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Stourport to Bristol is it possible?


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7 minutes ago, Victor Vectis said:

Thanks for posting that Simon.

It's a tad scary!

Narrowboats aren't designed for that sort of thing but, to quote Marriot Edgar, it would appear that 'There were no wrecks and no one was drownded'.

 

We went across the Wash, Boston to Wisbech, a few days before you in 2019. Four boats, one pilot and one apprentice pilot. The most difficult part being the 180° turn to face the incoming tide prior to mooring at Wisbech. I never feel comfortable when the boat is going sideways! I know the boat will come round but I feel it won't. Things weren't helped by one of our convoy getting in the way. He didn't heed the pilot's instructions to hang back and give me space to turn.

 

We had planned to make a piloted crossing from Eastham Locks to Liverpool this summer but like everything else that got knocked into touch by the wretched virus.

 

Can I ask those who have undertaken the Sharpness - Bristol passage or the Mersey crossing how they compare with the jaunt across the Wash, the tidal Thames out of Limehouse or the Trent from Keadby (Turn right on leaving the lock NOT left)

I have not crossed the Wash or been on the Trent or Mersey but in terms of sheer naked fear the Sharpness - Bristol passage is probably up at the top but on a calm day with someone who knows his stuff it is really no big deal, its just the fear of actually doing it and the worry, most of us float around it ditches where we can pole the thing to the bank but you'd need a very long pole on the Severn. The tidal Thames through London is only a worry because it  has a real tidal current and also it gets as rough as pretty much anywhere we have ever been with waves coming at you from every direction from other boats and that blasted trip boat inflatable that tears around at high speed below (?) Limehouse but if you can survive that then Sharpness is quite safe.

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1 hour ago, Bee said:

I have not crossed the Wash or been on the Trent or Mersey but in terms of sheer naked fear the Sharpness - Bristol passage is probably up at the top but on a calm day with someone who knows his stuff it is really no big deal, its just the fear of actually doing it and the worry, most of us float around it ditches where we can pole the thing to the bank but you'd need a very long pole on the Severn. The tidal Thames through London is only a worry because it  has a real tidal current and also it gets as rough as pretty much anywhere we have ever been with waves coming at you from every direction from other boats and that blasted trip boat inflatable that tears around at high speed below (?) Limehouse but if you can survive that then Sharpness is quite safe.

I find the main challenge on the tidal Thames - and I am now pretty experienced - is the huge variety of boats that you will encounter, some much bigger than you, some much smaller, and working out the safest way to avoid collisions! 

As well as the trip boats, the Met Police can generate a bit of wash ...

dsc_9336.jpg

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How about "Wash and Go" with Chris Coburn  

 

22 hours ago, Victor Vectis said:

And even longer ago 'NB Holderness' wrote a blog about going out of Keadby to Hull. He quoted the lockie as saying "He'd never known a narrowboat turn left out of the lock before" But I think the writer (Tony?) used to work as a Humber pilot.

He goes lots of places others wouldn't

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2 hours ago, Victor Vectis said:

Thanks for posting that Simon.

It's a tad scary!

Narrowboats aren't designed for that sort of thing but, to quote Marriot Edgar, it would appear that 'There were no wrecks and no one was drownded'.

 

We went across the Wash, Boston to Wisbech, a few days before you in 2019. Four boats, one pilot and one apprentice pilot. The most difficult part being the 180° turn to face the incoming tide prior to mooring at Wisbech. I never feel comfortable when the boat is going sideways! I know the boat will come round but I feel it won't. Things weren't helped by one of our convoy getting in the way. He didn't heed the pilot's instructions to hang back and give me space to turn.

 

We had planned to make a piloted crossing from Eastham Locks to Liverpool this summer but like everything else that got knocked into touch by the wretched virus.

 

Can I ask those who have undertaken the Sharpness - Bristol passage or the Mersey crossing how they compare with the jaunt across the Wash, the tidal Thames out of Limehouse or the Trent from Keadby (Turn right on leaving the lock NOT left)

This is a time laps video crossing the Wash, I don't know if there is a commentary as this machine doesnt do sound 

 

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A great big thank you to all those good folk who have taken the time to share their experiences and advice. We we will use this time in lockdown to digest everything and come to a decision. 

