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Cromwell to Torksey


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11 minutes ago, MartynG said:

Fossdyke as the shallow depth alarm sounds all too often.

Although the 'agreed' Dredging on the Fossdyke is a minimum of 5 feet depth I got stuck at Saxilby - it was touch and go from Torksey, but at Saxilby that was the end for us.

Managed to 'pole off' turn around, stopped the night (nice Pizza - delivered to the boat) and back to the Trent.

(I draw 4.5 feet)

Edited by Alan de Enfield
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all this talk about  using charts that havent been updated for years,,the sand bars move just about every time  the trent floods  just  keep to middle   and dont cut  corners  

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13 minutes ago, MartynG said:

Its usual  for cruisers capable of travelling on the sea to have a speed through the water and depth gauge . We also have GPS speed over ground is handy to see how much speed you are getting when going with the tide - or losing when against  the tide .

I noticed a narrowboat entering West Stockwith the other day had the same equipment . That is unusual I think. It would be a bit pointless on a canal and not exactly cheap. I usually switch my depth gauge   off on the  Fossdyke as the shallow depth alarm sounds all too often.

In a narrowboat it must be tempting to cut the corners on the Trent - but obviously best avoided .

You may be suprised to hear that some people have too much money now on narrowboats, so much so that some also actualy fit completely nonsense bits of kit such as bowthrusters :o yep you heard me correctly, bowthruster on a piddly 70 foot narrowboat and sometimes even shorter :rolleyes:

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1 hour ago, mrsmelly said:

You may be suprised to hear that some people have too much money now on narrowboats, so much so that some also actualy fit completely nonsense bits of kit such as bowthrusters :o yep you heard me correctly, bowthruster on a piddly 70 foot narrowboat and sometimes even shorter :rolleyes:

I don't have bowthrusters, so obviously I find them utterly pointless and I have nothing but disdain for those who have them.  (But secretly, I'd quite like them)

Stern thrusters are simply beyond the pale though.

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1 hour ago, mrsmelly said:

You may be suprised to hear that some people have too much money now on narrowboats, so much so that some also actualy fit completely nonsense bits of kit such as bowthrusters :o yep you heard me correctly, bowthruster on a piddly 70 foot narrowboat and sometimes even shorter :rolleyes:

C'mon - repost that in 9 months (less 3 days) time and someone may fall for it.

1 hour ago, denboy said:

all this talk about  using charts that havent been updated for years,,the sand bars move just about every time  the trent floods  just  keep to middle   and dont cut  corners  

Sound advice if you are running a recovery service - otherwise a load of tosh !!!

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2 hours ago, MartynG said:

Its usual  for cruisers capable of travelling on the sea to have a speed through the water and depth gauge . We also have GPS speed over ground is handy to see how much speed you are getting when going with the tide - or losing when against  the tide .

I noticed a narrowboat entering West Stockwith the other day had the same equipment . That is unusual I think. It would be a bit pointless on a canal and not exactly cheap. I usually switch my depth gauge   off on the  Fossdyke as the shallow depth alarm sounds all too often.

In a narrowboat it must be tempting to cut the corners on the Trent - but obviously best avoided .

We just turned the shallow water alarm off rather then not using the Tridata. 

2 hours ago, denboy said:

all this talk about  using charts that havent been updated for years,,the sand bars move just about every time  the trent floods  just  keep to middle   and dont cut  corners  

Do you like grounding your boat?

2 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

Although the 'agreed' Dredging on the Fossdyke is a minimum of 5 feet depth I got stuck at Saxilby - it was touch and go from Torksey, but at Saxilby that was the end for us.

Managed to 'pole off' turn around, stopped the night (nice Pizza - delivered to the boat) and back to the Trent.

(I draw 4.5 feet)

The Dutch cruisers we are normally with draw 4ft. They don't seem to have any problems. 

That extra half ft must make all the difference!

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4 minutes ago, Naughty Cal said:

We just turned the shallow water alarm off rather then not using the Tridata. 

Do you like grounding your boat?

The Dutch cruisers we are normally with draw 4ft. They don't seem to have any problems. 

That extra half ft must make all the difference!

That 6" is always important.

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3 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:
5 hours ago, mrsmelly said:

You may be suprised to hear that some people have too much money now on narrowboats, so much so that some also actualy fit completely nonsense bits of kit such as bowthrusters :o yep you heard me correctly, bowthruster on a piddly 70 foot narrowboat and sometimes even shorter :rolleyes:

C'mon - repost that in 9 months (less 3 days) time and someone may fall for it.

