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About rjasmith

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  • Gender
  • Location
    Wey and Arun Country

Previous Fields

  • Occupation
    Semi retired engineer
  • Boat Name
    Shilla (just a shell at the mo!)
  • Boat Location
    In the garden!

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  1. Re bit in red above - I wish I had a gramophone record I could play to say this! You can afford to read "these codes"! Just go to Manchester City Library website and find their link to their online reference library. Search for British Standards. A link to British Stds online (BSOL) will come up. Use that, MCL pay the BSOL licence (bless them!). Free for you and you don't even have to be an MCL member. Once in BSOL search using the std no (eg 13240 and perhaps, another time, 8511 -the CoP for "Stoves in Boats" of which the Soliftec sketch is a precis). You will then get the titles of stds having this number, listed. Choose the one you're interested in and click the little icon on the far right (quick view). Eventually the full text of the std will appear as a read only .pdf. You'll find 13240 very technical but 8511 is quite practical and readable and IMHO gives all the answers! Morso and Aarrow were represented at a high level in the drafting of 8511 back in 2010 and I believe all their 13240 compliant stoves meet the <100°C to the hearth requirement but it's good that you've asked the mfr in your case, it's what I did and so I can use the not less than 12mm non combustible hearth under my stove. Other hearth arrangements are given in 8511 and it now accepts that a 125mm constructional hearth is probably the least popular solution for a boat!!! Richard edit to add;- Actually I couldn't remember what stove you said you were looking at originally so I've just re read your OP. As "The Biscuits" has already pointed out, your manual already says that the stove can use a 12mm non combustible hearth so therefore it doesn't raise hearth temp by more than 100°C in the 13240 test.
  2. Carbon Monoxide alarms for boats

    No need to spend any money to read a BSI or ISO etc standard you know! Just go to Manchester City Libraries (MCL) Online Reference library (ideally you should become a member as I have and (I think) uniquely MCL offers library membership to ANY UK resident). From there they provide a link to British Stds Online (BSOL) (MCL pays for the BSOL access licence! Thank you MCL!). Enter the Std no of your choice in the BSOL search box and when the titles come up you'll see a little icon on the far right of it (Quick View). Click this and a read only .pdf will come up of the Std's full text. I've just had a look at BS EN 50291-2 and the paragraphs relating to Recreational Craft are in deed interesting and definitely relate to salty boats ie the alarm must stand up to all sorts of vibration, heel angles, crashing about in waves, salt water splashing about, even non interference with marine VHF etc etc. Have a read for yourself! Richard
  3. Kelvin TASC 8 RR 1200 RPM

    Here's a youtube showing John and Andy (of Seaward Eng) starting up a TBSC8 Richard
  4. Did Lucy ever get rebuilt/restored?

    Excellent news! I'd been wondering about this recently after obtaining an old copy of the WACT magazine Wey South (Spring 2000) which had a photo on the front cover of various Southern Canals Assoc folks on a visit to the W & A canal. Pete Boyce was in the picture amongst them. Some years later we went to a presentation he gave locally on the recovery of Lucy and the plans to restore her. Richard
  5. "Vintage Marine Engines for Narrow Boats"

    Martyn, Thanks very much for that long and detailed response! (Greenie issued!) I used to be fairly well versed in all of RCD1 and have read through RCD2 but without retaining the detail quite so well I fear. At the time of its approval in late 2013/early 2014 I was in contact with Mike Clarke in Belgium who I had once met at one of Kevin Whittle's vintage engine rallies (the one at Shardlow in 2004). I still have his emailed understanding of the new difficulties RCD2 would present when it was clear that his words that went into RCD1 were to be removed. I have since then always stuck with his advice on this specific point. Are you aware of what his clause used to say? I could look it up and send it to you if you're interested. Basically it exempted any engine that had been placed on the EU market prior to the coming into force of the RCD1 amendment that first introduced emissions requirements (approved in 2004 but in force from, I think, Jan 2006). Mike even produced an "Engine Declaration of Exemption" document quoting his clause that the builder could sign to go with the Annex XV Declaration of Compliance for all other aspects of the boat build! All this now can't work with RCD2 of course. I am however, from your last post, encouraged to study RCD2 again carefully to better understand how the clauses you have reminded us about (many of which were also in RCD1 but maybe subtly differently worded) can now be used by vintage engine fanatics. Richard
  6. "Vintage Marine Engines for Narrow Boats"

