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Wrinkley

2LW failed to start!

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After running my 2lw for around 4 hrs yesterday, we stopped the engine and had some lunch. 1hr or so restarted the engine which only ran for a few seconds and then petered out and stopped. Tried to restart only to be greeted with what sounded like a misfiring engine that would not run. After some time I traced fuel all the way until I took off the "ally bottle thing" mounted on the injector pump. No fuel appeared to be in the pump. Manually operated the fuel lift pump and filled the injector pump. Screwed the "ally bottle" back on and tried to start the engine. Fired first turn as usual and ran for the following 2 hrs till it was time to stop without missing a beat. Come to start the engine this morning and it would not start. Went straight for the ally bottle removed it, primed the pump, replaced ally bottle and it started up first turn. Engine ran great for around seven hours today. Spent a lot of time thinking and looking at the engine I cannot see how the air has got in. Engine has done about 1100 hrs. Any help would be greatfully recieved.

 

Graham

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Hi Graham

 

It could be a couple of things, firstly a leak somewhere allowing the air in and the fuel running back to tank (does yours have a day tank or is it directly fed from the main fuel tank). I would start with the joints between the fuel filter mounted on the end of the cylinder head (if yours has one) and the injector pump. my reason for this is even if the rest of the system drains back this should still have fuel in it, so the engine would start and then have problems when you draw the air through but in your post you mentioned that yours was empty at the pump end.

 

Secondly the diaphragm in the lift pump has failed and allowing the pump to leak and secondly on the outlet side of the lift pump there is a one way valve, this may be not be seating properly and allowing fuel to drain back (and wouldn't show any leaks)

 

Hope this helps for a start

 

Martyn

After running my 2lw for around 4 hrs yesterday, we stopped the engine and had some lunch. 1hr or so restarted the engine which only ran for a few seconds and then petered out and stopped. Tried to restart only to be greeted with what sounded like a misfiring engine that would not run. After some time I traced fuel all the way until I took off the "ally bottle thing" mounted on the injector pump. No fuel appeared to be in the pump. Manually operated the fuel lift pump and filled the injector pump. Screwed the "ally bottle" back on and tried to start the engine. Fired first turn as usual and ran for the following 2 hrs till it was time to stop without missing a beat. Come to start the engine this morning and it would not start. Went straight for the ally bottle removed it, primed the pump, replaced ally bottle and it started up first turn. Engine ran great for around seven hours today. Spent a lot of time thinking and looking at the engine I cannot see how the air has got in. Engine has done about 1100 hrs. Any help would be greatfully recieved.

 

Graham

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Hi Martyn

Thank you for the hints. I have checked all the joints from the tank, which is down on the base plate, including the ones on the fuel filter mounted on the end of the cylinder head and down to the injector pump. All seem to be ok. I have run the engine after priming the injector pump as before and closed the fuel tap mounted on the fuel tank. By doing this it will hopefully eliminate the lift pump diaphragm and the one way valve problems. I have taken of a small plate that covers a felt pad and washed it out as it was soaked in fuel. I have done this before when there was some fuel present. There was also some fuel drip on the end of the "rack" that joins the accelerator rod from the governor arm. I will leave the fuel turned off until the morning when I start the engine. This will hopefully show if the fuel is leaking back.

 

Graham

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Graham

 

Check to see if you are getting any fuel returned from the filter to the tank when operating the lift pump, easiest way is to remove the drain back pipe from the filter and operate the pump, if you dont get any fuel then most probably the 0.18" bleed hole has become blocked, this allows excess fuel and any air in the system to return to tank, I encountered this problem recently on a 3LW it exhibited pretty much the same symptons that you are describing, drilled a new hole (couldnt find the old one even with 100psi air connected) engine ran without any problems after. Hole should be at the back of the return to tank connection into the pump supply gallery,unfortunatly the manuals only tell you that it is at the highest point in the filter housing.

