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Another excellent time to use this look is as you climb out of the canal having exited the boat on the "wet side" - happened to me once many years ago - I've got no idea why I walked off the wrong side, stone cold sober and full daylight :banghead:

 

The most extreme version of this I've heard was at Dadford's. According to the story, Ian Kemp was single-handing the 21, when apparently Comet decided to leave a lock considerably faster than at tick-over, escaped even his clutches and hammered off into the distance heading for a brick wall on the wet side. To Kempy's amazement though she gracefully followed the channel and neatly slid onto the next lock which just happened to be opened. Apparently, the fisherman on the towpath said "takes a lifetime to learn them skills, son". Apparently beer was required to get over the shock. Ian does nonchalance exceptionally well. How true the story is, I don't know.

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Only time I remember my boat going backwards with no trouble was last year on the Shroppie. It was tanking down and a strong wind blowing. Although I was wearing wet gear I stopped in an bridge hole to change my jacketg which was leaking. As the boat moved slightly forward I put it in reverse to keep under the bridge. When I tried to take it out of gear the cable snapped leaving me in reverse. I was'nt too worried as the nearest boat was moored 500yards away and I thought we would head for the bank as usual. No such luck.

Straight as a dye back down the middle of the cut. No matter what I did she wouldn't move off course. Frantic pulling up of the floorboards before the light dawned and I switched off the engine and let if drift into the bank.

 

If you ever discover the secret for reversing in a straight line - every time - keep it to yourself you'll have many a happy hour watching the rest of us mess it up.

 

 

 

Good luck

 

 

 

John Hinch

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There's a very fine line between being able to bluster through and having no chance whatsoever. Maybe judging that dividing line is the greatest skill of all? Bravado is great when it works! Love the story about Comet, you've got to hope that's true.

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The obvious hasn't been mentioned yet.... that occasional bursts of forward gear allow you to use the tiller to set the stern in line with where you want it to go astern.

 

But I agree with posts #18 and #24. There is no shame whatsoever in using ropes to warp her in in windy conditions.

 

Tone

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How's this. Just an idea I've never done it nor seen it done.

Leave a rope tied to each end of the berth lying on the jetty, get the stern close enough to the "wrong" end to loop a rope through the one on the jetty and secure it to the boat. Now the stern will follow that rope. Reverse back until you can do the same with the centre rope then continue to reverse until it's time to stop.

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How's this. Just an idea I've never done it nor seen it done.

Leave a rope tied to each end of the berth lying on the jetty, get the stern close enough to the "wrong" end to loop a rope through the one on the jetty and secure it to the boat. Now the stern will follow that rope. Reverse back until you can do the same with the centre rope then continue to reverse until it's time to stop.

 

It's an idea, but if you're that close to the jetty, why not just step ashore, centreline in hand, and warp her in?

 

Tone

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Do you not have anyone who could pull you in from the end of the mooring , presumably if your boat is 40 ft then the boats either side may be longer and will be further out into the basin. if you pulled alongsidein front of these boats then someone may be able to pull you in and you can swivel the boat around., obviosly keepingaway from their front ends

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get a cruiser.... easy peasy!

 

I have heard of 2 aids to reversing a sewer tube, one has been mentioned - drag a mud weight from the bow, keeps bow from swinging, the other is to give it a burst of for'ard with the rudder pointing in the appropriate direction, not enough to slow down much but enough to align the boat, then back into reverse again.

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other is to give it a burst of for'ard with the rudder pointing in the appropriate direction, not enough to slow down much but enough to align the boat, then back into reverse again.

 

Which generally works very well when it isn't as windy as it has been which is where the OP came in.

 

Very strong winds will often override whatever you try to do going in reverse as you can't get up enough speed to counter it.

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Which generally works very well when it isn't as windy as it has been which is where the OP came in.

 

Very strong winds will often override whatever you try to do going in reverse as you can't get up enough speed to counter it.

 

fair enough - not tried it -no need in a cruiser with outboard, but thought it worth throwing in the pot for consideration.

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Thanks everyone. Will keep everything crossed as I hope to `venture out` this weekend. Will take `on board` all of your advice. Using the ropes I think will be the key. They do say it`s a contact sport don`t they. One way to introduce myself to the neighbours I suppose.

 

Sue

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These tales of making mistakes whilst still trying to look nonchalant and as if they were intended, reminds me of the WW2 destroyer that steamed into the harbour at Gibralter flat out, hit the stone wharf, reversed into the side of an aircraft carrier, bounced off and crunched a destroyer, where it came to rest. The Admiral of the fleet was watching this unfold and signaled the captain of the destroyer 'What are you going to do next?'. As quick as a flash the reply came back, 'Buy a farm!'

Gordon

Edited by Gordon Chesterman
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Sorry Sue, but 'They' tend to be people who can't handle a boat. Not a good example to follow IMHO.

 

I'm afraid I agree Sue.

 

Accidental or unavoidable contact is one thing, especially when it's another boat we should strive to avoid it if at all possible.

 

I get a tad narked when Jan says this to other boaters when they hit us even though I know she is saying it to make them feel better, I don't think it helps TBH.

Edited by MJG
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I obviously have given the impression of whatever happens - happens! This is not the case. I will endeavour to avoid ANY sort of contact and merely wanted advice.

 

Sue

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I'm afraid I agree Sue.

 

Accidental or unavoidable contact is one thing, especially when it's another boat we should strive to avoid it if at all possible.

 

I get a tad narked when Jan says this to other boaters when they hit us even though I know she is saying it to make them feel better, I don't think it helps TBH.

And this from the man who had several attempts at coming in sideways last week. Tsk.

 

The expression "It's a contact sport" relates to the fact that narrowboats are robust and can cope with those occasions when things don't quite go according to plan. It's a comment on the inevitability of contact every once in a while.

 

It is NOT an encouragement to hit things deliberately and IMHO only berks read it this way.

 

Aiming to hit people is bad, agreed. But aiming to be perfect in an imperfect world isn't always practicable either. Just do the best you can, and if you do hit something, hit it slowly and say 'sorry' afterwards. To the owners, if necessary, but most of all to the boat. They have feelings you know.

Edited by sociable_hermit
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And this from the man who had several attempts at coming in sideways last week. Tsk.

 

 

Well I wasn't at the boat last week.

 

I also refered to this further up the thread.

 

But if you are referring to three weeks ago - indeed it was a lesson well learnt it was terriibly windy which if you were watching you will have noticed. You will also have noticed I gave up the reason? precisely because it isn't a contact sport.

 

The term is generally used in the context of it doesn't matter if you hit something therefore no need to take care this being my reason for my post.

Edited by MJG
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