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Ben69

Measurements used to predict frost and potential damage

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Next year my boat will be in the river over winter. i plan to keep the engine heated in some manner.

 

However, is temperature the only measurement needed to predict what's coming or should I be looking at dew point and river currents too?

 

Thanks

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Temperature is the most important factor. You need to know how cold it gets in your boat and for how long. I have a couple of electric heaters in my boat, one is on a frost setting and one is operated remotely by phone. But, if your engine and central heating contain enough anti-freeze you probably shouldn't worry. I do try and empty the fresh water piping as much as possible and turn off the pressure pump and leave all taps and shower valves open.

 

I can recommend the iSocket Pro as a GSM enabled device which will monitor temp and (optionally) bilge level. It can switch a 13A socket on and off remotely or according to rules, such as

Edited by mross

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As mross said correct antifreeze should protect the engine and central heating. As your location is Caversham I'm assuming the river is the Thames in which case you might want to keep an eye on river levels and flows. These are available at the EA site.

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Next year my boat will be in the river over winter. i plan to keep the engine heated in some manner.

However, is temperature the only measurement needed to predict what's coming or should I be looking at dew point and river currents too?

Thanks

Goodness, no wonder you will need to keep it heated although I suspect that will be the least of your problems

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Next year my boat will be in the river over winter. i plan to keep the engine heated in some manner.

However, is temperature the only measurement needed to predict what's coming or should I be looking at dew point and river currents too?

Thanks

Why do you need to keep it heated? I have never heated the engine ole on any if my boats over winter and have never had problems starting them. You are in the softie south if you are at Caversham and its highly unlikely the river will freeze over. As others have said make sure you have the right concentration of antifreeze and there should be no problem. Put a coat on the engine if you're worried about damp.

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Thank you for the responses thus far. May I add that I have a 1964 raw water cooled petrol yoghurt pot. FYI i am a northerner that lives in the south, however the local folk advise me to buy tube heaters etc ... I should add that I am a total noob at this hence why I am posting in the noob forum :) ty

Edited by Ben69

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with the flooding we've had in recent years I would have thought river levels would have been the greatest concern.

 

As others have stated , if the antifreeze level is ok then you should have nothing to worry about.

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This may be of interest as Winterising a boat has been discussed before, have a look at :-

 

http://www.canalworld.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=72947&hl=%2Bwinterising+%2Bgrp

http://www.canalworld.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=86891&hl=winterising#entry1874858

http://www.canalworld.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=80654&hl=%2Bwinterising+%2Bgrp

 

There is plenty more. To search put the term/s you are interested into the search box - top right

Then click on the grey google and select Forums

Click the magnifying glass

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We keep a large tube heater in the engine bay of our raw water cooled yoghurt pot over the winter. We keep it on 24/7.

 

Has worked fine for us for the last 8 years.

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By 'Caversham' I'm assuming that the OP is in T&K marina as there are no other moorings on that side of the river - if so some of my comments may not be apposite, there's very little water flow in that particular body of water. OTOH it's a very large body of water and unlikely to freeze..

Anyway,

another member of the TMBA, some years ago when winters were a bit colder, put a data logger in his cruiser and the results were that the temperature inside his engine bay never fell below 4 degrees C - even though the outside temperature did go below freezing. He was in a small marina - but there was some fresh water flow to keep the temperature up.

My boat has been moored in the stream for over ten years now and I no longer do a major drain down at the 'end of the season' but I do:-

switch off the water pump,

open a couple of taps,

empty the loo bowls,

ensure that the engine and -splutter systems have antifreeze in them.

I used to empty 'sea water' cooling system as well - but no more.

 

Think on't

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We have a weather station that has a remote sensor which we put in the engine bay. It records the temperatures over a 7 day period. With the heaters in we have not seen it drop below 5 degrees C in there and that was in the depths of winter. The cabin doesn't drop below 10 degrees C.

 

With the diesel heater running, the waste heat generated raises the engine bay temperature to about 25 degrees C!

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