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24v system, new batteries.


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18 hours ago, WotEver said:

Nowt much to say, Mike? ;)

 

We had a poet outage just as I was posting so not sure why the header got through but not the content. I then re posted at some length but it appears also to gave vanished into thin ether. I will try again when energy permits!

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18 minutes ago, Mike Todd said:

but it appears also to gave vanished into thin ether.

There is "Thin Air" but I wasn't aware that ether came in various thicknesses (unless you include Di-Ether)

 

Several ninhydrin-positive lipids were found in methanogenic bacteria and the structure of one of them, designated as PNL2 from Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus, was identified as a diphytanyl ether analog of phosphatidylserine. The chromatographic behavior of the lipid on thin-layer plates and on a DEAE-cellulose column was identical to the ester form of phosphatidylserine. The infrared spectra showed the presence of amino, carboxyl, ether, and phosphate groups, and the absence of an ester linkage. The hydrophobic portion of the lipid was identified as diphytanyl glycerol diether on the basis of the mass spectrum of the acetolysis product and gas-liquid chromatography of the iodinated alkyl chain prepared by hydroiodic acid cleavage of PNL2. The fast atom bombardment-ionization and field desorption mass spectrum provided a molecular weight of 819 and several fragment ions consistent with the proposed structure. Hydrofluoric acid hydrolysis resulted in water-soluble products including serine, phosphoserine, and ammonia, which accounted for 95% of hydrolyzed PNL2. The lipid product of the hydrolysis was mainly the diether form of phosphatidic acid. This is the first report on the structural characterization of an amino-containing phospholipid in archaebacteria. Amino lipids have been found in many other methanogenic bacteria.

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13 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

There is "Thin Air" but I wasn't aware that ether came in various thicknesses (unless you include Di-Ether)

 

Several ninhydrin-positive lipids were found in methanogenic bacteria and the structure of one of them, designated as PNL2 from Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus, was identified as a diphytanyl ether analog of phosphatidylserine. The chromatographic behavior of the lipid on thin-layer plates and on a DEAE-cellulose column was identical to the ester form of phosphatidylserine. The infrared spectra showed the presence of amino, carboxyl, ether, and phosphate groups, and the absence of an ester linkage. The hydrophobic portion of the lipid was identified as diphytanyl glycerol diether on the basis of the mass spectrum of the acetolysis product and gas-liquid chromatography of the iodinated alkyl chain prepared by hydroiodic acid cleavage of PNL2. The fast atom bombardment-ionization and field desorption mass spectrum provided a molecular weight of 819 and several fragment ions consistent with the proposed structure. Hydrofluoric acid hydrolysis resulted in water-soluble products including serine, phosphoserine, and ammonia, which accounted for 95% of hydrolyzed PNL2. The lipid product of the hydrolysis was mainly the diether form of phosphatidic acid. This is the first report on the structural characterization of an amino-containing phospholipid in archaebacteria. Amino lipids have been found in many other methanogenic bacteria.

Surprisingly I don’t feel wiser having read (to be honest I got confused) this.

Edited by Chewbacka
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On 11/08/2019 at 18:39, Mark 0810 said:

I think so, just by the fact the monitor never shows 100% and will drop to below 80% even if I'm out for the day and only 24v fridge & freezer are on and TV on standby?

On a typical boat the fridge alone may account for around half your total electricity use. Add a freezer in and it will be higher. So it is not surprising that running both all day will take a substantial chunk of your total battery capacity.

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15 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

There is "Thin Air" but I wasn't aware that ether came in various thicknesses (unless you include Di-Ether)

 

Several ninhydrin-positive lipids were found in methanogenic bacteria and the structure of one of them, designated as PNL2 from Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus, was identified as a diphytanyl ether analog of phosphatidylserine. The chromatographic behavior of the lipid on thin-layer plates and on a DEAE-cellulose column was identical to the ester form of phosphatidylserine. The infrared spectra showed the presence of amino, carboxyl, ether, and phosphate groups, and the absence of an ester linkage. The hydrophobic portion of the lipid was identified as diphytanyl glycerol diether on the basis of the mass spectrum of the acetolysis product and gas-liquid chromatography of the iodinated alkyl chain prepared by hydroiodic acid cleavage of PNL2. The fast atom bombardment-ionization and field desorption mass spectrum provided a molecular weight of 819 and several fragment ions consistent with the proposed structure. Hydrofluoric acid hydrolysis resulted in water-soluble products including serine, phosphoserine, and ammonia, which accounted for 95% of hydrolyzed PNL2. The lipid product of the hydrolysis was mainly the diether form of phosphatidic acid. This is the first report on the structural characterization of an amino-containing phospholipid in archaebacteria. Amino lipids have been found in many other methanogenic bacteria.

Trouble us I am old enough to think that Ethernet is new fangled technology.  . .

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