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60 years of change.


Speedwheel
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Right, left and centre justification I can handle, it's getting the tabs sorted out on common lines so as to have two addresses at the top of a page that bedevils me. Yes there's a way, but the easier route is often taken.

 

Interestingly, a little known fact about DDT is that during the period of time it was banned as an insecticide in Third World countries (primarily Africa and Asia), over forty million people died of the resurgence of Malaria. There is undoubtedly a hazard in overexposure to DDT, especially where it is sprayed within buildings, but weighed against such significant numbers of deaths in Africa since the banning in the early seventies is no justification for an outright ban.

 

The 'Popular Press'? One occasionally scans gifted papers before lighting the fire with them. B)

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Right, left and centre justification I can handle, it's getting the tabs sorted out on common lines so as to have two addresses at the top of a page that bedevils me. Yes there's a way, but the easier route is often taken.

 

Interestingly, a little known fact about DDT is that during the period of time it was banned as an insecticide in Third World countries (primarily Africa and Asia), over forty million people died of the resurgence of Malaria. There is undoubtedly a hazard in overexposure to DDT, especially where it is sprayed within buildings, but weighed against such significant numbers of deaths in Africa since the banning in the early seventies is no justification for an outright ban.

 

The 'Popular Press'? One occasionally scans gifted papers before lighting the fire with them. B)

Yes, there are often no easy answers and food production is no exception. DDT seemed to cure some problems and create some more. The point I was making was that crop spraying is hardly new, and was being carried out 50+ years ago.

 

Firelighting is the best use of any newspaper in my opinion.

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We'll stick to firelighting then! Though a Flit Gun might fetch a bob or two on Ebay.

 

Going back to that shot of RALEIGH (?) and maybe FRIENDSHIP, I don't recall seeing Joe Skinner in anything but a Trilby. That chaps got a cap on methinks. But if it is the Skinner's, maybe Rose has been at it with a 'dolly tub' in the day boat alongside!

 

Edited for spelling error and I should have said 'I don't recall seeing a picture of Joe Skinner . .' etc. Never had the pleasure of meeting him personally.

Edited by Derek R.
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Going back to that shot of RALIEGH (?) and maybe FRIENDSHIP, I don't recall seeing Joe Skinner in anything but a Trilby. That chaps got a cap on methinks. But if it is the Skinner's, maybe Rose has been at it with a 'dolly tub' in the day boat alongside!

I am sure the photograph of CAPRICORN / RALEIGH / FRIENDSHIP can be dated to 1948. I have records of Oxford Canal traffic from the 1940's and 1950's which shows CAPRICORN and RALEIGH being paired for a very short period of time and loading at Griff Colliery on 20 June 1948, arriving in Oxford on 22 June (CAPRICORN for Morrells, Nelson Wharf and RALEIGH for Co-op, Dawson Wharf). At this time CAPRICORN and RALEIGH were under the 'captaincy' of the Grantham family. By the end of July 1948 the Grantham's had turned CAPRICORN in for the S.E. Barlow motor BLAKE (exG.U.C.C.Co. Ltd. MIZAR), and most likely CAPRICORN was returned to 'British Waterways'. By the time of Queen Elizabeth's coronation CAPRICORN was on loan to the maintenance department of 'British Waterways' with whom it remained until being sold in 1964.

 

S.E. Barlow's RALEIGH was previously John Harwood's SEARCHLIGHT and had been paired for several years with the former F.M.C. Ltd. PRINCE, again on Oxford Canal coal traffic.

Edited by pete harrison
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I loved the 1950s - proper trains hauled by steam engines,

 

Funny you should say that.....

Today 3/06/12, at the boat yard, surprised to see Duchess of Sutherland plus support coach, then later Deltic D9000,light engine. Me working on a 1940's Herbert lathe making parts for a 1949 Ruston crane. Don't need memories, just haven't got into the 21century yet. Except for this Mac thing.

Bill

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Hi. I am new here. I have seen all the pics they are really very nice. Did you click these pics or you got it somewhere else? Really after seeing the pics I wish that may be I was in these beautiful pictures.

Reported.

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I have had to sit down for a while; I'm not accustomed to people agreeing with me :)

 

My sister, a keen historian too, argues that we can learn so much from history and hopefully shape the future using that knowledge.

 

 

Toilet paper? You were lucky! We had to manage with last years telephone directory hung on a string!

Blimey you were posh having a phone, it was a walk to button "A" & "B" box for us. We had the Radio Times on a nail.

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Yes indeedy! Before it became a 'glossy'. And four pennies for a phone call. Our nearest was Wood Green Tube station just 100yds away. A row of brown cubicles with two piece concertina doors. Directories were bolted into a hinged frame. Always a good place to hang around if cold on a winters day, you got a regular blast of warm air from the trains as they pulled into the station below - and a most distinctive smell of - ozone? Accompanied by all the sounds so familiar from childhood memories - and Trolleybuses!

 

A tuppeny ha'penny stamp on a postcard was also a quick way to communicate. Posted before midday it would be through the recipients letterbox next morning - no 'first' and 'second' class! Letters were 3d. And Telegram boys on BSA Bantams! There's a cracking good Post Office museum in the Blists Hill Victorian Village at Ironbridge. Not only got a Bantam in there, but a one eigth scale model of an articulated travelling Post Office - pretty big, lots of detail. All above the old Post Office on site.

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The Daily Mail images recall the changing face of Britain in these 60 years. But, there is also a link with the Royal Jubilee Pageant on Sunday, when though wet, the organisation of such an event deserves credit and respect for carrying it out. Also all those craft that took part. Their crew and masters also deserve a big thank you for attending. There were some 43 narrow boats, also barges and coatal vessels including the 1808 built Oyster Boat, Boadicea. In the televised pictures of Craft passing Tower Bridge about 17.15 on Sunday afternoon there was a boat in Samual Barlow livery, I see. The Daily Mail 60 year ago montage also featured a Samuel Barlow butty tied up beside a Grand Union Motor in Warwickshire. It is difficult to read the name, but she was registered at Tamworth. Yet looking at A.H Faulkeners book on Barlows, it is difficult to find a match.

 

Ray Shill

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The Daily Mail 60 year ago montage also featured a Samuel Barlow butty tied up beside a Grand Union Motor in Warwickshire. It is difficult to read the name, but she was registered at Tamworth. Yet looking at A.H Faulkeners book on Barlows, it is difficult to find a match.

 

Are we talking about the picture in the link in the first post ?

 

Surely it has to be "Raleigh", as has already been said ?

 

Could your issue with matching it to a fleet list be that you are comparing to a "Samuel Barlow Coal carrying Company" list, whereas the boat pictured is liveried as the fleet of "S E Barlow" ?

 

I'm out of my depth here, these are not fleets I know about, but despite the similar name and livery, two quite distinct fleets, I thought ?

 

About to get told I know nowt about "Barlows" boats, I suspect!

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Are we talking about the picture in the link in the first post ?

 

Surely it has to be "Raleigh", as has already been said ?

 

Could your issue with matching it to a fleet list be that you are comparing to a "Samuel Barlow Coal carrying Company" list, whereas the boat pictured is liveried as the fleet of "S E Barlow" ?

 

I'm out of my depth here, these are not fleets I know about, but despite the similar name and livery, two quite distinct fleets, I thought ?

 

About to get told I know nowt about "Barlows" boats, I suspect!

 

Spot on Alan, its an S E boat. Pete has already given us the full breakdown on this. Using the "Barlows" book is like walking in a minefield as far as full info is concerned.

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  • 8 years later...

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