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Geoff_777

Double Glazing

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Personally I would avoid double glazed sealed units for a good few years yet. I feel they still have to prove themselves as to how the seal copes with vibrations and the occasional hull impact.

 

If I were to want to live aboard during the winter I would go for secondary double glazing in a timber frame that can be removed for the summer and also to remove condensation. Probably perspex "glass".

 

A number of people have good results with temporary "heat shrink" films on magnetic or adhesive mounts.

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30 minutes ago, Tony Brooks said:

Personally I would avoid double glazed sealed units for a good few years yet. I feel they still have to prove themselves as to how the seal copes with vibrations and the occasional hull impact.

 

If I were to want to live aboard during the winter I would go for secondary double glazing in a timber frame that can be removed for the summer and also to remove condensation. Probably perspex "glass".

 

A number of people have good results with temporary "heat shrink" films on magnetic or adhesive mounts.

Mine is 10 years old and still in perfik condition Tony, it works well and I would never ever take a backward step of going single glazing

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1 minute ago, peterboat said:

Mine is 10 years old and still in perfik condition Tony, it works well and I would never ever take a backward step of going single glazing

My expensive double glazed units are still faultless glass wise at eleven years old. I get zero condensation on the glass but shed loads on the frames 😑

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2 minutes ago, mrsmelly said:

My expensive double glazed units are still faultless glass wise at eleven years old. I get zero condensation on the glass but shed loads on the frames 😑

I get some condensation on the frames but a quick wipe sorts it better than the old boat, windows used to run with the stuff before I replaced them

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Double glazing has been used on coaches for about 25 years, they get plenty of vibration and seem to survive quite a while.

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1 minute ago, peterboat said:

I get some condensation on the frames but a quick wipe sorts it better than the old boat, windows used to run with the stuff before I replaced them

I agree they do stop wet glass. They are also good for cutting noise down in some areas. They are lots of money for a pauper like what I am.

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11 minutes ago, mrsmelly said:

My expensive double glazed units are still faultless glass wise at eleven years old. I get zero condensation on the glass but shed loads on the frames 😑

Exactly what my neighbour says about his.

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For several years now I've used the "cling film" type successfully. Adhesive tape is placed around the wooden frames and the film is positioned then shrunk with a hairdryer. It's a fiddly job but once you get the hang of it you can make it crease free. The cost of the pack is around £15.

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Thing is, whilst it's nice to have the clear view, it's not the condensation on the glass that causes issues because normally it drains to the outside.  The condensation on the frames has nowhere to go but the surrounding woodwork. Thermal break window frames are what we really need - double glazing would be the icing on that cake.

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2 hours ago, Sea Dog said:

Thing is, whilst it's nice to have the clear view, it's not the condensation on the glass that causes issues because normally it drains to the outside.  The condensation on the frames has nowhere to go but the surrounding woodwork. Thermal break window frames are what we really need - double glazing would be the icing on that cake.

I agree, on my old boat I fitted upvc double glazed caravan units, they were light oak coloured and had no condensation issues at all. The frames were only about 7mm proud of the sides so looked ok, and were leak free

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We went for Wesley windows, double glazed with thermal break. So far they have been excellent, no condensation on either windows or frames

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We have Channelglaze double glazed(tinted glass) windows & are well pleased with them.As others have said,the only slight problem with condensation is a little bit on the frames.

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