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Fridge Behaviour


noether

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3 minutes ago, Tony Brooks said:

 

That is good, but what about heat?

 

I would point out that a known effect of sulphur dioxide is that after a while you  stop being able to smell it.

 

I know access is difficult, but how would you cope when miles away from help?

 

Exactly.

 

I've just been and had a feel around as best I could, and I couldn't feel any heat from them, although I did bang my head and get a spider in my hair, so not an entirely wasted trip. 

 

I don't seem to be articulating very effectively on this thread: I will never be 'miles away from help', I'm living on a marina. I have never and will never take the boat out. At this exact moment, life circumstances are such that I can't just sell the boat (not least because my wife is away, and I don't expect she'd be too happy), but as soon as I am in a position to do so, I will. Is that ok? 

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Just now, noether said:

 

I've just been and had a feel around as best I could, and I couldn't feel any heat from them, although I did bang my head and get a spider in my hair, so not an entirely wasted trip. 

 

I don't seem to be articulating very effectively on this thread: I will never be 'miles away from help', I'm living on a marina. I have never and will never take the boat out. At this exact moment, life circumstances are such that I can't just sell the boat (not least because my wife is away, and I don't expect she'd be too happy), but as soon as I am in a position to do so, I will. Is that ok? 

 

I understand but you will save yourself  a lot of money if you were willing to get to know your boat enough to do some simple DIY testing.

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10 minutes ago, noether said:

 

 

I don't imagine him an expert, but he might have a degree in electrical engineering for all I know. I do know that I told him initially it was a problem with the batteries, but when I described what had me worried, he was more concerned about the fridge being on the fritz than anything else. 

The reason we have all given you the advice we have, is because it's very much worth investigating whether it's the fridge or the batteries/charging.  A 12v fridge costs £500.  You really don't want to be forking that out to find out the original fridge is fine.  There's a simple thing you can do - put a meter on the battery terminals and on the wires going into the fridge.  I get that it's awkward but that's sometimes how things are.  Getting to the wires behind the fridge cannot be that hard.  If you're feeling really lazy, then buy one of these:  https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dual-USB-Car-Charger-Built/dp/B01N5I0J92/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?adgrpid=115344935707&dchild=1&gclid=CjwKCAjw4qCKBhAVEiwAkTYsPCA4qxcpmo0VfKy99v3Wu8BPKHEQIoWIb-TRNnX4N2ohTBQNP-6UHhoCWWgQAvD_BwE&hvadid=476465497360&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9045469&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=b&hvrand=17564207078868035315&hvtargid=kwd-305192881801&hydadcr=6846_1812858&keywords=voltmeter+car+lighter&qid=1632129235&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUExQ0pBUkxTVEZJSTZGJmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwNzU4NTk5OE9VNklLMkhTUU9QJmVuY3J5cHRlZEFkSWQ9QTAwMTM0MzEzNFhCSUdFNzFVQjhIJndpZGdldE5hbWU9c3BfYXRmJmFjdGlvbj1jbGlja1JlZGlyZWN0JmRvTm90TG9nQ2xpY2s9dHJ1ZQ==

 

It will give you a better idea than you have now.  You can even watch to see what the volts do when the compressor kicks in.

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2 minutes ago, Tony Brooks said:

 

I understand but you will save yourself  a lot of money if you were willing to get to know your boat enough to do some simple DIY testing.

 

Or I could just ask you and you could scare the bejesus out of me instead 😉

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9 minutes ago, doratheexplorer said:

 

I have to wonder:  why did you buy a boat?

 

(Honest question)

 

I don't mind the question at all, but it is either a long answer, or an incomplete answer. 

 

Short version: had been living abroad, stuck because of virus, needed somewhere to stay, didn't want to rent, wife needs to be away. Bought the boat as an act of desperation. Wife likes (liked) it, I do not. And it's not as if I hate it utterly, either: it's just not feasible for me that I can live like this for very long. I work every day, and the constant maintenance of filling the water tank, emptying the cassette, the gas, banging my head every 8 minutes, etc, is really starting to wear me down. And usually my wife is like my 'ambassador to the world', she's outdoorsy and goes out and talks to people and she likes finding out things about diesel or lighting fires or whathaveyou. I don't. I like to sit with my computer and drink tea and read history books. 