We will share with you that decision and any consequences from the potential adventure.

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On 14/01/2021 at 09:19, Victor Vectis said:

Can I ask those who have undertaken the Sharpness - Bristol passage or the Mersey crossing how they compare with the jaunt across the Wash, the tidal Thames out of Limehouse or the Trent from Keadby (Turn right on leaving the lock NOT left)

We've done all of those - albeit on a barge not a narrow boat.

 

All short sea passages are very weather dependent. We've crossed The Wash when it's been so calm we might have been on a canal, and other times when we've been holding on for dear life! My advice would be to look at least 3 x different weather prediction services - preferably with some sort of wave height prediction (0.3 m is plenty for a narrow boat) - and if all of them agree that it's OK to go, then it probably is. You, as skipper, are responsible for your crafts safety, so it's your call. You can take advice from the pilot, which will most likely be sensible, but it's ultimately your decision. Some friends of ours got caught in 1m swell last summer with a pilot on board - not much fun, and not much left standing inside.

 

Of those 5 passages I would say that, all given good weather, the most challenging is the Severn. There's one section where you need to head across from one side of the estuary to the other with a huge tide taking you sideways. The pilots know where to go, and if you have a good recent chart (you'd better have) and GPS tracking it's fairly straightforward, you'll still post some impressive speeds though. Not for the novice without a pilot.

 

Next comes The Wash - there are more than a few things that can go wrong there - again a good chart, up to date buoyage info from the ports you are using, and good GPS tracking are the very minimum you'll need. If going up the Great Ouse I'd suggest stopping on the pontoons at Kings Lynn - hang the expense. It's an interesting town, and you get to go under the low bridges at a time you choose, rather than near the top of the tide. Once in the other rivers it's reasonably easy going.

 

The Thames in London is a pain because of the number of high speed craft making huge washes. We've been along the Maas in Rotterdam and the Thames is worse for wash. The banks are all solid so it all just reflects back into the river making for very confused water. Best plan is to try and find an early tide on a Sunday and book Limehouse out of hours so you can catch it. Once upstream of Chelsea it's not such a problem, and makes for a nice trip.

 

The Trent upstream of Keadby requires good chart reading skills - but is probably the easiest passage of those listed. Spring tides can run fairly fast, but the smallest neaps are barely noticeable. There are a couple of places you need to be careful - but these are clearly marked on the chart. Don't miss the pies in the pub at Torksey.

 

All of the above is my personal opinion, others will probably have had different experiences.

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On 14/01/2021 at 09:19, Victor Vectis said:

 

Can I ask those who have undertaken the Sharpness - Bristol passage or the Mersey crossing how they compare with the jaunt across the Wash, the tidal Thames out of Limehouse or the Trent from Keadby (Turn right on leaving the lock NOT left)

 

It's very difficult to compare unless you do these tidal journeys regularly. It really depends on the day. I used to go up and down the Thames to and from Limehouse when I was moored at Brentford and once it wasn't dissimilar to the video posted by Schlolar Gypsy. On the other hand I've taken my boat from Bristol to Sharpness and it was flat calm until the approach to Sharpness.

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I'm from Norfolk so the Wash appeals to me the most. The shortest journey I can see on the map is to go from Boston to go up the River Welland.

 

It looks like a short enough trip to be pretty confident that there won't be a change in weather. How much of an adventure would this be for a first-timer?

 

Would I need a pilot for this? VHF radio? Navigation charts? Do I have to pay for locks or access (other than the gold license for the river)?

 

Anybody done this?

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7 minutes ago, jetzi said:

Would I need a pilot for this? VHF radio? Navigation charts?

I think if you need to ask these questions then it would not be a good idea for you to try to make the trip without help.

 

Remember - King John lost his Crown Jewels in the Wash because he refused to take the advice of a local guide.

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4 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

I think if you need to ask these questions then it would not be a good idea for you to try to make the trip without help.

Such a strange attitude, everyone is a first timer once and the way they prepare is to find out from people who know more than they do.

 

Don't worry, I'm not planning on doing it, at least not any time soon and definitely not without a lot of research. I'm not going make a comment on an internet forum, buy a radio and sail out to sea!