    Martyn, Thanks for that, as I said, I thought the old "historic watercraft" stuff might still be helpful here but I don't think those clauses have changed significantly between RCD1 and RCD2. Without another careful study of Mike Clarke's "emissions matrix" sheet again I'm sure there were problems for fitting old engines in new narrow boats under RCD1 that caused him (together with 2 or 3 others) to invent his special clause and get it approved by both the EU Parliament and the Commission. He was even delighted when the Commission actually "improved" his words a bit! When I asked him specifically on this point back in 2013 he was adamant that with his clause removed the situation was radically changed and would be a significant problem for boat builders trying to fit old engines in new boats after RCD2 became mandatory. It's good to hear you say that UK and Netherland boat builders still have no problems these days. Can you point us at any names of UK boat firms that you deal with that are still fitting old engines? I suppose it's all down to whether a present day welded steel narrow boat with appropriate cabin shape configuration can be interpreted as an "original historic watercraft etc etc (words as above)". Richard
  7. "Vintage Marine Engines for Narrow Boats"

    Alan, I think the simple answer is "no not really" but I'll do my best! The CB article is in the Sept 2017 issue which anyone can read online by now if that helps. The article doesn't go into great detail about vintage engines other than to remind us that emissions limits were first introduced in the 2004 amendment to the old 1998 RCD (RCD1) but RCD2 has now introduced the tighter 2010 USA limits for boat engines. It doesn't say that the difference between RCD1 and RCD2 is that a very significant but tiny clause in the 2004 RCD1 amendment put in by Mike Clarke (see post 17 above) was removed in RCD2 despite his strong protest to the (British) Rapporteur Malcolm Harbour. This clause specifically exempted from the requirement to meet the 2004 emissions limits any engine that had been built prior to 2005 (or 2006 - I can never remember which year it was!) This is what defines a "vintage or historic engine" in RCD1. Under RCD1 there were complicated interpretations of which types of boat this could be applied to (ie historic boat, historic replica new boat, historic engine, historic replica engine etc) and to clarify it Mike Clarke produced an "emissions matrix" sheet which used to exist on the British Marine website but will undoubtedly have been taken down now. (I still have a copy). With the removal of Mike's clause (RCD2 has repealed the old RCD1 and its 2004 amendment) the situation has radically changed and the simple case is now that all new build boats must be fitted with an emissions (2010 standard) compliant engine. I have no idea but perhaps there is still some room for manoeuvre via a different format of "emissions matrix" vis-a-vis new build historic replica boats plus of course if you build your own boat you can still do what you like and ignore RCD2 but not sell for 5 years. Back in 2013 there were suggestions of a get around, often favoured in Holland apparently, that would get a new boat built commercially and fitted with a vintage engine. This was where the buyer would commission a boat fitted with a compliant engine at first. The sale would then proceed with full RCD legality but the boat would stay where it was at the yard while the compliant engine was removed and a non compliant "vintage" engine fitted to the customers choice! The boat was now no longer RCD compliant but was what the owner originally wanted and the engine change was simply a "repair" subsequent to the legal new boat sale! If you read the CB article, Ross Wombwell clearly points out that RCD2 will no longer allow this as the engine change is classed as a "Major Craft Conversion" and it is a new responsibility for owners under RCD2 to have any such conversion rechecked for continued RCD2 compliance. This last show stopper hadn't previously occurred to me I have to say! Of course none of this stuff applies to boats with existing old engines that were built, either prior to or during the RCD1 era (1998 to January 18 2017). Not quite sure what happens if you change an engine in a previously RCD1 compliant boat for another non compliant engine from now on!!!! Richard
  8. "Vintage Marine Engines for Narrow Boats"

    Mike, No this bit is still in there as before but the definition of "built by the owner for his own use" has had the word "predominantly" added in front of it! Mike Clarke in Belgium (the boat law expert I occasionally contact) interprets this as meaning that building from a bare hull is still OK but building from a sailaway might not be. Ross Wombwell agrees and elaborates further on this in the Canal Boat article which was in the Sept 2017 issue. It should be available now in the Back Numbers section on the CB website for anyone who wants more detail. Strangely this earth shattering fact seems to be passing everyone by! I wrote lots of stuff in various posts about the new RCD (now called RCD2) when it was originally approved back in 2013 but it didn't seem to cause much of a stir then either! Richard
  9. "Vintage Marine Engines for Narrow Boats"

    Mick, Having got a phone no for Kevin Whittle and having not seen anything of him for a very long time I just picked up the phone and spoke to him a few mins ago! He's still in the land of the living and has received your email - I gather he is, just now replying to you and presumably you will get your copy of his book. Without wishing to start a great discussion on Vintage Engines and the EU, I'm not sure if you're thinking of buying a new boat with a vintage engine or trying to get a used one with a vintage engine in it already. The latter option will be fine of course but since last January the new version of the RCD became mandatory and now makes fitting a new boat with a vintage engine rather difficult so if following this option you will need to check this out carefully. A recent article in Canal Boat magazine written with the help of Ross Wombwell (British Marine Technical Manager) has some details of this. Richard
  10. Shower pump switch

