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Follow the Waterway Code, urges Canal & River Trust


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PRESS RELEASE

 

2nd July 2021

 

FOLLOW THE WATERWAY CODE, URGES CANAL & RIVER TRUST

 

The Canal & River Trust has worked with boaters and anglers to update and relaunch the Waterway Code to help all those who share the water understand and be considerate of each other’s needs.

 

Many people discovered the joys of the waterways during lockdown and this summer, with overseas travel still largely restricted, private leisure boating, hire boat holidays, paddle sports and angling are expected to be more popular than ever. This is a timely reminder to share the space considerately.

 

Boaters, anglers and paddle sports enthusiasts are likely be familiar with much of the advice which offers common sense guidance and is an updated version of a previously published Code.

 

Jon Horsfall, head of customer service support at Canal & River Trust, said: “As boaters, anglers, and paddlers get back out on the water this summer, making the most of their licences, we are encouraging people to read and follow the Waterway Code and celebrate good manners and considerate behaviour. Being on or by the water makes people healthier and happier and we want to make sure everyone can enjoy the time they spend with us by following these simple pointers.”

 

The Waterway Code is a companion to the Towpath Code, which covers towpaths and cycling.  The aim of both advisory codes is to make the waterways pleasant and safe places for everyone who uses them.

 

The Waterway Code can be found here: https://canalrivertrust.org.uk/media/original/44024-waterway-code-for-boaters-anglers-and-unpowered-craft.pdf

 

ENDS

 

For further information, please contact:

Fran Read, national press officer

e fran.read@canalrivertrust.org.uk  m 07796 610 427

 

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The use of the term paddle sport is of interest, may be the CRT should consider a revision in their notice?

 

These them are paddlers, and them that goo paddling as Ernie Thomas might have said, if he was alive.

 

In recent times I have encountered paddle boards, canoes and rowing on the Severn near Diglis. I did think the paddle boarders looked a bit unsafe as the rowers sped past them. Up at Shrewsbury the paddle boarders seen a bit more secure on that section. Yet paddle boarding needs relatively still waters as are found on canals, I would think. Paddeboarding on rivers has the problem of current and how to paddle safely,

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1 hour ago, Heartland said:

Yet paddle boarding needs relatively still waters as are found on canals, I would think. Paddeboarding on rivers has the problem of current and how to paddle safely,

It’s actually OK on rivers. I’ve just PB’d from Henley to Wargrave and back with my 8 year old, towing him most of the return journey into a head wind. Bloody knackered tho! 

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43 minutes ago, Thames Bhaji said:

It’s actually OK on rivers. I’ve just PB’d from Henley to Wargrave and back with my 8 year old, towing him most of the return journey into a head wind. Bloody knackered tho! 

They do it on the Broads.

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On 06/07/2021 at 15:28, Heartland said:

Yet paddle boarding needs relatively still waters as are found on canals, I would think.

 

Not according to the plenty who were paddle boarding around the mouth of the Teign yesterday as the tide came swiftly in.

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