 

This thread is all about what's involved with taking canal boats into estuaries and I've found it really interesting. I'm mostly curious what would be the safest sea/estuary passage for a beginner as a starting point, that's why I ask. To be honest I doubt I'll ever actually do anything like it.

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24 minutes ago, jetzi said:

I'm from Norfolk so the Wash appeals to me the most. The shortest journey I can see on the map is to go from Boston to go up the River Welland.

 

It looks like a short enough trip to be pretty confident that there won't be a change in weather. How much of an adventure would this be for a first-timer?

 

Would I need a pilot for this? VHF radio? Navigation charts? Do I have to pay for locks or access (other than the gold license for the river)?

 

Anybody done this?

Not me but 

 

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21 minutes ago, jetzi said:

I'm from Norfolk so the Wash appeals to me the most. The shortest journey I can see on the map is to go from Boston to go up the River Welland.

 

It looks like a short enough trip to be pretty confident that there won't be a change in weather. How much of an adventure would this be for a first-timer?

 

Would I need a pilot for this? VHF radio? Navigation charts? Do I have to pay for locks or access (other than the gold license for the river)?

 

Anybody done this?

This is the only blog I am aware of, by VERY experienced boaters. IWA Lincoln branch have organised trips I think.  A non-trivial trip, for the reasons explained in the blog, and you are out in open water for quite a long time, pretty similar to the other Wash crossings. The Welland (Fulney lock) and the Glen are not well used.   So I would agree with @Alan de Enfield comment!

http://www.tuesdaynightclub.co.uk/Tour_01/fen8.html

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9 minutes ago, jetzi said:

Such a strange attitude, everyone is a first timer once and the way they prepare is to find out from people who know more than they do.

 

Don't worry, I'm not planning on doing it, at least not any time soon and definitely not without a lot of research. I'm not going make a comment on an internet forum, buy a radio and sail out to sea!

 

This thread is all about what's involved with taking canal boats into estuaries and I've found it really interesting. I'm mostly curious what would be the safest sea/estuary passage for a beginner as a starting point, that's why I ask. To be honest I doubt I'll ever actually do anything like it.

Inshore tidal boating around the shallows and banks such as the Wash are much more dangerous than being "out at sea".

We brought a boat back from Croatia to Hull (3050 miles in 28 days) and the most worrying area was coming up the East Coast of Lincolnshire, even 'miles' out to sea there are banks and shoals just a couple of feet below the surface - some even dry out at Low Water and people go out and play cricket on them at big spring tides.

 

Coastal cruising is not something you can learn from other people on the internet, you have to experience yourself by doing it as crew on another boat, or having someone experienced on your boat.

If you are planning to do a bit of coastal cruising then it would pay to do the RYA Day-Skippers course. If it going to be a 'one-off' then get a pilot to do it with you.

 

Yes you need VHF radio and have a licence to use it, and have a licence for the boat to have a VHF fitted.

Yes you need charts, but as the fairways (channels) can move on an almost daily basis you need to have the lasted 'Notice to Mariners' recording the movement of the marker buoys (I probably get two notices per week about channel movements in my cruising area).

Ideally you also need a depthfinder and a GPS navigation system.

You also need an anchor that is of suitable size and design for your boat.

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13 hours ago, jetzi said:

Such a strange attitude, everyone is a first timer once and the way they prepare is to find out from people who know more than they do.

 

Don't worry, I'm not planning on doing it, at least not any time soon and definitely not without a lot of research. I'm not going make a comment on an internet forum, buy a radio and sail out to sea!

 

This thread is all about what's involved with taking canal boats into estuaries and I've found it really interesting. I'm mostly curious what would be the safest sea/estuary passage for a beginner as a starting point, that's why I ask. To be honest I doubt I'll ever actually do anything like it.

That's a bit unfair on Alan for his comment. After all, he is a lumpy water enthusiast. What he was saying, I guess, is that pre-trip research is a necessity but is not sufficient and on the spot advice as you make the trip is very different, not least on a passage that is noted for the speed at which things change.

