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Big John

Burning of candles on boats

Burning candles on boats  

58 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you burn candles on your boat?

  2. 2. How important is this issue to you?

    • It is one of my most important issues
    • It is an important topic but not crucial
    • It is neither important nor unimportant
    • It is not a very important topic for me
    • I place it as one of my least important issues
  3. 3. What is the main reason for your answer on the burning of candles on boats?



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I've got a burning question:

I'd be interested to know how many boaters burn candles on their boats. I have a stock of tea lights, a fragrant candle and a few medium size candles. To light or not to light, that is the question.

If you do burn candles, do you put them on saucers, in jars, in purpose built holders or what?

Please respond to the poll questions, so I can get a feel for your views. Thanks.

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Has anyone considered the health aspects?  Particulates etc?  Because the volume is so much less than a house.

Edited by mross

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We don't burn candles on the boat, but we always keep a couple on board in case the electricity fails. This did happen a couple of times on our first boat (which was equipped with only one leisure battery) but hasn't (touch wood) happened since.

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in case of a complete electricity failure I have a wall mounted paraffin lamp, a couple of battery powered camping lanterns and a few torches.  Candles on boats are unnecessarily dangerous in a way which they aren't in a house.  Boats move and candles can tip over.  Boats typically are fitted out with more flammable materials than houses.  Just not worth the risk IMO.

I wouldn't even keep candles on the boat.  

Little electric tea-lights are available.

 

 

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It seems odd to keep candles for a blackout since LED torches can run non-stop for a week.  Candles in time of war, yes, but a power cut lasting a week is very unlikely.  Camping torches are ideal or the little tea lights for romantic evenings.

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Your question is a good one but, rather than ask here, ring your local fire prevention officer. The fire brigade will have a much better handle on the reward versus risk of using candles. 

  • Greenie 2

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14 minutes ago, mross said:

It seems odd to keep candles for a blackout since LED torches can run non-stop for a week.  Candles in time of war, yes, but a power cut lasting a week is very unlikely.  Camping torches are ideal or the little tea lights for romantic evenings.

YesBut If the Boat's Engine is running  the Tea Light will keep bumping into the Spoon

  • Greenie 1

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Staffordshires fire brigade website suggests candles are safe to use as long as ventilation and disposal after use is correct.

 

Ian.

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Just now, ianali said:

Staffordshires fire brigade website suggests candles are safe to use as long as ventilation and disposal after use is correct.Ian.

1

link, please

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http://www.staffordshirefire.gov.uk/1960.asp does not say they are safe.  950 house fires were caused by candles in 2013/2014.

The risk is low, but easy to eliminate.  I think they are more likely to get knocked over and more likely to set fire to curtains, books, chairs etc than in a house due to the narrow walkways.

Edited by mross

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http://www.staffordshirefire.gov.uk/2579.asp

  • "Ensuring candles and smoking materials are used in well-ventilated areas - and are disposed of safely."

Personally I find this surprising since the main risk with candles is surely them tipping over and setting fire to things.  Boats tend to be well ventilated anyway.  This reads like something copied and pasted from general householder guidance with no particular regard given to the additional risks on boats.

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2 minutes ago, Dave_P said:

This reads like something copied and pasted from general householder guidance with no particular regard given to the additional risks on boats.

 

Correct.  It is.

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We use candles all the time, big fat heavy things that give out a nice light and also just a bit of heat. The worst thing that has ever happened is that the dog singed its tail and it smelt horrid and we had to give it a biscuit. We have never had a candle fall over even when unlit and travelling and bouncing off walls. bridges, trees. other boats and being tossed around by the wash of 1000 ton boats on the Dutch bit of the Rhine. The biggest fire hazard nowadays is owners who have no idea how their boat is put together and lack the confidence and experience to do any work because of the fear of infringing some sort of BSS regulation. Consequently whenever they fiddle with something they are at risk of doing something daft. Hrumph. Sorry, woken up a bit grumpy this morning.

  • Greenie 1

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6 minutes ago, ianali said:

Isn't Davep s link all about boats?

2

why not read it? ;)

Edited by mross

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I really can't imagine how a tea light candle could fall over even if the boat was being steered by Tim & Pru. 

  • Greenie 1

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I think the fires are not caused by candles falling over but by being under or close to combustibles and then being left unattended or the occupant(s) falling asleep.

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9 minutes ago, WotEver said:

I really can't imagine how a tea light candle could fall over even if the boat was being steered by Tim & Pru. 

They could slide and fall off whatever they have been sitting on though.

 

haggis

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Just now, haggis said:

They could slide and fall off whatever they have been sitting on though.

So don't sit them on a shiny surface. Surely common sense has to factor in here somewhere. 

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