5 hours ago, denboy said:

all this talk about  using charts that havent been updated for years,,the sand bars move just about every time  the trent floods  just  keep to middle   and dont cut  corners  

Sound advice if you are running a recovery service - otherwise a load of tosh !!!

really,,, so you  know where  all the sand gravel bars are every winter after the  floods ?

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my mistake  been doing it all wrong for last 20 years ,getting stuck once rescuing a   boat  with a guy with boat masters certificate following the "chart", and once on gravel bar bottom of lock which wasnt there  the week before 

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1 hour ago, denboy said:

my mistake  been doing it all wrong for last 20 years ,getting stuck once rescuing a   boat  with a guy with boat masters certificate following the "chart", and once on gravel bar bottom of lock which wasnt there  the week before 

Only twenty years!! you will get the hang of it when you gain the experience.

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Not an underwater obstruction, but can I just warn anyone using the visitor mooring below Newark Nether lock of the overhang which can rake your boat above gunwale height and in my case ripped my bathroom ventilator right off (just after you passed me, John6767). :(

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6 hours ago, Mac of Cygnet said:

Not an underwater obstruction, but can I just warn anyone using the visitor mooring below Newark Nether lock of the overhang which can rake your boat above gunwale height and in my case ripped my bathroom ventilator right off (just after you passed me, John6767). :(

The high wall in Newark is no fun either.

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2 minutes ago, noddyboater said:

That overhang can be very dodgy if you moor overnight or leave the boat unattended with the river rising. 

Went down last winter - not saying the water level was high, but, the Lock Keeper (?) had tied floats on strings to the tops of the ladders as nothing could be seen of the wall or the ladder tops.

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20 hours ago, denboy said:

my mistake  been doing it all wrong for last 20 years ,getting stuck once rescuing a   boat  with a guy with boat masters certificate following the "chart", and once on gravel bar bottom of lock which wasnt there  the week before 

If you stick to the middle of the river as per your advice at either Fledborough or Normanton you will land yourself firmly on a shoal!

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2 minutes ago, Naughty Cal said:

If you stick to the middle of the river as per your advice at either Fledborough or Normanton you will land yourself firmly on a shoal!

But, no doubt, the excuse will be "it wasn't there when I did the Trent 20 years ago".

As in most things there are those who 'do' and those who 'talk about it'.

  • Greenie 1
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34 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

Went down last winter - not saying the water level was high, but, the Lock Keeper (?) had tied floats on strings to the tops of the ladders as nothing could be seen of the wall or the ladder tops.

Are you sure it wasn't a concerned boater who did that?   All the "lockies" I've met there recently would have told you in a pompous manner that it's far too dangerous to even think about boating in those conditions and are you aware it's an offence to not clearly display your licence at both sides of the vessel?..

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12 minutes ago, noddyboater said:

Are you sure it wasn't a concerned boater who did that?  

No - hence my ?

All the "lockies" I've met there recently would have told you in a pompous manner that it's far too dangerous to even think about boating in those conditions

Well they may have a point - seeing as a NB was rolled under the Dolphins the previous week at Stoke Bardolph when they had insufficient power to turn into the lock approach.

 and are you aware it's an offence to not clearly display your licence at both sides of the vessel?..

And they would be correct.

 

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The story of the N/boat that went over Stoke weir makes a strong case for the return of EXPERIENCED keepers on all Trent locks don't you think?  I doubt the unfortunate boat would have been anywhere near Stoke lock if advice had been given at Meadow lane or Holme.

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5 minutes ago, noddyboater said:

The story of the N/boat that went over Stoke weir makes a strong case for the return of EXPERIENCED keepers on all Trent locks don't you think?  I doubt the unfortunate boat would have been anywhere near Stoke lock if advice had been given at Meadow lane or Holme.

Absolutely..

When talking with them - that was their argument.

"We told everyone at Castle Marina we were leaving, there was no-one at Meadow Lane lock and we knew nothing about 'red-boards', in fact no one every mentioned the dangers - someone should have told us".

Its a fine line between the freedoms we demand, as boaters, and being restricted by 'jobs-worths'.

Their boat was a bit of a mess but they were very fortunate that neither of them were killed.

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Castle Marina does seem to avoid giving any advice to new owners regarding the river. 

I met a couple at cranfleet a few years ago who were having a look around as they were taking their new purchase from Castle up there tomorrow. I pointed out that the river was rising fast and I'd just had quite a hard time coming up from Beeston on amber. They were totally clueless to what I was saying and admitted they hadn't even been on a boat before and didn't realise you went "upstream" from Beeston!

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