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1 hour ago, Mike Todd said:

That's a bit unfair on Alan for his comment. After all, he is a lumpy water enthusiast. What he was saying, I guess, is that pre-trip research is a necessity but is not sufficient and on the spot advice as you make the trip is very different, not least on a passage that is noted for the speed at which things change.

I'm sorry, you are right and I apologise Alan. I realise that giving out advice here might make it sound like you're endorsing the idea that novices go out into dangerous boating situations with little training, and that could be potentially deadly.

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On 17/01/2021 at 21:25, Alan de Enfield said:

Coastal cruising is not something you can learn from other people on the internet, you have to experience yourself by doing it as crew on another boat, or having someone experienced on your boat.

As a fellow experienced lumpy water person, I would say that Alan's advise, particular the bit I have quoted, is very relevant.     I love messing around on the water in all types of boat, always important that you use the right boat for the right type of water that you wish to explore. 

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On 17/01/2021 at 21:28, jetzi said:

Thanks Alan. I think the RYA day-skippers sounds like a great idea to learn about what coastal cruising is really like and whether or not it's for me. I will look into it.

 Before taking  an RYA Day Skippers course of training, which for a novice requires a certain degree of commitment, both theory and practical, and may take a fair amount of time, may I suggest that you do an RYA Competent Crew first which would give you a flavour of exactly what coastal cruising is all about? If you are still keen then Day Skippers is the logical next step.

 

Good luck and enjoy, whatever you decide.

 

Howard

 

 

 

 

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7 minutes ago, howardang said:

 Before taking  an RYA Day Skippers course of training, which for a novice requires a certain degree of commitment, both theory and practical, and may take a fair amount of time, may I suggest that you do an RYA Competent Crew first which would give you a flavour of exactly what coastal cruising is all about? If you are still keen then Day Skippers is the logical next step.

 

Good luck and enjoy, whatever you decide.

 

Howard

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completely agree that the Day Skipper is quite an investent in time (both theory and practical) but for a 'skipper' I consider the syllabus to be very lacking.

 

A skipper needs to know navigation (paper and electronic), route planning and 'safe- havens', tides and effect on the boat, buoyage and channels markings, how to anchor etc etc..

 

The syllabus for 'crew' doesn't cover any of these, if the intention is to move on to the 'Day-Skipper' after the competent crew then fine, but I think that you will learn everything on the 'Crew' syllabus + the stuff needed for a skipper om the Day Skipper course.

 

The Training courses are available for 'Power' or 'Sail' but do cover the basocs of both.

 

Competent Crew Syllabus

The Competent Crew course introduces the complete beginner to cruising and teaches personal safety, seamanship and helmsmanship to the level required to be a useful member of crew of a cruising yacht.

1. Knowledge of sea terms and parts of a boat, her rigging and sails 

  • Sufficient knowledge to understand orders given concerning the sailing and day to day running of the boat. 

2. Sail Handling 

  • Bending on, setting, reefing and handling of sails 
  • Use of sheets and halyards and their associated winches 

3. Ropework 

  • Handling ropes, including coiling, stowing, securing to cleats and single and double bollards 
  • Handling warps 
  • Ability to tie the following knots and to know their correct use: figure-of-eight, clove hitch, rolling hitch, bowline, round turn and two half hitches, single and double sheet bend, reef knot 

4. Fire precautions and fighting 

Awareness of the hazards of fire and the precautions necessary to prevent fireb. Knowledge of the action to be taken in the event of fire 

5. Personal safety equipment 

  • Understands and complies with rules for the wearing of safety harnesses, lifejackets and personal buoyancy aids 

6. Man overboard 

  • Understands the action to be taken to recover a man overboard 

7. Emergency equipment 

  • Can operate distress flares and knows when they should be used 
  • Understands how to launch and board a liferaft 

8. Manners and customs 

  • Understands accepted practice with regard to: use of burgees and ensigns, prevention of unnecessary noise or disturbance in harbour including courtesies to other craft berthed 
  • Aware of the responsibility of yacht skippers to protect the environment 

9. Rules of the road 

  • Is able to keep and efficient lookout at sea 

10. Dinghies 

  • Understands and complies with the loading rulesb. 
  • Is able to handle a dinghy under oars 