 

As for ordering from amazon, again, I'd need to get somewhere to pick it up, and by the time all that's done, I might as well wait for the engineer to have a look. 

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1 hour ago, MtB said:

 

Do beware of assumptions. Also beware of that other effect, that anyone who knows even slightly more than you about any given subject can easily appear to you to be an 'expert' in that subject, when really they are not.

 

However I dont think anybody on this thread has given advice beyond either their own personal experience (where they have it) or technical experise (where they posess it).

 

Indeed where advice has been given based on personal experience it appears to align with what those with technical expertise seem to be saying.

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40 minutes ago, noether said:

As for ordering from amazon, again, I'd need to get somewhere to pick it up, and by the time all that's done, I might as well wait for the engineer to have a look. 

 

Probably sensible, under the circumstances.

 

Having said that, I have had stuff from Amazon delivered to relatives houses, my work office, as well as my home..... so I'd guess you could have stuff delivered to the marina, (but maybe not). I'm surprised the marina doesn't have a little shop/chandlery where you could buy a DC meter.

 

Given that you cant sell the boat in the very short term, it would be worth making the effort to get a meter, as it is one of those things that helps people here to give more specific advice. Something as simple as a voltage at the batteries, or an amp reading from the cables going in and out of the batteries, could rule out all the doom and gloom of the possibility of exploding batteries, and help focus on some other cause.

 

This looks like the one I've had for about 10 years. It's helped me diagnose or rule out a whole load of stuff over the years - it's also handy for use at home and on the car:

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/UT204A-Digital-Handheld-Multimeter-Voltmeter/dp/B00LSL1PZE/ref=sr_1_27?dchild=1&keywords=uni-t&qid=1632132653&qsid=257-3236854-9792911&sr=8-27&sres=B00O1Q2HOQ%2CB01M0J5DP7%2CB07MVVY1ST%2CB08NDLYLY3%2CB0753FY711%2CB07PRTFFVC%2CB01LZ86T94%2CB01J3GFPV0%2CB07QJXJ4RH%2CB01LXLPWE2%2CB07LGVWKNS%2CB01LZK0IGJ%2CB08FCD7R9P%2CB008US2700%2CB07CLKJX18%2CB0789FN62W%2CB071Y2Y5PL%2CB06XV5B42V%2CB07CCMMCY8%2CB092ZB7678&srpt=ELECTRIC_CIRCUIT_TESTING_DEVICE

 

As a matter of interest, since the mechanic from the marina did his stuff, (inspection and fiddling with the charger), has the fridge been working OK, or has it defrosted again a few times? Whilst I appreciate you dont have an hour to sit and listen to a fridge, have you sensed it "turning on and off", in a way that might suggest the thermostat is doing it's stuff? I think mine hums for about 15 minutes, then is quiet for 15 minutes, and so on, so the timing would be of that kind of order.

 

Rather than assuming your batteries are knackered and about to explode, (which is always a possibility for all of us :( ), I am leaning towards an issue with the power getting to the fridge.

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1 hour ago, noether said:

 

Or I could just ask you and you could scare the bejesus out of me instead 😉

 

If I were to try to help you in person, my approach would be to show you exactly what test I was doing and explain why and what results I expected. From that result I would explain how I determined the next test and so the procedure would go on with plenty of opportunity for you to ask any questions so you have things clear in your mind. Others that I have helped in this way can attest as to how effective my approach is re their own understanding.

 

Without any test results, there is no way an even semi-reliable diagnosis can be made. This is why my only contribution to this topic until today was to point out that the voltage you quoted may not mean what some here seem to think it may mean.

 

If I knew where all the electrical kit was on your boat and exactly what it is then, as long as you were willing, I and several other on here could talk you through some voltage tests that would not have to be done at the batteries. But we don't so can't. It is probably best that you await the engineer

 

As long as the batteries are not completely on their last legs, and the  smell-feel test suggests they are not, then there is nothing to be scared of apart from the always present danger of a professional misdiagnosis with associated costs or the loss of food in the fridge.

 

In no particular order the problem could be batteries, a wiring fault, a charger fault leading to a battery problem, or as the chap said a fridge fault. That is all that can be said at present.

 

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29 minutes ago, Richard10002 said:

Having said that, I have had stuff from Amazon delivered to relatives houses, my work office, as well as my home..... so I'd guess you could have stuff delivered to the marina, (but maybe not). 

