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New synthetic fuel from Porsche could lead to I.C.E survival?


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2 minutes ago, alistair1537 said:

As I like to follow new trends, here's something that may give hope to engine lovers...

 

https://jalopnik.com/porsche-claims-its-synthetic-fuel-could-make-combustion-1846319665

 

Over the last few months I have repeatedly posted info on EFuel produced from algae using excess power from windfarms (instead of actually paying them to switch off)

 

 

It has not (shall we say) been well received by the electric-converts on the forum.

 

Example :

 

 

Indeed and following my post #26 it received the typical responses of 'not practical' 'costs twice as much' 'inefficient to produce' etc etc.

 

If the 'user' is prepared to pay 2 or 3x the current cost of diesel to save having to scrap their current engine and replace with a £20k or £30k (or however much it costs) elect system  I'm sure most would take the Efuel.

You can buy a lot of EDiesel at (say) £3 per litre for £30k. I'd suggest that 10,000 hours is as much as many boaters will do in a lifetime, and it is paid out gradually, rather than having to find a big lump sum means that it becomes affordable.

 

Whats's not to like ?

 

Do a forum search for "Ediesel", dozens of posts.

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It's not whether the user is willing to pay for it -- of course Porsche drivers will be! -- it's whether governments under severe pressure to improve energy efficiency will allow it to be widely used, if there's any much less wasteful way of storing the "spare" energy such as battery banks or plugged-in BEVs.

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1 hour ago, Mad Harold said:

There are several interesting avenues of research at present.BEV,Fuel  cell Hydrodgen,synthetic fuel,Hydrodgen paste.

Eventually,one or other will be found to be most efficient/greener/cheaper.

I look forward with interest.

 

If the energy source is renewable electricity, there's only one obvious candidate... 😉

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It would be great if we could keep a few diesel engines in boats, especially old engines in historic boats etc.   and steam railways etc

There is already HVO available now, a high quality diesel from renewable source with a claimed 90% reduction in CO2.

CO2/global warming can also be maybe sorted by suitable offsetting.

The problem is that any IC engine is going to produce some NOX (oxides of nitrogen) and any carbon based fuel is going to produce some smoke, and worrying about smoke is on the increase.

 

...............Dave

 

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16 hours ago, dmr said:

 

It would be great if we could keep a few diesel engines in boats, especially old engines in historic boats etc.   and steam railways etc

There is already HVO available now, a high quality diesel from renewable source with a claimed 90% reduction in CO2.

CO2/global warming can also be maybe sorted by suitable offsetting.

The problem is that any IC engine is going to produce some NOX (oxides of nitrogen) and any carbon based fuel is going to produce some smoke, and worrying about smoke is on the increase.

 

...............Dave

 

 

Porsche state :

 

The German sports car maker has been developing its own synthetic fuel - or eFuel - that it claims would cut CO2 emissions produced by internal combustion engines by as much as 85 per cent. 

The fuel would not require any modifications to a car and be compatible with both current and older vehicles - and it could make existing motors as clean as electric cars, when you take into account the carbon footprint created during production and supply.

 

 

If operational in 2022, Porsche says it could be producing 55 million litres of greener synthetic fuel by 2024, and as much as ten times that amount two years later. 

Commenting on the plans last year, Porsche CEO Oliver Blume reaffirmed that 'electromobility' remains the top priority at Porsche but eFuels for cars are a 'worthwhile complement to that' – as long as they’re produced in parts of the world where a 'surplus of sustainable energy is available'. 

'They are an additional element on the road to decarbonisation,' Blume said in December. 'Their advantages lie in their ease of application: eFuels can be used in combustion engines and plug-in hybrids, and can make use of the existing network of filling stations. 

'By using them, we can make a further contribution toward protecting the climate. As a maker of high-performance, efficient engines, we have broad technical expertise. We know exactly what fuel characteristics our engines need in order to operate with minimal impact on the climate. Our involvement in the world’s first commercial, integrated eFuels plant supports the development of the alternative fuels of the future.' 

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12 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

Porsche state :

 

The German sports car maker has been developing its own synthetic fuel - or eFuel - that it claims would cut CO2 emissions produced by internal combustion engines by as much as 85 per cent. 

The fuel would not require any modifications to a car and be compatible with both current and older vehicles - and it could make existing motors as clean as electric cars, when you take into account the carbon footprint created during production and supply.

 

 

I

 

 

As clean as electric? ..... That's a marketing or "aspirational" statement.

 

No engine modifications...so its a fuel with similar behaviour to existing fuel, so will produce NOx.

 

There are lots of possible loopholes, maybe they are talking petrol rather than diesel? where the catalyst already does a good job, and potentially electric cars will produce more rubber particulates due to increased mass, but I still reckon its not really true

 

.............Dave

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2 minutes ago, dmr said:

 

As clean as electric? ..... That's a marketing or "aspirational" statement.

 

No engine modifications...so its a fuel with similar behaviour to existing fuel, so will produce NOx.

 

There are lots of possible loopholes, maybe they are talking petrol rather than diesel? where the catalyst already does a good job, and potentially electric cars will produce more rubber particulates due to increased mass, but I still reckon its not really true

 

.............Dave

 

 

 

Not 100% 'clean' but it does look to be worthy of further investigation.

 

 

From ponds to power: $2M to perfect algae as diesel fuel | University of Michigan News (umich.edu)

 

  • Greenie 1
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7 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

 

 

Not 100% 'clean' but it does look to be worthy of further investigation.

 

 

From ponds to power: $2M to perfect algae as diesel fuel | University of Michigan News (umich.edu)

 

 

My fear is that the media is producing a culture of anti IC engine and anti wood burning stove (the Guardian already implies we are selfish) so even if engines and stoves are made to be much cleaner they still won't be acceptable.

 

...............Dave

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