11. Meteorology 

  • Awareness of forecasting services and knowledge of the Beaufort scale 

12. Seasickness 

  • Working efficiency is unaffected/partially affected/severely affected by seasickness 

13. Helmsmanship and sailing 

  • Understands the basic principles of sailing and can steer and trim sails on all points of sailing 
  • Can steer a compass course, under sail and power 

14. General duties 

  • Has carried out general duties satisfactorily on deck and below decks in connection with the daily routine of the vessel

 

The Day Skipper has a requirement to have both Practical and Theoretical training

Day Skipper Practical Syllabus

The Day Skipper course teaches pilotage, navigation, seamanship and boat handling up to the required standard to skipper a small cruising yacht safely by day in tidal waters with which the student is familiar. 

1. Preparation for sea 

  • Is able to prepare a yacht for sea, including engine checks, selection of sails, securing and stowage of all gear on deck and below 

2. Deck Work 

  • Can reef, shake out reefs and change sails to suit prevailing conditions 
  • Can prepare an anchor, mooring warps and take charge on deck when mooring alongside, coming to a buoy, anchoring, weighing anchor and slipping from a buoy or alongside berth 

3. Navigation 

  • Is proficient in chartwork and routine navigational duties on passage including: Taking and plotting visual fixes Use of electronic navigation equipment for position fixing 
  • Use of waypoints 
  • Working up to DR and EP 
  • Estimating tidal heights and tidal streams 
  • Working out course to steer to allow for tidal stream, leeway and drift 
  • Knowledge of IALA buoyage 
  • Maintenance of navigational records 
  • Use of echo sounder and lead line 

4. Pilotage 

  • Can prepare and execute a pilotage plan for entry into, or departure from, harbour 
  • Understands the use of leading and clearing lines 
  • Use of transits and surroundings as aids to pilotage 

5. Meteorology 

  • Knows sources of forecast information 
  • Can interpret shipping forecasts and use a barometer as a forecasting aid 

6. Rule of the road 

  • Has a working knowledge of the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea 

7. Maintenance and repair work 

  • Understands and is able to carry out maintenance tasks 
  • Knows the properties and uses of common synthetic fibre ropes 

8. Engines 

  • Knows how to change fuel and water filters, pump impeller and to bleed the fuel system 

9. Victualling 

  • Understands how to victual a yacht 

10. Emergency situations 

  • Is able to take correct action as skipper for recovery of man overboard 
  • Understands distress flares and how to use a liferaft 
  • Can operate a radiotelephone in an emergency and send a distress message 
  • Understands how to secure a tow 
  • Understands rescue procedures including helicopter rescue 

11. Yacht handling under power 

  • Can bring a boat safely to and from an alongside berth, mooring buoy and anchor under various conditions of wind and tide 
  • Can steer and trim sails effectively on all points of sailing 

12. Passage making 

  • Can plan and make a coastal passage, taking account of relevant navigational hazards and limitations imposed by the type of boat and the strength of the crew 

13. Night cruising 

  • Has experienced sail cruising at night, including leaving and entering harbour. 
  • Understands the special consideration for pilotage plans, keeping a lookout and identifying marks by night. 

14. Seasickness 

  • Working efficiency is unaffected/partially affected/severely affected by seasickness 

15. Helmsmanship and sailing 

  • Understands the basic principles of sailing and can steer and trim sails on all points of sailing 
  • Can steer a compass course, under sail and power 

16. General duties 

  • Has carried out general duties satisfactorily on deck and below decks in connection with the daily routine of the vessel

Day Skipper Theory Syllabus

A comprehensive introduction to chart work, navigation, meteorology and the basics of seamanship for Competent Crew. You will find this course invaluable if you want to learn to start making decisions onboard. 

