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Gerry underwood

How much paint.

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How much undercoat/ paint would I roughly need for a 59x13 steel widebeam.  Not going for perfection but a nice finish. The roof will be being done.

Edited by Gerry underwood
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42 minutes ago, Gerry underwood said:

How much undercoat/ paint would I roughly need for a 59x13 steel widebeam.  Not going for perfection but a nice finish. The roof will be being done.

My boat is a 14' widebeam

 

It will depend on what type of paint you choose.

Look at the tin (data sheet) and it will tell you how many square metres per litre.

Say your boat roof is 20 metres x 4 metres that's 80 sq metres per coat.

 

Example :

2 costs of primer = 160 square metres

2 coats of undercoat = 160 square metres

3 coats of top coat = 240 square metres

 

The paint I've been using is 16.5 sq mts per 2.5 litre can

 

So in the above example I'd need 

25 litres of primer

25 litres of undercoat

36 litres of top-coat.

 

You will then need £200 (ish) spending on rollers, brushes, masking tape, gloves etc etc.

 

Edited by Alan de Enfield

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31 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

Look at the tin (data sheet) and it will tell you how many square metres per litre.

Say your boat roof is 20 metres x 4 metres that's 80 sq metres per coat.

 

Example :

2 costs of primer = 160 square metres

2 coats of undercoat = 160 square metres

3 coats of top coat = 240 square metres

 

The paint I've been using is 16.5 sq mts per 2.5 litre can

 

So in the above example I'd need 

25 litres of primer

25 litres of undercoat

36 litres of top-coat.

 

 

Be careful using metric units on this forum !   ?

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16.5 sq m per 2.5ltr tin doesn't sound very much, I would have thought 16.5 sq m per 1 ltr would be more like it. A tin of Dulux Satinwood here on the side at home says 17sq m per Ltr.

So primer to cover 160 sq m would be 10 rather than 25

Edited by sharpness
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9 minutes ago, sharpness said:

16.5 sq m per 2.5ltr tin doesn't sound very much, I would have thought 16.5 sq m per 1 ltr would be more like it. A tin of Dulux Satinwood here on the side at home says 17sq m per Ltr.

So primer to cover 160 sq m would be 10 rather than 25

My primer was 16.5 sq metres per 2.5 litre can. (2.5 litre can was £65 per 2.5 litres)

My top-coat (Poly Gloss) is 12 sq metres per can (2.5 litre can was £30 per 2.5 litres)

 

From the Hemple data sheet for the primer :

 

Shade nos/Colours: 13700*/ Grey. (see REMARKS overleaf)
Finish: High-gloss
Volume solids, %: 100
Theoretical spreading rate: 6.6 m2/l [264.7 sq.ft./US gallon] - 150 micron/6 mils

 

 

But the numbers were just examples & the OP could substitute the information from the can for whatever he decided to use.

  • Greenie 1

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4 hours ago, MartynG said:

Be careful using metric units on this forum !   ?

Too bloody right.!

 

Measure the boat in chains and cubits like the rest of us !!…..?

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A lot will depend on whether you're actually painting the whole boat from bare metal. If the existing paint is basically sound and you're just giving it a key and patch priming/undercoating small areas of rust that you've prepped, then the existing sound keyed paint is your primer and possibly undercoat too.

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5 hours ago, blackrose said:

A lot will depend on whether you're actually painting the whole boat from bare metal. If the existing paint is basically sound and you're just giving it a key and patch priming/undercoating small areas of rust that you've prepped, then the existing sound keyed paint is your primer and possibly undercoat too.

That is the plan. We are going from Green to Black.

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Tones of the same colour are always easy on the eye. Dark green, light green, dark blue, light blue, Dark grey, light grey for example, avoid reds altogether.

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2 hours ago, bizzard said:

Tones of the same colour are always easy on the eye. Dark green, light green, dark blue, light blue, Dark grey, light grey for example, avoid reds altogether.

Tonnes?

Black ................. everywhere?

 

 

 

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