posting pics of his new boat... I was going to leave it to him but have succumbed to temptation.

 

Ah - so that's why he's been a little quiet on here lately! Is that the one he found in Chichester or something different?

 

Looks absolutely fabulous! Just needs a petrol/paraffin Kelvin engine to go with the stove perhaps? So both boats are now 1937 build!

 

(What engine has it got just out of interest?)

 

Richard

 

Edited to say you don't need to answer that - I've just had a quick look at your blog which I hadn't done for quite a few months!

Edited by rjasmith
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Ah - so that's why he's been a little quiet on here lately! Is that the one he found in Chichester or something different?

 

Looks absolutely fabulous! Just needs a petrol/paraffin Kelvin engine to go with the stove perhaps? So both boats are now 1937 build!

 

(What engine has it got just out of interest?)

 

Richard

 

1950s Fordson; originally had a Morris petrol engine.

This is the Dunkirk Little Ship that is currently on the Broads but will shortly be going to Walton on the Naze, where she was built, to be our seaside holiday cottage.

 

Further off topic still (but I don't see the OP complaining) Singapore is the fifth boat we've owned and they have all had one-word names: Helyn, Andante, Warrior, Chertsey, Singapore. I wonder what the odds are of that.

 

ed. to change 'it' to 'she'.

Edited by Chertsey
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1950s Fordson; originally had a Morris petrol engine.

This is the Dunkirk Little Ship that is currently on the Broads but will shortly be going to Walton on the Naze, where she was built, to be our seaside holiday cottage.

 

Further off topic still (but I don't see the OP complaining) Singapore is the fifth boat we've owned and they have all had one-word names: Helyn, Andante, Warrior, Chertsey, Singapore. I wonder what the odds are of that.

 

ed. to change 'it' to 'she'.

 

Wow - I've just looked "Singapore" up in my battered copy of "The nine days of Dunkirk" by David Divine. Both Singapores I and II are mentioned in the book's boat lists and there is a bit of text in chapter 14 (June 2nd 1940) about an incident concerning one of them but it doesn't say which. Have you got this book?

 

Richard

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Wow - I've just looked "Singapore" up in my battered copy of "The nine days of Dunkirk" by David Divine. Both Singapores I and II are mentioned in the book's boat lists and there is a bit of text in chapter 14 (June 2nd 1940) about an incident concerning one of them but it doesn't say which. Have you got this book?

 

Richard

No, not got that book. How frustrating not to know which one it was though.

This is Singapore II; there was some talk of them being sister ships but it seems most likely that the I and II (and, apparently, III) were for Thames registration purposes.

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No, not got that book. How frustrating not to know which one it was though.

This is Singapore II; there was some talk of them being sister ships but it seems most likely that the I and II (and, apparently, III) were for Thames registration purposes.

There are pictures (small) of both in "The Little Ships of Dunkirk".

 

Both were built by the same Walton on Naze builder, 3 years apart.

 

Some lovely pictures and some info on the surveyor's website.

 

Clicky

 

I notice that the tabernacle is still in place...Any plans to return her to rag power?

 

Edited yet again...Whereabouts on the Broads is she? I'm up there to fiddle with my boat, at half term, and wouldn't mind a nose.

Edited by carlt
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Edited yet again...Whereabouts on the Broads is she? I'm up there to fiddle with my boat, at half term, and wouldn't mind a nose.

At Thorpe near Norwich. We'll be going up on the 29th prior to taking her to Lowestoft where we'll be joined by someone from Frank Halls to take her to Walton on the 3rd. Gives us a few days to potter about and get to know her. PB did PM you a while back in case you were interested but got no reply...

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No, not got that book. How frustrating not to know which one it was though.

This is Singapore II; there was some talk of them being sister ships but it seems most likely that the I and II (and, apparently, III) were for Thames registration purposes.

 

As the passage in the book about whichever Singapore it was is just a couple of paragraphs, I thought I would type it in here in case a few of us are interested.

 

On p. 213/4 Admiral Taylor on a boat called White Wing is describing the scene on the penultimate day of the evacuation (June 2nd 1940):-

 

'While they were still filing back to the beach and the dawn was breaking with uncomfortable brilliance, we found one of our stragglers - a Navy whaler. We told her people to come aboard but they said that there was a white motor-boat aground and they would have to fetch off her crew. They went in, and we waited. It was my longest wait - ever. For various reasons they were terribly slow. When they found the captain of the motor-boat they stood and argued with him and he wouldn't come off anyway - damned plucky chap.

 

The white motor-boat on the beach was Singapore. She had run aground at 1.30 in the morning. She eventually refloated on the rising tide and left with three French officers in addition to her crew. On the way Sub-Lieutenant J. W. Pratt, R.N.V.R., who was in command of her, picked up two British soldiers who were "floating around". Wine from the Frenchmen's water bottles brought them back to consciousness. Subsequently he took in tow three lifeboats which he found in mid-Channel, but eventually his engines broke down and he was himself taken in tow by Kitcat.'

 

Finally there's a brief mention of Singapore (but not which one again!) on the very last day, June 3rd, on p. 217. The time is sunrise.

 

'In the [Dunkirk] harbour there were only wrecks and the French personnel ship Rouen, still aground, still waiting with a desparate patience for the rising tide. On the Malo beach the motor-boat Singapore waited also.'

 

I wonder if these two stories relate to the same Singapore or are about each one separately! The two boats are only distinguished in the book by their entries as I and II in the appendix listing the ships/boats that took part.

 

Richard

Edited by rjasmith
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I can't get onto the ADLS website (it's a bit useless anyway) but Steve Truss, who presumably got the info from there, says that Sub Lieut. F.E. Greenfell was in charge of Singapore II, suggesting that the boat under the command of Sub-Lieutenant J. W. Pratt would have been Singapore I - unless they swapped about during the operation? I really know very little about it :blush: , my knowledge having been almost entirely gained from reading Paul Gallico's Snowgoose many years ago. I think I might be about to learn more though.

 

Thank you for typing the quote out Richard.

Edited by Chertsey
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