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Curious to best practice in regards to Bilge pumps, will have mine accessible via a hatch under the cabin stairs as no run holes through bulk head. Could this bilge's pump out go through the bulk head into the engine bay then out via the engine bilge pump? OR Would a decent cabin bilge be able to pump water upwards and out via side hole in hull above water line? 

Any advice would be appreciated. Cheers. 

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Any bilge pump should be able to pump a couple of metres (head) above the water line.

 

Ideally any Hull fittings/openings (exhaust, drains, bilge pump, etc) should be a minimum of 10" above the waterline. This is to avoid any water getting syphoned back into the boat.

 

 

From the BSS (Boat Safety Scheme guidance)

 

To reduce the risk of your boat sinking if it keels over or is excessively weighed down, it's a good idea for privately owned boats to only have openings which are at a height of at least 250mm (10ins) above the waterline. Where openings are necessary below this level this risk can be reduced by ensuring that these openings are permanently and securely connected to ducts or pipes, which are watertight up to that level.

Self-draining cockpits may not be able to meet the 250mm (10ins) recommendation but, for privately owned boats, it's a good idea to stop water getting into other parts of the hull by incorporating non-return valves in the drains and/or having bulkheads or cills up to a height of 150mm (6ins).

A weed hatch, if not properly secured, can allow water into the bilges of a boat, which could ultimately cause it to sink. It's advisable for privately owned boats to have a secure and watertight weed hatch which reaches to at least 150mm (6ins) above the waterline, when the boat is loaded up as normal. [10.3]

 

Edited by Alan de Enfield
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You can have an access hole under the rear steps.  Then have a bilge pump for on the end of a piece of wood which you can drop into the hole.  A long enough length of hose to pump out through the rear doors, either over the side or into the engine ‘ole bilge.  Long enough cable with crock clips to reach a battery.

 

it does not need to be permanently installed with float switch.

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This is what i was thinking, I'm a continuous cruiser so will never be away from the boat for long periods of time, and like all mechanical things clean, so will always be having my head in the engine bay. That and the hatch under the stairs i think i could manage, with one manual pump and then one electrical one i can like you said throw onto the battery direct and use it when needed, plus got a decent sponge and bucket!!!! ha!

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A wet and dry vac is handy for unwanted bilge water.  Gets it drier than any pump and you can do other things with it.  Only any use if you have enough inverter capacity though.

 

N

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A bilge pump needs a minimum amount of water before it can pick up anyway. If there is that much water sitting in the cabin bilge it is not a good thing. A cabin bilge in a modern design and newish boat shouldn't be getting wet anyway. An inspection hole and some sort of pump for emergencies is all that's needed. The only time I've had need of it was when a water pump started leaking, but wasn't noticed for several days as it wasn't triggering the pump to run. Ended up having to pump a couple of inches out from the inspection hole and had a portable pump that could be connected to the batteries to throw it overboard.

Jen

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On 25/01/2021 at 10:17, BEngo said:

A wet and dry vac is handy for unwanted bilge water.  Gets it drier than any pump and you can do other things with it.  Only any use if you have enough inverter capacity though.

 

N

 

I agree, bilge pumps always leave a few mm of water behind.

 

I use one of these in the lowest point of the cabin bilge and by the hot and cold water pumps, then use a wet vac to remove any water if they sound.

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Basement-Overflow-Battery-powered-Detector-Security/dp/B075D77FYD/ref=asc_df_B075D77FYD/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=218062062196&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=17879000640032921732&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=t&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1007147&hvtargid=pla-613456477112&psc=1

 

 

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