 

As a matter of interest, since the mechanic from the marina did his stuff, (inspection and fiddling with the charger), has the fridge been working OK, or has it defrosted again a few times? Whilst I appreciate you dont have an hour to sit and listen to a fridge, have you sensed it "turning on and off", in a way that might suggest the thermostat is doing it's stuff? I think mine hums for about 15 minutes, then is quiet for 15 minutes, and so on, so the timing would be of that kind of order.

 

 

Have asked before at the marina and they said they don't accept deliveries for moorers. I could have something delivered to my sister, but that would mean getting to a train station (3 hours walk or £20 taxi), getting on a train for an hour or so, walking to her house, getting all the way back.....etc. 

 

The fridge seems to actually have been working peachy since the chap from the marina, but, it was actually kinda ok before that too, although I wouldn't be surprised if I find the contents defrosted tomorrow morning. Tbh if it weren't for this thread, I wouldn't have thought much of it if I'd asked the marina guy first. 

 

 

13 minutes ago, Tony Brooks said:

 

If I were to try to help you in person, my approach would be to show you exactly what test I was doing and explain why and what results I expected. From that result I would explain how I determined the next test and so the procedure would go on with plenty of opportunity for you to ask any questions so you have things clear in your mind. Others that I have helped in this way can attest as to how effective my approach is re their own understanding.

 

Without any test results, there is no way an even semi-reliable diagnosis can be made. This is why my only contribution to this topic until today was to point out that the voltage you quoted may not mean what some here seem to think it may mean.

 

If I knew where all the electrical kit was on your boat and exactly what it is then, as long as you were willing, I and several other on here could talk you through some voltage tests that would not have to be done at the batteries. But we don't so can't. It is probably best that you await the engineer

 

As long as the batteries are not completely on their last legs, and the  smell-feel test suggests they are not, then there is nothing to be scared of apart from the always present danger of a professional misdiagnosis with associated costs or the loss of food in the fridge.

 

In no particular order the problem could be batteries, a wiring fault, a charger fault leading to a battery problem, or as the chap said a fridge fault. That is all that can be said at present.

 

 

I appreciate it, and I'm sure you have a great deal of expertise. Back many moons ago I used to fix computer networks, and often as not, a problem would be caused by someone who didn't know what they're doing (like me in this situation) trying to 'fix' a problem that often didn't exist - they would see a loose ethernet cable, think 'oh, this end should be plugged in to something', plug it in to the nearby patch panel, causing a broadcast storm that brought down the whole network. I think it is healthy to be wary of amateurs trying to fix things on their own. 

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4 minutes ago, noether said:

 

Have asked before at the marina and they said they don't accept deliveries for moorers. I could have something delivered to my sister, but that would mean getting to a train station (3 hours walk or £20 taxi), getting on a train for an hour or so, walking to her house, getting all the way back.....etc. 

 

The fridge seems to actually have been working peachy since the chap from the marina, but, it was actually kinda ok before that too, although I wouldn't be surprised if I find the contents defrosted tomorrow morning. Tbh if it weren't for this thread, I wouldn't have thought much of it if I'd asked the marina guy first. 

 

 

 

I appreciate it, and I'm sure you have a great deal of expertise. Back many moons ago I used to fix computer networks, and often as not, a problem would be caused by someone who didn't know what they're doing (like me in this situation) trying to 'fix' a problem that often didn't exist - they would see a loose ethernet cable, think 'oh, this end should be plugged in to something', plug it in to the nearby patch panel, causing a broadcast storm that brought down the whole network. I think it is healthy to be wary of amateurs trying to fix things on their own. 

 

Amazon deliver to lockers and post offices. If you have either nearby.

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1 minute ago, noether said:

 

Have asked before at the marina and they said they don't accept deliveries for moorers. I could have something delivered to my sister, but that would mean getting to a train station (3 hours walk or £20 taxi), getting on a train for an hour or so, walking to her house, getting all the way back.....etc. 

 

The fridge seems to actually have been working peachy since the chap from the marina, but, it was actually kinda ok before that too, although I wouldn't be surprised if I find the contents defrosted tomorrow morning. Tbh if it weren't for this thread, I wouldn't have thought much of it if I'd asked the marina guy first. 

