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Matt&Jo

How long is your liveaboard boat and is it long enough

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I have a 62ft cruiser stern. It was the shortest space I could fit everything in how I wanted, and was built to my plan. I think it works well for me, with a "double length" saloon (ie two windows each side equating to about 15ft), 8ft galley, then there is a corner bath, bedroom, wc and study/2nd cabin. 

I often think, if I had a longer one, I'd have 2 more feet in the saloon (because I have a dining table in there which is a bit cramped), 2 more feet in the well deck (because mines a tad cramped for sitting out in) and 6ft for another cabin for guests.

But certainly, it depends on identifying how you will use the space then arranging it accordingly. If buying secondhand, look for something that if not perfect, you can see an easy way of adapting to your needs - moving too many bulkheads and re running pipes etc will be a pain.

When I was looking, all I wanted was a large lounge and a second bedroom, but I couldn't find anything. Far too many boats seem to have stupid wasted bits with half hearted wardrobes/storage/2nd bogs, utility areas etc.

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5 hours ago, Johny London said:

I have a 62ft cruiser stern. It was the shortest space I could fit everything in how I wanted, and was built to my plan. I think it works well for me, with a "double length" saloon (ie two windows each side equating to about 15ft), 8ft galley, then there is a corner bath, bedroom, wc and study/2nd cabin. 

I often think, if I had a longer one, I'd have 2 more feet in the saloon (because I have a dining table in there which is a bit cramped), 2 more feet in the well deck (because mines a tad cramped for sitting out in) and 6ft for another cabin for guests.

But certainly, it depends on identifying how you will use the space then arranging it accordingly. If buying secondhand, look for something that if not perfect, you can see an easy way of adapting to your needs - moving too many bulkheads and re running pipes etc will be a pain.

When I was looking, all I wanted was a large lounge and a second bedroom, but I couldn't find anything. Far too many boats seem to have stupid wasted bits with half hearted wardrobes/storage/2nd bogs, utility areas etc.

Your post does illustrate why there is  no definitive answer to this question. We all  want different  things. You class a utility area as wasted space when to us our utility room being forty feet away from our large saloon is one of the best parts of having a fab long boat. We have been for a couple of days looking online at 58 to 62 footers but have discounted the idea again as being too short as we  are used to the comfort afforded on this boat. Its strange I  find that lots of people seem to think they need big houses but only small boats innitt :cheers: 

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On 28/03/2018 at 23:08, Arthur Marshall said:

I lived on my 40 footer with a 23 foot cabin for quite a while, and had a friend who lived for about twenty years on a 35 foot boat (both of us on our own). A lot depends on what you can afford and how many of you there are...

I think you need less space than you think you do, after all you only use a small amount of it at any one time.  After that it depends on your hobbies and what clutter they involve.  Playing the trombone is tricky and the banjo is, thank god, almost impossible.  As for my wife's double bass...

It varies from person to person. I lived on a 45ft narrow boat for 3 years. Fine in summer when you can sit outside, but I found it claustrophobic in winter and used to disappear to the pub just to sit somewhere else, but virtually everywhere else you go costs money. Winter is the time when a bigger boat really comes into its own in terms of a more human internal space and a reduced sense cabin fever when it's pissing down with rain outside. But of course a bigger boat costs more to licence and heat and requires more maintenance.

Edited by blackrose
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This is the thing - for live aboard, my long lounge is well suited. And having a study gives an alternative place to go and sit and do things. If I was only on in the summer, a small saloon would easily suffice and without the study I'd be down to under 50ft. But no way for all year round!

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1 hour ago, Johny London said:

This is the thing - for live aboard, my long lounge is well suited. And having a study gives an alternative place to go and sit and do things. If I was only on in the summer, a small saloon would easily suffice and without the study I'd be down to under 50ft. But no way for all year round!

Agreed. Living aboard full time is far and away different from summer cruising or hobby boating. The boats need to be far more suited to  an individuals needs/wants.

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Its usable cabin space that is the yardstick.

We (2) have a 50 foot narrowboat with 14 foot saloon, cabin is 38 foot overall, Trad stern, reasonable cratch with cover so its usable.

Often thought of going bigger but it is the layout that makes the difference.

I look at some boats and think that without the shrine to a mid engine, the double dinette and the bath they would be better to live on.

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15 minutes ago, Boater Sam said:

Its usable cabin space that is the yardstick.

We (2) have a 50 foot narrowboat with 14 foot saloon, cabin is 38 foot overall, Trad stern, reasonable cratch with cover so its usable.

Often thought of going bigger but it is the layout that makes the difference.

I look at some boats and think that without the shrine to a mid engine, the double dinette and the bath they would be better to live on.

My  bro in law used to live in his house. He moved onto his hobby boat 2 years ago it is 67 feet long. It has a long tug deck an engine room for his antique method of propulsion and a "Back " cabin as now called and in effect he has had to have a dreaded cross bed fitted and still has nowhere near the comfort levels of my modern purpose built 68 foot liveaboard the space inside his against ours is a big difference.

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Some people live on board only as long as the first winter before scampering back to bricks and mortar. Others love it and will live on board as long as they can. Preferably being taken off in a wooden overcoat. Just read the rest of the post. Long as in length, not time, so ignore the above.

What others have said. In summer you spend as much time outdoors as in with the hatches open and a small space is fine. For a wet day in winter on board you need at least two separate usable spaces inside to get a change of scene, or a break from a partner every once in a while. I know people who have single cabin boats (ignoring the bathroom) who find the literal cabin fever looming on wet winter days.

Jen

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I must admit that having a 70foot is great for space , the only drawback I have found is that it can be difficult to moor in some locations , especially

in the built up areas 

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On 29/03/2018 at 23:00, dccruiser said:

I have a 60' reverse layout but with my bedroom before my lounge and a large walk through bathroom after the kitchen for just myself and my dog, have fitted it and refitted it several times over the last 2 years ... got rid of the dinette to extend the kitchen and fit a washer/dryer and freezer, added loads of storage and a small desk, now have more than adequate space due to a lot of planning, have a cruiser stern, but still plenty of cabin space, have friends on 57' boats and although its only 3' they seem so much smaller just because of the way they are fitted.

Rick

Agree entirely, 2 of us on board full time with 2 dogs . Our 60 footer has more than once been described as a TARDIS  by visiting 57 footer owners,, it's all about layout.

Phil 

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