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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/12/11 in all areas

  1. I,and i'm sure most of us love peace and quiet. BUT.I have taken to trying to moor day or night away from other boats,mainly modernish ones with all the trappings of so called modern living, requiring huge comsumption of electrical power. There used to be an agreed time to run engines for charging purposes,i think between 7 and 8pm correct me if i'm wrong,but very few boaters seem to adhere to this old rule anymore. Indeed in days of yore,anyone moored on a trot of boats, needing to charge batteries out of these times would ask the neighboring boaters if they minded the noise for a short time ''never at night though''and would almost always receive a polite and pleasant,yes of course. But i'm afraid in general these days, most either just don't know the old courtesy rules or just selfishly choose to ignore them.-S------them,i pay my dues,i'm going to do as i please attitude,i know a couple of owners who have this attitude. Also a lot of the freindliness has gone.Most seem to now,pull in, tie up,go and shut themselves in and i presume set all their inverter powered electrical appliances running.Its no wonder Electrolosis is such a major issue these days,no offense whatever,meant to anyone,by the way. We'll all have to change to wooden boats as a remedy. Why on a couple of occasions i've traveled for half a day sharing locks ect,tied up behind them for the night,sat down with a cup of tea swooning in the peace,and lo within about 10 mins that boats started its engine again after running all day!,and i and others are now subject to a droning engine ,maybe hours. Once i was moored at i think Apsley GU opposite the new Papermakers pub (London Pride} mmmmm. behind an maximum size wide beam.Apart from its wretched Eber come Weba going on and off like a vacuum cleaner all night long (mid summer). An on demand diesel generator i presume in its engine room roared out at 2am for around 15 mins,horrendous.I'm told this occurs a lot. .All those thinking of going all electric,''please'' Hope i've not offended anyone. Kind regards to all. bizzard.
    2 points
  2. No, George was a former Wigan Coal & Iron Company wide boat, seen below at Astley Green in 1971.
    1 point
  3. I can't see what all of the fuss is about. Historically, boat/ship names are changed all of the time. Most Merchant Vessels have had several name changes. Usually whenever the ship gets a new owner, the first thing they do is change the name. It's Kez's boat, call it whatever you want.
    1 point
  4. ...unless there's no lock on the door.
    1 point
  5. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  6. Firstly, the canal is the Leeds and Liverpool, not the Leeds Liverpool. Please use the correct terminology in future posts. Sailing boats certainly did use the L&LC up till the 1840s, when the Stanley Dock branch was built. Coal for ships in Liverpool Docks was taken onto the Bridgewater Canal, then down Runcorn Locks, and then sailed down to Liverpool, ensuring that it only needed to be transhipped once, directly into waiting ships. In Yorkshire, goods were advertised as being delivered to Hull 'in one bottom', meaning that transhipment did not take place, and again sailing boats must have been used. However, they would have had folding or removable masts. I suspect that the masts were removed at Runcorn or Goole/Knottingley/Leeds respectively. There was a boat yard at Burscough, on the off side of the canal between Top Locks and Glovers Bridge. The yard was run by the Tyrer family, and I do wonder if they were part of Tyrer and Glovers, who were one of the two large general cargo carriers prior to 1848, when they were taken over by the canal company following railway competition. On the 1802 plans of the canal, no boat yard is shown here, but there was the drydock at Top Locks, where boats may have been built. Coastal sailing vessels from West Lancashire were usually built in the Tarleton area, and there were several yards below the present lock. If the Diamond was built at Burscough, it would have had to be small enough for the Rufford Branch locks, quite possible with a registered tonnage of 25T. Masts would then have been put in at Tarleton. As a two masted schooner, it would probably have been better known as a jigger flat, the jigger being the smaller mast at the stern. Back entries in Liverpool were once known as jiggers, with cats called jigger rabbits. One other possibility is that the Diamond was owned by a group of Burscough area residents, as there is a long history of sailing boat ownership in the area.
    1 point
  7. Why do I think you are purposely being controversial, first batteries and now this. Maybe one for the ignore list.
    1 point
  8. If you can't have a bath in half a mug of cold tea topped up with spit then you're not a proper boater. Regards, HughC.
    1 point
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