 

Steve

Edited by Split Pin

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Hi Martyn

Thank you for the hints. I have checked all the joints from the tank, which is down on the base plate, including the ones on the fuel filter mounted on the end of the cylinder head and down to the injector pump. All seem to be ok. I have run the engine after priming the injector pump as before and closed the fuel tap mounted on the fuel tank. By doing this it will hopefully eliminate the lift pump diaphragm and the one way valve problems. I have taken of a small plate that covers a felt pad and washed it out as it was soaked in fuel. I have done this before when there was some fuel present. There was also some fuel drip on the end of the "rack" that joins the accelerator rod from the governor arm. I will leave the fuel turned off until the morning when I start the engine. This will hopefully show if the fuel is leaking back.

 

Graham

 

It sounds as though your injector pump may be rather worn, so just possible it's allowing air in when standing. If you're still having trouble after all the other checks, maybe give that some thought.

 

Tim

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Update as the problem has now been sorted. Thank you all for you help and advice, I slowly worked my way through all of them that I could do but my problem still remained. This left Tim's suggestion. So I phoned Wash's up as they rebuilt the engine originally who made a number of suggestions all of which I had tried. So they said they would come and collect the lift pump, sprayers and the injection pump to test and repair as required. Next day items returned, fitted and engine runs/starts fine now. The injector pump was at fault. Very pleased with the service.

 

Again thank you all

 

Graham

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Update as the problem has now been sorted. Thank you all for you help and advice, I slowly worked my way through all of them that I could do but my problem still remained. This left Tim's suggestion. So I phoned Wash's up as they rebuilt the engine originally who made a number of suggestions all of which I had tried. So they said they would come and collect the lift pump, sprayers and the injection pump to test and repair as required. Next day items returned, fitted and engine runs/starts fine now. The injector pump was at fault. Very pleased with the service.

 

Again thank you all

 

Graham

 

I've yet to hear anyone with a bad word to say about Walsh's.

 

Shame they only do Gardners, but then that's probably the reason they are so good at what they do. Pick a narrow field and become expert in it. A very good business strategy in my experience.

 

 

MtB

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Walsh's are indeed a reputable firm, but their activities go far beyond Gardners: they overhaul/ repair many buses and other commercial vehicles which have non-Gardner engines.

 

I do have one criticism of them: the paint which they apply to engines (at least to mine) is crap. Luckily a tin of Gardner Grey from Redshaw's has got the beastie looking more presentable again.

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I've yet to hear anyone with a bad word to say about Walsh's.

 

Shame they only do Gardners, but then that's probably the reason they are so good at what they do. Pick a narrow field and become expert in it. A very good business strategy in my experience.

 

 

MtB

 

I do wonder, if they rebuilt the engine, why it needed the work?

 

Edit - unless it's done thousands of hours since, of course.

 

Tim

Edited by Timleech

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I bought my 3LW engine from Walsh's in 2009, well before my boat was started.

The engine didn't get run till September 2012 when I noticed a leak in the welding on the top water rail.

(It had been extended to make a 2LW rail into a 3LW which were not easily available in 2009).

 

I returned the faulty rail to Walsh's who decided that it was not worth repairing but interpreted my "one" year warranty generously, sourced a brand new one and sent a genuine Gardner trained mechanic to fit it.

Edited by andywatson

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Walsh's are indeed a reputable firm, but their activities go far beyond Gardners: they overhaul/ repair many buses and other commercial vehicles which have non-Gardner engines.

 

I do have one criticism of them: the paint which they apply to engines (at least to mine) is crap. Luckily a tin of Gardner Grey from Redshaw's has got the beastie looking more presentable again.

Noticed the paint on mine (Walsh) is doing same (peeled off in places). How did you prep it before applying the new?

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I am no p&d expert, but.....

Washed it down to remove any oil, grease etc., removed loose paint with a stiff brush then sanded the engine down (which, because of the nooks and crannies involved, has to be done the hard way, no space to wield a sanding block!)

After a year or so, the paint still adheres and still looks smart.

Edited by Athy

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Ok cheers Athy. I fancy a go at that might use a little dremmel or something for the little corners etc.

 

No primer? how many coats?

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I thought Dremmel was a town in Germany until I discovered Smirnoff.

(By which I mean that I have no idea what it is).

Redshaw's Gardner grey enamel goes on nice and thickly, I needed only one coat and yes, you can apply it directly to the metal.

 

(I await with trepidation a reply from a gentleman in Scotland who will put down his single malt and say Noooooo! You mustn't do that!) But it's worked for me so far.

 

Mike

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