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Removing curtains near new cooker


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8 hours ago, bizzard said:

The curtains could be made from an old fire blanket.

Is there anything to say that a fire blanket has to be kept in its holder and not hung up ready for instant use. If you use plastic rings with a cooker fire they would melt and drop the blanket over the cooker.

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17 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

Is there anything to say that a fire blanket has to be kept in its holder and not hung up ready for instant use. If you use plastic rings with a cooker fire they would melt and drop the blanket over the cooker.

 

Maybe not a good idea to reply on curtains as your main fire-blanket, in the event of a fire you'd need to lean over the fire to get to the blanket - by the time the self-launching blanket (melting rings) had taken place the fire may be to large to contain.

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15 minutes ago, bizzard said:

Good gratious, have some sense folks. One would use all metal hangers and rails not plastic ! No wonder they had to bring in the BSS. :(

 

I suspect the suggestion of plastic rings was so it if all got a bit too hot in one's hob area, the rings would melt and automatically deploy the fire blanket, saving one the trouble and effort of deploying it manually. Especially is one was say, gazing out of another window absentmindedly whilst waiting for the kettle to boil.

 

 

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10 minutes ago, MtB said:

 

I suspect the suggestion of plastic rings was so it if all got a bit too hot in one's hob area, the rings would melt and automatically deploy the fire blanket, saving one the trouble and effort of deploying it manually. Especially is one was say, gazing out of another window absentmindedly whilst waiting for the kettle to boil.

 

Or standing on a box hanging over the cooker drying your hair.

 

1 minute ago, bizzard said:

 

Or standing on a box hanging over the cooker drying your hair.

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3 hours ago, MtB said:

 

I suspect the suggestion of plastic rings was so it if all got a bit too hot in one's hob area, the rings would melt and automatically deploy the fire blanket, saving one the trouble and effort of deploying it manually. Especially is one was say, gazing out of another window absentmindedly whilst waiting for the kettle to boil.

 

 

Thank you

How about having a high pressure water mist to keep the curtain wet all the time

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10 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

Thank you

How about having a high pressure water mist to keep the curtain wet all the time

 

Just keep the kettle boiling all the time - the water vapour will do the same job.

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Thanks for all the comments and ideas! To clarify - I have always been a little uneasy about the existing arrangement regardless of what the elfs say, and I'm also a little uneasy about the BSS approach as I can't see how it can be applied to new appliances which haven't had the chance to set fire to the boat! 

 

I can see in the short term it may well be an old fire blanket that I use, the present curtains roll up rather than pull sideways and it would be easy enough to rig the old fireblanket (which is being replaced anyway) to do the same. Longer term probably an fire resistant roller blind. It has occurred to me following this that there may be other places blinds would work well - when every Viking I've ever seen has had curtains one tends to forget what other options there might be. 

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In the 1970's there had been a spate of chip pan fires, and a TV programme  had demonstrated how to put them out using a water-soaked tea-towel . Shortly after, mum had her first and only chip pan flare-up and succesfully used that method. Her fire had been caused by a saucepan on an adjacent burner where she had used an inverted dinner plate as the lid. The plate had slightly overhung the chip pan and condensation had caused water to run down to the edge of the plate and drip into the hot oil. 

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5 hours ago, Ronaldo47 said:

In the 1970's there had been a spate of chip pan fires, and a TV programme  had demonstrated how to put them out using a water-soaked tea-towel . Shortly after, mum had her first and only chip pan flare-up and succesfully used that method.  

I have done that, Next door went to Yarmouth races and left the chip pan on the stove, luckily my company had given me a day off to revise for exams. We lived in a terraced house and spotted the smoke, so broke in and gave it the wet towel treatment while the wife went to dial 999 at the phone box.

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5 hours ago, Ronaldo47 said:

In the 1970's there had been a spate of chip pan fires, and a TV programme  had demonstrated how to put them out using a water-soaked tea-towel . Shortly after, mum had her first and only chip pan flare-up and succesfully used that method. Her fire had been caused by a saucepan on an adjacent burner where she had used an inverted dinner plate as the lid. The plate had slightly overhung the chip pan and condensation had caused water to run down to the edge of the plate and drip into the hot oil. 

On TV In the 70’s we used to have lots of warnings about all sorts on. Remember the man drilling with a dodgy drill with the plug in water? He got a shock. 
All sorts of fire warnings too, with ones telling us to switch the Christmas tree lights off at bed time.
Lots of public information warnings. Where are they now? There was an endless list of them. 
Green Cross Code man, Charlie the Cat and so on. Hundreds of them
 

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