 

 

 

I appreciate it, and I'm sure you have a great deal of expertise. Back many moons ago I used to fix computer networks, and often as not, a problem would be caused by someone who didn't know what they're doing (like me in this situation) trying to 'fix' a problem that often didn't exist - they would see a loose ethernet cable, think 'oh, this end should be plugged in to something', plug it in to the nearby patch panel, causing a broadcast storm that brought down the whole network. I think it is healthy to be wary of amateurs trying to fix things on their own. 

 

You see, if we knew where your domestic electrical distribution board was and had a photo, we could explain how to set up a meter and exactly where to touch the probes. No need to get anywhere near the batteries at that point. Then turn the charger off and run say the shower pump and water pump for a few minutes. Put the probes in place and take a reading, I would expect it to be up to around 13V or lower. Then turn the charger on and repeat. I would hope the reading would jump up to at least 13.6V and ideally over 14V (say about 14.2 to 14.4V).

 

From those readings we could infer how well  charged the batteries are and the state of them, if the charger is working as it should. If all those readings are as one would hope, then you rule out a lot of possibilities and are left with a potential wiring fault or a faulty fridge. If the readings are not as expected then a new test would have to be sorted out.

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23 minutes ago, noether said:

 

Have asked before at the marina and they said they don't accept deliveries for moorers. I could have something delivered to my sister, but that would mean getting to a train station (3 hours walk or £20 taxi), getting on a train for an hour or so, walking to her house, getting all the way back.....etc. 

 

I got an email from Amazon the other day telling me about their pick up locations. A whole variety of nearby shops, including the post office. I dont know where you are moored, but it's possible you may not be too far from a pick up location?

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=201911190

 

23 minutes ago, noether said:

 

The fridge seems to actually have been working peachy since the chap from the marina, but, it was actually kinda ok before that too,...

 

Yes... but then it wasnt OK, then the marina guy tweaked your charger, then it's been OK.

 

Your batteries may have reached the point where they weren't charged enough to provide the voltage needed by the fridge, and couldn't get the charged to provide it, and now they can get the charge, and can provide the voltage.

 

23 minutes ago, noether said:

although I wouldn't be surprised if I find the contents defrosted tomorrow morning....

 

always a possibility :( 

 

23 minutes ago, noether said:

Tbh if it weren't for this thread, I wouldn't have thought much of it if I'd asked the marina guy first. 

 

In fairness, if those suggesting the possibility of doom and gloom had had the opportunity to look at your system, they may have ruled out the doom and gloom fairly quickly. Remote diagnosis, with very little info is always going to make some err on the ultra cautious side. 

 

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40 minutes ago, Richard10002 said:

 

I got an email from Amazon the other day telling me about their pick up locations. A whole variety of nearby shops, including the post office. I dont know where you are moored, but it's possible you may not be too far from a pick up location?

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=201911190

 

 

Yes... but then it wasnt OK, then the marina guy tweaked your charger, then it's been OK.

 

Your batteries may have reached the point where they weren't charged enough to provide the voltage needed by the fridge, and couldn't get the charged to provide it, and now they can get the charge, and can provide the voltage.

 

In fairness, if those suggesting the possibility of doom and gloom had had the opportunity to look at your system, they may have ruled out the doom and gloom fairly quickly. Remote diagnosis, with very little info is always going to make some err on the ultra cautious side. 

 

 

Thank you, although I'd be very surprised if there was an amazon pick-up location in walking distance, there isn't a post office or a shop for miles around that I'm aware of. 

 

"Your batteries may have reached the point where they weren't charged enough to provide the voltage needed by the fridge, and couldn't get the charged to provide it, and now they can get the charge, and can provide the voltage."

 

I've actually just seen the guy from the marina, and this is pretty much what he said when we talked about it. 

 

I don't mind the doom and gloom, I understand and appreciate that people are trying to help me, there's just not really a lot I can do about it at the moment. Ordinarily my wife would deal with this and go off and find somebody who knows what they're talking about, she's the 'front facing side of the business' (I'm money acquisition and heavy lifting), and as pleasant a distraction as it is chatting to people on here, the whole 'boat thing' is just really making me miserable now, there's always some problem that needs addressing or you can't eat, sleep, bathe, breathe, etc. And when you talk to people about it, they just shrug and say "That's boats". 

 

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3 minutes ago, noether said:

 

Thank you, although I'd be very surprised if there was an amazon pick-up location in walking distance, there isn't a post office or a shop for miles around that I'm aware of. 