1. Nautical terms 

  • Parts of a boat and hull 
  • General nautical terminology 

2. Ropework 

  • Knowledge of the properties of synthetic ropes in common use 

3. Anchorwork 

  • Characteristics of different types of anchor 
  • Considerations to be taken into account when anchoring 

4. Safety 

  • Knowledge of the safety equipment to be carried, its stowage and use (see RYA Boat Safety Handbook, C8) 
  • Fire precautions and fire fighting 
  • Use of personal safety equipment, harnesses and lifejacketsd. 
  • Ability to send a distress signal by VHF radiotelephonee. 
  • Basic knowledge of rescue procedures including helicopter rescue 

5. International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea 

  • Steering and sailing rules (5,7,8,9,10 and 12-19) 
  • General rules (all other rules) 

6. Definition of position, course and speed 

  • Latitude and longitude 
  • Knowledge of standard navigational terms 
  • True bearings and courses 
  • The knot 

7. Navigational charts and publications 

  • Information shown on charts, chart symbols and representation of direction and distance 
  • Navigational publications in common use 
  • Chart correction 

8. Navigational drawing instruments 

  • Use of parallel rulers, dividers and proprietary plotting instruments 

9. Compass 

  • Application of variation 
  • Awareness of deviation and its causes 
  • Use of hand-bearing compass 

10. Chartwork 

  • Dead reckoning and estimated position including an awareness of leeway 
  • Techniques of visual fixing 
  • Satellite-derived positions 
  • Use of waypoints to fix position 
  • Course to steer 

11. Tides and tidal streams 

  • Tidal definitions, levels and datum 
  • Tide tables 
  • Use of Admiralty method of determining tidal height at standard port and awareness of corrections for secondary ports 
  • Use of tidal diamonds and tidal stream atlases for chartwork 

12. Visual aids to navigation 

  • Lighthouses and beacons, light characteristics 

13. Meteorology 

  • Sources of broadcast meteorological information 
  • Knowledge of terms used in shipping forecasts, including the Beaufort scale, and their significance to small craft 
  • Basic knowledge of highs, lows and fronts 

14. Passage planning 

  • Preparation of navigational plan for short coastal passagesb. Meteorological considerations in planning short coastal passages 
  • Use of waypoints on passaged. Importance of confirmation of position by an independent source 
  • Keeping a navigational 

15. Navigation in restricted visibility 

  • Precautions to be taken in, and limitations imposed by fog 

16. Pilotage 

  • Use of transits, leading lines and clearing lines 
  • IALA system of buoyage for Region A 
  • Use of sailing directions 
  • Pilotage plans and harbour entry 

17. Marine environment 

  • Responsibility for avoiding pollution and protecting the marine environment
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15 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

 

Completely agree that the Day Skipper is quite an investent in time (both theory and practical) but for a 'skipper' I consider the syllabus to be very lacking.

 

A skipper needs to know navigation (paper and electronic), route planning and 'safe- havens', tides and effect on the boat, buoyage and channels markings, how to anchor etc etc..

 

The syllabus for 'crew' doesn't cover any of these, if the intention is to move on to the 'Day-Skipper' after the competent crew then fine, but I think that you will learn everything on the 'Crew' syllabus + the stuff needed for a skipper om the Day Skipper course.

 

The Training courses are available for 'Power' or 'Sail' but do cover the basocs of both.

 

Competent Crew Syllabus

The Competent Crew course introduces the complete beginner to cruising and teaches personal safety, seamanship and helmsmanship to the level required to be a useful member of crew of a cruising yacht.

1. Knowledge of sea terms and parts of a boat, her rigging and sails 

  • Sufficient knowledge to understand orders given concerning the sailing and day to day running of the boat. 

2. Sail Handling 

  • Bending on, setting, reefing and handling of sails 
  • Use of sheets and halyards and their associated winches 

3. Ropework 

  • Handling ropes, including coiling, stowing, securing to cleats and single and double bollards 
  • Handling warps 
  • Ability to tie the following knots and to know their correct use: figure-of-eight, clove hitch, rolling hitch, bowline, round turn and two half hitches, single and double sheet bend, reef knot 

4. Fire precautions and fighting 

Awareness of the hazards of fire and the precautions necessary to prevent fireb. Knowledge of the action to be taken in the event of fire 

5. Personal safety equipment 

  • Understands and complies with rules for the wearing of safety harnesses, lifejackets and personal buoyancy aids 

6. Man overboard 

  • Understands the action to be taken to recover a man overboard 

7. Emergency equipment 

  • Can operate distress flares and knows when they should be used 
  • Understands how to launch and board a liferaft 

