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Electric boat for sale


ditchcrawler

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On 09/04/2023 at 13:48, Athy said:

Does anyone on the canals really want that? The sound of a diesel engine, be it a burping Bolinder or a bumbling Barrus, is part of the attraction and ambience of the inland waterways. Are there people who actually wish to pay far more money for something completely lacking in character? I suppose the ability to scare the bejasus out of waterside fishermen may be an advantage for some, but that pleasure comes at a high price.

 

If you hanker after a traditional engine sound and have an electric boat you could record the sound of the engine of your choice and play it on a continuous loop.

 

Why you record several and swap the sound to suit your mood... 😂

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39 minutes ago, cuthound said:

 

If you hanker after a traditional engine sound and have an electric boat you could record the sound of the engine of your choice and play it on a continuous loop.

 

Why you record several and swap the sound to suit your mood... 😂

Ooh, several good candidates here -- Rolls-Royce Merlin, Chrysler Hemi, Ferrari V12, BRM V16, Bolinder, Gresley A4, a Big Boy going up Cheyenne... 😉

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11 minutes ago, IanD said:

Ooh, several good candidates here -- Rolls-Royce Merlin, Chrysler Hemi, Ferrari V12, BRM V16, Bolinder, Gresley A4, a Big Boy going up Cheyenne... 😉

 

The A4 Sir Nigel Gresley went past us on the WCML last week. Beautiful sight, smell and sound.

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1 hour ago, cuthound said:

 

If you hanker after a traditional engine sound and have an electric boat you could record the sound of the engine of your choice and play it on a continuous loop.

 

Why you record several and swap the sound to suit your mood... 😂

How about a Hornby sound chip, you could have a choice of steam and diesels

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Haven't read the whole thread, but I reckon a series hybrid is the perfect setup for most liveaboards with no shore power. You'd have a very large 48v (so off-the-shelf chargers/inverters can be used) lifepo4 bank shared between propulsion and leisure, a near-silent encapsulated 8kva 240v variable speed generator and an 10kw ish electric motor driving the prop. And as much solar as the roof can fit. The idea is that the battery bank rarely gets charged to 100%, which is perfect for maximum life of a lifepo4 bank.

 

In winter when the solar isn't doing much, to charge the batteries to cover domestic usage, you now have a diesel engine running at near maximum efficiency as it's under load right until the very end of the charge cycle. Quite unlike your average Beta 38 with a 120a alternator being run in idle to charge a lithium bank at a fraction of the speed. And for heavy 240v loads like the washing machine, you can just run the generator. An average liveaboard uses 1kwh a day, so assuming there's zero solar, 1hr of generator running would cover 4 days of usage.

 

1.5kw of panels on the roof will still leave enough room on most 50'+ boats for some storage, and it'll yield around 6kwh per day in the peak of summer; assuming you cruise every weekend for a 7hr day, in summer you'll rarely need to the run the generator. A 8kva generator would only put just under two hours of cruising time into the batteries for every hour of runtime, but this is supplemented by solar for 8 months of the year. Putting the generator on to run the washing machine a couple of days before cruising would cover 3-4hrs of propulsion alone.

 

...oh if I had the time I'd love to do something like the above! 

 

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3 minutes ago, cheesegas said:

Haven't read the whole thread, but I reckon a series hybrid is the perfect setup for most liveaboards with no shore power. You'd have a very large 48v (so off-the-shelf chargers/inverters can be used) lifepo4 bank shared between propulsion and leisure, a near-silent encapsulated 8kva 240v variable speed generator and an 10kw ish electric motor driving the prop. And as much solar as the roof can fit. The idea is that the battery bank rarely gets charged to 100%, which is perfect for maximum life of a lifepo4 bank.

 

In winter when the solar isn't doing much, to charge the batteries to cover domestic usage, you now have a diesel engine running at near maximum efficiency as it's under load right until the very end of the charge cycle. Quite unlike your average Beta 38 with a 120a alternator being run in idle to charge a lithium bank at a fraction of the speed. And for heavy 240v loads like the washing machine, you can just run the generator. An average liveaboard uses 1kwh a day, so assuming there's zero solar, 1hr of generator running would cover 4 days of usage.