 

"Your batteries may have reached the point where they weren't charged enough to provide the voltage needed by the fridge, and couldn't get the charged to provide it, and now they can get the charge, and can provide the voltage."

 

I've actually just seen the guy from the marina, and this is pretty much what he said when we talked about it. 

 

I don't mind the doom and gloom, I understand and appreciate that people are trying to help me, there's just not really a lot I can do about it at the moment. Ordinarily my wife would deal with this and go off and find somebody who knows what they're talking about, she's the 'front facing side of the business' (I'm money acquisition and heavy lifting), and as pleasant a distraction as it is chatting to people on here, the whole 'boat thing' is just really making me miserable now, there's always some problem that needs addressing or you can't eat, sleep, bathe, breathe, etc. And when you talk to people about it, they just shrug and say "That's boats". 

 

 

Boats are complex, especially modern ones where the owners really want the facilities of shore based living. You not only need the mains supply and work out how to provide it, but you need all the 12/24 volt systems and a means of getting the boat moving. If someone just likes living on the water, they may be better off if they got a static houseboat like at least one marina is promoting, or a new build that has none of the 12v stuff and no engine. That way, the systems are much like a house. I think the houseboats I mention even have a proper sewerage connection.

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13 minutes ago, noether said:

 

Thank you, although I'd be very surprised if there was an amazon pick-up location in walking distance, there isn't a post office or a shop for miles around that I'm aware of. 

 

"Your batteries may have reached the point where they weren't charged enough to provide the voltage needed by the fridge, and couldn't get the charged to provide it, and now they can get the charge, and can provide the voltage."

 

I've actually just seen the guy from the marina, and this is pretty much what he said when we talked about it. 

 

I don't mind the doom and gloom, I understand and appreciate that people are trying to help me, there's just not really a lot I can do about it at the moment. Ordinarily my wife would deal with this and go off and find somebody who knows what they're talking about, she's the 'front facing side of the business' (I'm money acquisition and heavy lifting), and as pleasant a distraction as it is chatting to people on here, the whole 'boat thing' is just really making me miserable now, there's always some problem that needs addressing or you can't eat, sleep, bathe, breathe, etc. And when you talk to people about it, they just shrug and say "That's boats". 

 

I understand your issues with boat life, not everyone loves it enough to be happy to live with  the annoying bits, power, water, bogs, banging your head etc. Fair play to you and I hope you get sorted soon.

 

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5 minutes ago, tree monkey said:

I understand your issues with boat life, not everyone loves it enough to be happy to live with  the annoying bits, power, water, bogs, banging your head etc. Fair play to you and I hope you get sorted soon.

 

 

Thank you, I really appreciate that. If circumstances had been different it might have worked out, but I was getting desperate, it's my own fault (can't even blame wife for this one, pretty much all on me), and people who say "just sell the boat" probably have access to a car, money, maybe a house, family they can stay with etc, I have none of those things. So, onwards and upwards. Or die in a fog of sulphur dioxide. Either way, it's all gravy, and I will leave the canal life to those more worthy of its challenges. 

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52 minutes ago, noether said:

Either way, it's all gravy, and I will leave the canal life to those more worthy of its challenges. 

 

Except, living permanently in a marina you won't have experienced ANY of the good stuff "canal life" offers.

 

Marina life is pretty grim in comparison to living out and about on the cut, in my personal experience.

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1 hour ago, MtB said:

 

Except, living permanently in a marina you won't have experienced ANY of the good stuff "canal life" offers.

 

Marina life is pretty grim in comparison to living out and about on the cut, in my personal experience.

 

This was my concern before we moved on the boat, I said to my wife that my worry was that there would be an agglomeration of irritations that would make it a miserable experience and sour me on it permanently before we'd really even tried it, and that is exactly the way it's proved - for all the lovely scenery and lovely people, this has been outweighed by cold, toilet facilities, worry about gas bottles, water in the bilge, spiders, broken diesel heater, exploding batteries, cricked back, constantly cracking my head etc. 

 

I think if you have lots of time, a reasonable amount of money and an outgoing nature, it's probably a very pleasant experience. But me, I'm really struggling just to keep my head above water at the moment (perhaps literally before I'm off this boat). 