    Just a small correction to this from my experience of using library membership to access the BSOL website to read BS or ISO standards. As you say this facility used to be available quite widely via County Libraries. Anyone can join the County Library for free provided they are resident in that county or in an adjacent county or have an accommodation address there. Once a member, you could either access BSOL online from anywhere by logging on with your library membership id or physically visit a local library and log on using one of their in house pcs. Unfortunately many if not most County Libraries have now dropped this service following price hikes by BSOL for the access licence combined with County Councils having to cut costs in the library service. Over the years I lost access from Surrey, then West Sussex, then Hampshire and finally Cambridgeshire. These four counties have even removed access via their in house pcs. Manchester City Library however stands out as a splendid exception! First of all, they allow ANY UK resident to be a member of MCL and you can join online. Secondly, to use BSOL via their website doesn't seem to require you to log on so I suppose it isn't really necessary to join. I just thought I should join in case the number of members might be linked to securing library service funds or something. Richard
  11. Have you tried John Opie's (link here)? Richard
  12. Corrugated flexible ducting

    Try this ebay link for split conduit or this for non split. Various diameters down to 6.5mm and various length quantities can be selected. Richard
  13. RCD cable requirements

    Really good to see a few more folks using the Manchester City Library link to access BSOL to read ISO and BS standards!! I'm pretty sure it was me that was the first Canalworlder to find that MCL were one of the last remaining libraries that still subsidised this arrangement, and better still, allowed free access for all ALL UK residents! Since finding them 2 or 3 years ago I've mentioned it on here as much as I can. The more of us that use their facility (which presumably their website managers will be recording somewhere) must help to try to prevent MCL dropping the facility to save costs. Over time I've been a member of Surrey Libraries, West Sussex Libraries, Hampshire libraries and finally Cambridgeshire Libraries (don't ask how I swung that one as I don't live close enough to Cambridgeshire really, however a certain Moomin of this parish was able to help me!). One by one the above County libraries responded to austerity cuts by dropping their BSOL link licence which caused me to have to move to the next. In the end I tried nearly every other UK County but the problem of non county residence (I live in W Sussex) always got in the way until I found that MCL didn't require it! Another advantage of looking at Stds via BSOL is that you can see ALL issues of them until they are withdrawn. Also you can peruse new draft issues so that a new change being considered may not come as such a surprise! This is rather better than just Googling for the Std number, finding it on a Far East etc website but not knowing whether it has become out of date. Don't forget that another (cheap but not free) way to read an individual Std on paper is to order a loan copy using an Inter Library loan from the British Library. This will cost a few quid per item when arranged via your local library. While you have this copy you must be careful not to infringe copyright law. Richard
  14. Trianco Solid Fuel Burner for scrap.

    Sorry - my wording misled you a bit perhaps. The GEC thing was of course made by Mr Weinstock's famous company now very long gone! Ours was a throw out by an aged uncle who had finally stopped lighting coal fires in favour of gas fired CH. It was probably a product of the late 50's or early 60's and is certainly no longer available itself. The ones that are now available are either the Grenadier or the Phoenix which I found via Google just now but have never tried to use. They look similar to the old GEC thing apart from looking far less solidly built! I'm sure they will work just as well as the GEC job but probably wont last as long as ours did. It would undoubtedly still be working now if it hadn't suffered from wifely operator error! Richard
  15. Trianco Solid Fuel Burner for scrap.

    Ours was the TRG60 gravity fed type - amazing that they're still available new! Our method of lighting was pretty foolproof as we had a fairly ancient electric device made by GEC which was like a hot air gun on steroids. Just poke the nozzle end of it into the unlit anthracite through the open fire door and switch on. About 10 mins later a large area of the firebed would be glowing nicely so time to start the boiler fan, remove the giant hot air gun and shut the fire door. Simples as the meercat says! The GEC gun was also wonderful for starting proper charcoal barbecues! One day it met its end when SWMBO had a go with it instead of me. She shoved it into the anthracite too deeply, beyond the high temp capable steel nozzle. The nozzle was entirely burnt off and the electric element tube and ceramic former inside were trashed. Luckily we were about to move to our present house and a new experience with automatic pressure jet oil fired boilers! Recently I have seen adverts for a modern version of the GEC gun if anyone might want one. Perhaps a bit of Googling might find them. Richard