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Chimney Stains down the paintwork


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This morning I went out to bring on the rain by doing a bit of brass polishing. To my horror I had chimney tar down the cabin side. I happened to have whit spirit in my hand (not to clean the brass) but that did no good.

 

Hah! I thought. The Lakeland Stove Glass Cleaner that everyone here seemed to think was a waste of money (or am I being too sensitive?). It worked a treat. Left not a trace of brown goo on the paint.

 

Note to self: Do not leave the witch's hat on when the log burner is to be lit. Condensation drips off the edges. I have a chimney liner which works ekdum atcha. I just need to put the WH on when it rains.

 

Just thought that you would love to know...

 

N

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How about trimming the hat down a little so the goo goes back down chimney. The liner helps a lot but needs cleaning regular.

 

That would defeat the purpose of the hat, which is to keep rain out of the chimley.

 

N

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That would defeat the purpose of the hat, which is to keep rain out of the chimley.

 

N

Yes understand that but thinking the trim would be very small leaving little area for rain to enter. Personally have not used hat for many years when fire alight with no bad effects.
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This morning I went out to bring on the rain by doing a bit of brass polishing. To my horror I had chimney tar down the cabin side. I happened to have whit spirit in my hand (not to clean the brass) but that did no good.

 

Hah! I thought. The Lakeland Stove Glass Cleaner that everyone here seemed to think was a waste of money (or am I being too sensitive?). It worked a treat. Left not a trace of brown goo on the paint.

 

Note to self: Do not leave the witch's hat on when the log burner is to be lit. Condensation drips off the edges. I have a chimney liner which works ekdum atcha. I just need to put the WH on when it rains.

 

Just thought that you would love to know...

 

N

Ahoy Nick. If you have the usual sort of daft chimney that overlaps the collar flange I'd chuck it just lightly silicon a bit of pipe INSIDE the collar orifice. Also make sure all your fuel is perfectly dry before using it. Bagged smokeless coal or whatever is often soaking wet when its bagged, it's normally stored in open staithes at the coal merchants, open to the weather. Putting it wet or even damp onto the fire will create creosote and more tar. A pic of my stove chimney and roof[attachment=1392:007.JPG]post-13905-0-86045400-1444997973_thumb.jpg and the stoves alight.

To ensure dry fuel, a quantity put in an old baking tin and dried on the lower shelf of your oven along with your din din above it.

Or of course, there's usually room in the roasting tin to tuck a few knobs of coal around your Sunday joint.

post-13905-0-80046900-1444997914_thumb.jpg

Edited by bizzard
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Ahoy Nick. If you have the usual sort of daft chimney that overlaps the collar flange I'd chuck it just lightly silicon a bit of pipe INSIDE the collar orifice. Also make sure all your fuel is perfectly dry before using it. Bagged smokeless coal or whatever is often soaking wet when its bagged, it's normally stored in open staithes at the coal merchants, open to the weather. Putting it wet or even damp onto the fire will create creosote and more tar. A pic of my stove chimney and roofattachicon.gif007.JPGattachicon.gif009.JPG and the stoves alight.

You should clear all that grass out of the top of your chimney though.

  • Greenie 1
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I have a relatively short chimney with a coolie hat and I've never had this issue. I only burn smokeless fuel or wood, and sweep my chimney once a year removing only dry light coloured soot. Am I just lucky with my stove and installation, is it purely a problem for those burning unseasoned wood and/or coal, or is it something else?

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Yes understand that but thinking the trim would be very small leaving little area for rain to enter. Personally have not used hat for many years when fire alight with no bad effects.

A small trim would leave only a small area for rain to fall 'directly' in, but where will the rain go that falls onto the hat go......................

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I have a relatively short chimney with a coolie hat and I've never had this issue. I only burn smokeless fuel or wood, and sweep my chimney once a year removing only dry light coloured soot. Am I just lucky with my stove and installation, is it purely a problem for those burning unseasoned wood and/or coal, or is it something else?

I'd say you burn your stove bright and hot most of the time. Over fueled and shut right down and ticking over causes most of the unburnt fuel exhaust (soot, tar) in the flue and chimney, and much more so if the fuel is wet or damp.

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Yes understand that but thinking the trim would be very small leaving little area for rain to enter. Personally have not used hat for many years when fire alight with no bad effects.

I too have never used s coolie hat and have never had any issues with rain (double skin 24" chimney)

Phil

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I'd say you burn your stove bright and hot most of the time. Over fueled and shut right down and ticking over causes most of the unburnt fuel exhaust (soot, tar) in the flue and chimney, and much more so if the fuel is wet or damp.

Well, I do give it a good burst of that daily when it's "in" Bizzard, you're right, but when it is "in" I keep it "in" for several weeks at a time so it's ticking over overnight and a probably most of the day. My ready use fuel is always dry too, I'll grant. Are we sure this free flowing tar phenomenon is not caused in the main by burning dead badgers, recently liberated beaver dams and cow pats?

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I too have never used s coolie hat and have never had any issues with rain (double skin 24" chimney)

Phil

This is my approach too. Coolie hats get condensed flue gases on them that drip onto the roof. Doing without one eliminates this.

 

A good insulated twin walled chimney fitted properly on the roof flange doesn't leak condensate either and your roof stays clean.

 

I have seen a hat designed to stop the drips falling onto the roof, however. It had an inverted cone on its underside, with the point over the centre of the chimney. Condensate thus, in theory, ran down the cone, dripping off the point back down the flue.

 

I'm not sure if it worked and have never found a supplier of one to try. I thought about making my own but have never bothered as we do well enough hatless!

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A small trim would leave only a small area for rain to fall 'directly' in, but where will the rain go that falls onto the hat go......................

It would be in the design of the finished cut. Turn edge up leaving one very small section overhanging rain will drain off here.

A lot of mucking about so just leave the hat off when fire lit.

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It would be in the design of the finished cut. Turn edge up leaving one very small section overhanging rain will drain off here.

A lot of mucking about so just leave the hat off when fire lit.

 

Leaving it on was something of an oversight. My main purpose of posting was to let people know about the properties of the Lakeland product.

 

I will do my best to avoid burning beaver dams in future but the little furry friends use rather a nice size of wood, easily cut into the correct lengths.

 

N

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