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18 minutes ago, noether said:

 

This was my concern before we moved on the boat, I said to my wife that my worry was that there would be an agglomeration of irritations that would make it a miserable experience and sour me on it permanently before we'd really even tried it, and that is exactly the way it's proved - for all the lovely scenery and lovely people, this has been outweighed by cold, toilet facilities, worry about gas bottles, water in the bilge, spiders, broken diesel heater, exploding batteries, cricked back, constantly cracking my head etc. 

 

I think if you have lots of time, a reasonable amount of money and an outgoing nature, it's probably a very pleasant experience. But me, I'm really struggling just to keep my head above water at the moment (perhaps literally before I'm off this boat). 

 

I fully understand how you feel. Once its no longer being enjoyable it's time to sell up and move on. We did six years ago now.

 

I was actually glad to wave our boat off from our mooring is it was being moved to the brokers. Even gladder when it sold.

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5 minutes ago, BEngo said:

Paul Allen of Microsoft : "The happiest day in your life is when you buy your boat.  The next is when you sell it."

 

Reminds me of the quote by victorian Prime Minister Lord Salisbury, "There are only 2 happy occasions for a prime minister during his tenure: his first day in office, and his last."

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2 hours ago, noether said:

 

This was my concern before we moved on the boat, I said to my wife that my worry was that there would be an agglomeration of irritations that would make it a miserable experience and sour me on it permanently before we'd really even tried it, and that is exactly the way it's proved - for all the lovely scenery and lovely people, this has been outweighed by cold, toilet facilities, worry about gas bottles, water in the bilge, spiders, broken diesel heater, exploding batteries, cricked back, constantly cracking my head etc. 

 

I think if you have lots of time, a reasonable amount of money and an outgoing nature, it's probably a very pleasant experience. But me, I'm really struggling just to keep my head above water at the moment (perhaps literally before I'm off this boat). 


Very honest of you. 

 

How long have you been living on the boat?

Have you travelled much?
For me, the option and ability to travel and get to lots of places out weighs any discomforts. It’s really a ridiculous space to be living in, a 7’ wide boat with cabins where I bump me head and trip up over everything. But I somehow love it. My space. 

 

Think of the positives; winter’s  coming and you won’t need your fridge. 


Have you done a winter?

 

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10 minutes ago, Goliath said:


Very honest of you. 

 

How long have you been living on the boat?

Have you travelled much?
For me, the option and ability to travel and get to lots of places out weighs any discomforts. It’s really a ridiculous space to be living in, a 7’ wide boat with cabins where I bump me head and trip up over everything. But I somehow love it. My space. 

 

Think of the positives; winter’s  coming and you won’t need your fridge. 


Have you done a winter?

 

 

Moved on to the boat in April, I've been on my own since July.

 

Haven't travelled at all, and like I say, I'm afraid that I'm permanently soured now, even thinking about trying to take the boat out makes me feel ill, you know like when you're a kid and you get really really drunk on a certain type of drink, and you can't then even countenance the idea of drinking that drink again? I feel like that about it.  

 

I'm also extremely busy with work at the moment, I work every day (including weekends), and as another moorer put it to me when I talked to him about it, "Lots of people think they'll live on a boat and work a fulltime job, but most soon give up one or the other." Even with the boat moored at the marina, plugged in to the mains, with a shower block nearby, it still takes all my energy just to get through the day. I can't begin to imagine what it'd be like trying to take the boat out. 

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8 minutes ago, noether said:

 

Moved on to the boat in April, I've been on my own since July.

 

Haven't travelled at all, and like I say, I'm afraid that I'm permanently soured now, even thinking about trying to take the boat out makes me feel ill, you know like when you're a kid and you get really really drunk on a certain type of drink, and you can't then even countenance the idea of drinking that drink again? I feel like that about it.  

 

I'm also extremely busy with work at the moment, I work every day (including weekends), and as another moorer put it to me when I talked to him about it, "Lots of people think they'll live on a boat and work a fulltime job, but most soon give up one or the other." Even with the boat moored at the marina, plugged in to the mains, with a shower block nearby, it still takes all my energy just to get through the day. I can't begin to imagine what it'd be like trying to take the boat out. 

 

This is deeply sad. Whose idea was it to move onto a boat? Living on a boat and holding down a full time job is fine IME, but you're not doing a full time job, you're doing more than a full time job. 9 to 5, five days a week is perfectly compatible with boat living. 9 to 5 seven days a week certainly isn't.

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