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Welsherfarr

Working on the bottom of the hull.

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Hi all,

What is the best way to work on the bottom of the hull of a boat? Can you roll a boat on its side? 

 

Tips please. I need to replace the fins on my dawncraft 25 

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1 minute ago, Welsherfarr said:

Hi all,

What is the best way to work on the bottom of the hull of a boat? Can you roll a boat on its side? 

 

Tips please. I need to replace the fins on my dawncraft 25 

1 Aqualung or

2 Lift out to hard standing at a boatyard

 

Howard

  • Haha 1

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Best not to roll a boat onto its side. All the oil will fall out of the engine and diesel from the fuel tank for a start. And all your glassware will smash.

 

Normal practice is to lie on your back in the mud to work on the underneath. Or better, pay someone else to do it. 

 

 

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43 minutes ago, Welsherfarr said:

Hi all,

What is the best way to work on the bottom of the hull of a boat? Can you roll a boat on its side? 

 

Tips please. I need to replace the fins on my dawncraft 25 

Yes, if you empty the boat you can roll it on it's side.

 

I'm assuming you want to fibreglass the keelbars back in because the original ones have rotted, so it's worth paying the extra money for decent hardwood ... don't waste your time trying to glass in cheap pine. 

 

The timber will cost £10s the epoxy will cost £100s, and the labour is only free if you don't value your own time.

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1 hour ago, TheBiscuits said:

Yes, if you empty the boat you can roll it on it's side.

 

I'm assuming you want to fibreglass the keelbars back in because the original ones have rotted, so it's worth paying the extra money for decent hardwood ... don't waste your time trying to glass in cheap pine. 

 

The timber will cost £10s the epoxy will cost £100s, and the labour is only free if you don't value your own time.

Correct on all counts. 

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On 19/01/2020 at 22:31, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

Normal practice is to lie on your back in the mud to work on the underneath. 

That's how I did it . Just applied the blue antifoul coat at the weekend.

20200124.jpg

 

 

Edited by MartynG
.

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We had ours twin-pack epoxy anti-fouled in October.

Do what you can then move the supports and do the 'uncoated spots'

 

In your case place the supports where you can get to work on the fins.

 

16-10-19j.jpg

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9 minutes ago, tree monkey said:

Are supports like that normal?

To my untutored eye they look a bit optimistic 

:)

All the weight is taken in the base of the hull.

The struts at the sides just stop the boat from tipping over.

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26 minutes ago, MartynG said:

All the weight is taken in the base of the hull.

The struts at the sides just stop the boat from tipping over.

I sort of see that but it was the tipping over I was thinking about, it just doesn't look very robust 

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10 minutes ago, tree monkey said:

I sort of see that but it was the tipping over I was thinking about, it just doesn't look very robust 

Every time I go to a lumpy water boatyard and see how the boats are propped up I wince....beer barrels & dodgy props look to be the norm...I know the boats are fibreglass but I still think the boat would win if it fell on you!!

  • Greenie 1

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19 minutes ago, tree monkey said:

I sort of see that but it was the tipping over I was thinking about, it just doesn't look very robust 

You wouldn't believe how hard they are 'hammered in' (using a 28lb hammer). No it doesn't crack the fibreglass - fibreglass is tough stuff.

My hull is 1" thick (2"+ around the keel) and weighs 10 tonnes exactly - probably heavier than a 36 foot NB with ballast.

 

I have never yet seen one fall over - I guess the marinas don't want to get a reputation or an insurance history of letting boats fall over.

  • Greenie 1

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1 hour ago, frangar said:

Every time I go to a lumpy water boatyard and see how the boats are propped up I wince....beer barrels & dodgy props look to be the norm...I know the boats are fibreglass but I still think the boat would win if it fell on you!!

Its very similar when on the truck - it does look awfully top-heavy.

 

 

 

21-10-19t.jpg

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2 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

Its very similar when on the truck - it does look awfully top-heavy.

 

 

 

21-10-19t.jpg

At least there looks to be some engineering involved there :)

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It's not unknown for boats to fall over.

However a rare event and not something I have witnessed locally. 

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These didn't fall over, but the fire had a domino effect on neighbouring boats tightly packed into our local yard a few years back.

FR.jpg

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