8. Manners and customs 

  • Understands accepted practice with regard to: use of burgees and ensigns, prevention of unnecessary noise or disturbance in harbour including courtesies to other craft berthed 
  • Aware of the responsibility of yacht skippers to protect the environment 

9. Rules of the road 

  • Is able to keep and efficient lookout at sea 

10. Dinghies 

  • Understands and complies with the loading rulesb. 
  • Is able to handle a dinghy under oars 

11. Meteorology 

  • Awareness of forecasting services and knowledge of the Beaufort scale 

12. Seasickness 

  • Working efficiency is unaffected/partially affected/severely affected by seasickness 

13. Helmsmanship and sailing 

  • Understands the basic principles of sailing and can steer and trim sails on all points of sailing 
  • Can steer a compass course, under sail and power 

14. General duties 

  • Has carried out general duties satisfactorily on deck and below decks in connection with the daily routine of the vessel

 

The Day Skipper has a requirement to have both Practical and Theoretical training

Day Skipper Practical Syllabus

The Day Skipper course teaches pilotage, navigation, seamanship and boat handling up to the required standard to skipper a small cruising yacht safely by day in tidal waters with which the student is familiar. 

1. Preparation for sea 

  • Is able to prepare a yacht for sea, including engine checks, selection of sails, securing and stowage of all gear on deck and below 

2. Deck Work 

  • Can reef, shake out reefs and change sails to suit prevailing conditions 
  • Can prepare an anchor, mooring warps and take charge on deck when mooring alongside, coming to a buoy, anchoring, weighing anchor and slipping from a buoy or alongside berth 

3. Navigation 

  • Is proficient in chartwork and routine navigational duties on passage including: Taking and plotting visual fixes Use of electronic navigation equipment for position fixing 
  • Use of waypoints 
  • Working up to DR and EP 
  • Estimating tidal heights and tidal streams 
  • Working out course to steer to allow for tidal stream, leeway and drift 
  • Knowledge of IALA buoyage 
  • Maintenance of navigational records 
  • Use of echo sounder and lead line 

4. Pilotage 

  • Can prepare and execute a pilotage plan for entry into, or departure from, harbour 
  • Understands the use of leading and clearing lines 
  • Use of transits and surroundings as aids to pilotage 

5. Meteorology 

  • Knows sources of forecast information 
  • Can interpret shipping forecasts and use a barometer as a forecasting aid 

6. Rule of the road 

  • Has a working knowledge of the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea 

7. Maintenance and repair work 

  • Understands and is able to carry out maintenance tasks 
  • Knows the properties and uses of common synthetic fibre ropes 

8. Engines 

  • Knows how to change fuel and water filters, pump impeller and to bleed the fuel system 

9. Victualling 

  • Understands how to victual a yacht 

10. Emergency situations 

  • Is able to take correct action as skipper for recovery of man overboard 
  • Understands distress flares and how to use a liferaft 
  • Can operate a radiotelephone in an emergency and send a distress message 
  • Understands how to secure a tow 
  • Understands rescue procedures including helicopter rescue 

11. Yacht handling under power 

  • Can bring a boat safely to and from an alongside berth, mooring buoy and anchor under various conditions of wind and tide 
  • Can steer and trim sails effectively on all points of sailing 

12. Passage making 

  • Can plan and make a coastal passage, taking account of relevant navigational hazards and limitations imposed by the type of boat and the strength of the crew 

13. Night cruising 

  • Has experienced sail cruising at night, including leaving and entering harbour. 
  • Understands the special consideration for pilotage plans, keeping a lookout and identifying marks by night. 

14. Seasickness 

  • Working efficiency is unaffected/partially affected/severely affected by seasickness 

15. Helmsmanship and sailing 

  • Understands the basic principles of sailing and can steer and trim sails on all points of sailing 
  • Can steer a compass course, under sail and power 

16. General duties 

  • Has carried out general duties satisfactorily on deck and below decks in connection with the daily routine of the vessel

Day Skipper Theory Syllabus

A comprehensive introduction to chart work, navigation, meteorology and the basics of seamanship for Competent Crew. You will find this course invaluable if you want to learn to start making decisions onboard. 

