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Electrical mental block


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Brain has filed and cannot retrieve information 

what the formula steps to convert AC wattage to DC amperage .. I know I have to build a loss factor in for inverter etc. 

I can do the i = v/r etc but how to transpose 230v ac to 12 v dc 

brain dead fool 

I need wine 

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1 minute ago, Loddon said:

 

Will it help or confuse you more ?

Thanks j 

1 minute ago, ditchcrawler said:

People say if you work it out as 10 volts DC it allows for the inefficiencies so 1000 Watts is 100 Amps

Thank you I couldn’t remember the average ....

back to calcs 

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14 minutes ago, Chris-B said:

Brain has filed and cannot retrieve information 

what the formula steps to convert AC wattage to DC amperage .. I know I have to build a loss factor in for inverter etc. 

I can do the i = v/r etc but how to transpose 230v ac to 12 v dc 

brain dead fool 

I need wine 

If you think in Watts, then simply decide the voltage you interested in and calculate the current to suit using W=IV.  If going through an inverter or transformer than add on say 10% for losses. 

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2 hours ago, ditchcrawler said:

People say if you work it out as 10 volts DC it allows for the inefficiencies so 1000 Watts is 100 Amps

Absolutely. That might err on being slightly pessimistic but that’s a good thing. 

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I'd be a bit careful about generalising about alternating current.

 

it is very unpredictable and jumps all over the place, one moment this way, next moment that way.  in fact if you are a mathematician looking at the sine wave curve you could persuade yourself that it isn't really there at all.

I was brought up on 4.5v batteries that I put in my bicycle headlight - much easier to understand.       :rolleyes:

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2 hours ago, Murflynn said:

 

I was brought up on 4.5v batteries that I put in my bicycle headlight - much easier to understand.   

 

All my youthful electrical experimentation was powered by those Ever Ready 4.5V batteries with screw terminals on the top.

battery_126_1434333.jpg

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