 

1.5kw of panels on the roof will still leave enough room on most 50'+ boats for some storage, and it'll yield around 6kwh per day in the peak of summer; assuming you cruise every weekend for a 7hr day, in summer you'll rarely need to the run the generator. A 8kva generator would only put just under two hours of cruising time into the batteries for every hour of runtime, but this is supplemented by solar for 8 months of the year. Putting the generator on to run the washing machine a couple of days before cruising would cover 3-4hrs of propulsion alone.

 

...oh if I had the time I'd love to do something like the above! 

 

I have done it, so much fun and games were had! I have 5kw of solar 36kwhs of drive lifepo4s at 72 volts, nearly 10 kwhs of domestic lifepo4s at 24 volts. A 6kw generator which heats water and will also do the central heating if left on long enough! The 72 volts batteries can charge the 24 volts battery bank via a DC to DC charger, winter this year I used about 25 litres of diesel  to make up the shortfall from solar. Mine is a widebeam with wheelhouse so I have a bigger electric motor to cruise with than 10 KW 

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12 minutes ago, cheesegas said:

Haven't read the whole thread, but I reckon a series hybrid is the perfect setup for most liveaboards with no shore power. You'd have a very large 48v (so off-the-shelf chargers/inverters can be used) lifepo4 bank shared between propulsion and leisure, a near-silent encapsulated 8kva 240v variable speed generator and an 10kw ish electric motor driving the prop. And as much solar as the roof can fit. The idea is that the battery bank rarely gets charged to 100%, which is perfect for maximum life of a lifepo4 bank.

 

In winter when the solar isn't doing much, to charge the batteries to cover domestic usage, you now have a diesel engine running at near maximum efficiency as it's under load right until the very end of the charge cycle. Quite unlike your average Beta 38 with a 120a alternator being run in idle to charge a lithium bank at a fraction of the speed. And for heavy 240v loads like the washing machine, you can just run the generator. An average liveaboard uses 1kwh a day, so assuming there's zero solar, 1hr of generator running would cover 4 days of usage.

 

1.5kw of panels on the roof will still leave enough room on most 50'+ boats for some storage, and it'll yield around 6kwh per day in the peak of summer; assuming you cruise every weekend for a 7hr day, in summer you'll rarely need to the run the generator. A 8kva generator would only put just under two hours of cruising time into the batteries for every hour of runtime, but this is supplemented by solar for 8 months of the year. Putting the generator on to run the washing machine a couple of days before cruising would cover 3-4hrs of propulsion alone.

 

...oh if I had the time I'd love to do something like the above! 

 

That's pretty much what I will have -- 48V 700Ah LFP bank, cocooned 9kVA generator, 2kW of solar (7kWh/day in summer, maybe 1.5kWh/day in winter), 15kW continuous motor, 10kVA inverter/charger. Looking at actual power use when cruising all day, I expect to need to run the generator for about an hour a day when cruising all day in summer, or getting on for 2h per cruising day in winter. If cruising is only a couple of days per week (or a few hours per day every day) then solar will provide all the power needed in summer, generator will still be needed in winter -- but running the genny for an hour will also give a full tank of hot water. No need to run the generator for any electrical load including cooking and washing, batteries and inverter can cope just fine.

 

LFP battery bank life for a boat is simply not an issue so long as you don't spend much time at 100% (or go below 0%, obviously...), they'll probably outlast the rest of the boat even for a full-time liveaboard.

Edited by IanD
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On 12/04/2023 at 18:56, peterboat said:

These batteries will I suspect be ideal for boats 

 

And probably most applications where cost is most important, especially because they use cheap plentiful sodium not more expensive rarer lithium, which will be a plus as volumes carry on going up.

 

Might take some time to happen though, especially a big price drop -- and in the meantime LFP is fine for boats 🙂

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