1. Nautical terms 

  • Parts of a boat and hull 
  • General nautical terminology 

2. Ropework 

  • Knowledge of the properties of synthetic ropes in common use 

3. Anchorwork 

  • Characteristics of different types of anchor 
  • Considerations to be taken into account when anchoring 

4. Safety 

  • Knowledge of the safety equipment to be carried, its stowage and use (see RYA Boat Safety Handbook, C8) 
  • Fire precautions and fire fighting 
  • Use of personal safety equipment, harnesses and lifejacketsd. 
  • Ability to send a distress signal by VHF radiotelephonee. 
  • Basic knowledge of rescue procedures including helicopter rescue 

5. International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea 

  • Steering and sailing rules (5,7,8,9,10 and 12-19) 
  • General rules (all other rules) 

6. Definition of position, course and speed 

  • Latitude and longitude 
  • Knowledge of standard navigational terms 
  • True bearings and courses 
  • The knot 

7. Navigational charts and publications 

  • Information shown on charts, chart symbols and representation of direction and distance 
  • Navigational publications in common use 
  • Chart correction 

8. Navigational drawing instruments 

  • Use of parallel rulers, dividers and proprietary plotting instruments 

9. Compass 

  • Application of variation 
  • Awareness of deviation and its causes 
  • Use of hand-bearing compass 

10. Chartwork 

  • Dead reckoning and estimated position including an awareness of leeway 
  • Techniques of visual fixing 
  • Satellite-derived positions 
  • Use of waypoints to fix position 
  • Course to steer 

11. Tides and tidal streams 

  • Tidal definitions, levels and datum 
  • Tide tables 
  • Use of Admiralty method of determining tidal height at standard port and awareness of corrections for secondary ports 
  • Use of tidal diamonds and tidal stream atlases for chartwork 

12. Visual aids to navigation 

  • Lighthouses and beacons, light characteristics 

13. Meteorology 

  • Sources of broadcast meteorological information 
  • Knowledge of terms used in shipping forecasts, including the Beaufort scale, and their significance to small craft 
  • Basic knowledge of highs, lows and fronts 

14. Passage planning 

  • Preparation of navigational plan for short coastal passagesb. Meteorological considerations in planning short coastal passages 
  • Use of waypoints on passaged. Importance of confirmation of position by an independent source 
  • Keeping a navigational 

15. Navigation in restricted visibility 

  • Precautions to be taken in, and limitations imposed by fog 

16. Pilotage 

  • Use of transits, leading lines and clearing lines 
  • IALA system of buoyage for Region A 
  • Use of sailing directions 
  • Pilotage plans and harbour entry 

17. Marine environment 

  • Responsibility for avoiding pollution and protecting the marine environment

Alan

 

You have made my point very well. I did say that it might be useful as, if you like, a taster before committing to Day Skipper. I am very aware of the knowledge required in RYA certification including CC and Day Skipper.

 

Howard

 

 

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18 minutes ago, howardang said:

I am very aware of the knowledge required in RYA certification including CC and Day Skipper.

 

 

I know, but I was posting it more for the benefit of the OP.

 

The only 'problem' with doing the CC and then the DS is that you are going to have to 'sit in the DS classroom' going thru all the stuff you went thru with the CC.

 

If you know you are going to have your own boat then I'd always suggest going straight to the DS, even if it is only the theory course.

 

(It's a good job we are not all the same)

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I would agree with Howard, that better to go for the Competent Crew (which is only a practical if I remember) which would give the OP a good taster to see if they enjoy it before moving on the more in depth DS theory and Practical.      UNLESS ( always an exception to the rule!) the OP already has some boating experience and can look at the CC syllabus and honestly say that they understand and have experience of it.   

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The RYA site says the prerequisites for the Day Skippers is "5 days, 100 miles, 4 night hours on board a sailing yacht"

 

I've been out on a sailboat before for 2-3 hours, but just did as I was told and I didn't really know anything or learn anything. So I think you need to have some kind of background in order to take the course.

 

And sailing is quite another thing to motorboating, isn't it? Learning how to sail seems quite a lot more than just learning to handle a motorboat in open water?

 

 

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