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Jan13

VHF on the Trent : Lock MMSI numbers?

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Just completed the VHF course and looking forward to getting used to the radio instead of the mobile to contact lock keepers on the Trent.

I wondered whether anyone knows where to get MMSI numbers for individual locks rather than having to call them up on Ch74. Can't find any on the MARS website.

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45 minutes ago, Jan13 said:

Just completed the VHF course and looking forward to getting used to the radio instead of the mobile to contact lock keepers on the Trent.

I wondered whether anyone knows where to get MMSI numbers for individual locks rather than having to call them up on Ch74. Can't find any on the MARS website.

As far as I know they only use the non-DSC radios (no MMSI)

 

Channel 74 is the way to call them

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I don’t believe that DSC is used anywhere on the inland waterways.  So that is 80% of the course content that you will not use ?

 

In all the CRT cases like Trent, Severn, Ouse you just call up the lock on channel 74.

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On 21/01/2019 at 21:50, john6767 said:

I don’t believe that DSC is used anywhere on the inland waterways.  So that is 80% of the course content that you will not use ?

 

 

WAAAAAHHH!!!?

That was most of the day!!! ?

Although I did find it to be a faff and thought that just calling up on the handset was a lot more direct!

 

Thanks for the feedback though! ?

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11 hours ago, Jan13 said:

WAAAAAHHH!!!?

That was most of the day!!! ?

Although I did find it to be a faff and thought that just calling up on the handset was a lot more direct!

 

Thanks for the feedback though! ?

Yep. Most of the days course is ill elephant to inland boaters. Useful skill and piece of paper to have though and it is nice to have Trent locks set for you when you arrive.

 

Jen

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4 hours ago, Jen-in-Wellies said:

Yep. Most of the days course is ill elephant to inland boaters. Useful skill and piece of paper to have though and it is nice to have Trent locks set for you when you arrive.

 

Jen

Assuming the lockie is listening of course. :rolleyes:

  • Happy 1

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I think there are a number of Coastguard stations who say they don't monitor Ch 16 all the time, so DSC is more useful in those circumstances...  I've not  upgraded to DSC yet, I think I am more interested (if I need more gadgets) in AIS.

 

As well as being old fashioned, the other main reason for using the "just call them up" broadcast approach is that it's really useful to hear what other boats are saying. For example on the Thames you can use this to get rather more warning of something like this coming up behind you.  If the skipper used DSC to report in to London VTS then you would be none the wiser.

 

dsc_6513.jpg

Edited by Scholar Gypsy

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26 minutes ago, Scholar Gypsy said:

I think there are a number of Coastguard stations who say they don't monitor Ch 16 all the time,

The number that have a dedicated 'headset' watch is 'Zero'.

It is simply now a loudspeaker 'on the wall' and relies on someone on watch hearing the call.

 

A VHF radio will enable you to summon help by calling the Coastguard and alerting other vessels. Up until recently this was done with a mayday call on Ch16. However, the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) has changed. There is no longer a legal requirement for any ship or coast station to maintain a manual watch on Ch16. The UK Coastguard and Irish Coast Guard have ceased a dedicated Ch16 headset watch and now monitor this via a wall-mounted loudspeaker. Please check with other countries if going abroad.

Instead, commercial ships and the Coastguard now monitor a special digital channel with DSC radios. To transmit a distress message on this channel you will need a DSC radio.

 

http://completeguide.rnli.org/vhf-radios.html

Edited by Alan de Enfield

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18 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

The number that have a dedicated 'headset' watch is 'Zero'.

It is simply now a loudspeaker 'on the wall' and relies on someone on watch hearing the call.

 

A VHF radio will enable you to summon help by calling the Coastguard and alerting other vessels. Up until recently this was done with a mayday call on Ch16. However, the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) has changed. There is no longer a legal requirement for any ship or coast station to maintain a manual watch on Ch16. The UK Coastguard and Irish Coast Guard have ceased a dedicated Ch16 headset watch and now monitor this via a wall-mounted loudspeaker. Please check with other countries if going abroad.

Instead, commercial ships and the Coastguard now monitor a special digital channel with DSC radios. To transmit a distress message on this channel you will need a DSC radio.

 

http://completeguide.rnli.org/vhf-radios.html

 Thank you,, I had misunderstood    

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So DSC still is useful for those emergency situations in coastal areas. Presumably including the lower Humber- (which I havent ventured onto yet but is my ambition!).

I do like Scholar Gypsy's point about listening to other boats as well.

 

Time will tell whether the lockies respond more to the radio than the phone though! ?

 

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12 minutes ago, Jan13 said:

Time will tell whether the lockies respond more to the radio than the phone though! ?

The only time I have never had a response via VHF has been outside of manning hours.

 

It has occasionally taken several calls if they are 'cutting the grass, painting or whatever' but as I normally call up and give a 20 minute notice, it gives plenty of chance/ time for several calls and still have the gates open ready for your arrival.

 

Had a lovely, but cold. run upstream on the Trent today.

About 2.5* C and feet like Ice-cubes but mugs of tea kept the upper-half comfortably warm

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9 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

The only time I have never had a response via VHF has been outside of manning hours.

 

It has occasionally taken several calls if they are 'cutting the grass, painting or whatever' but as I normally call up and give a 20 minute notice, it gives plenty of chance/ time for several calls and still have the gates open ready for your arrival.

 

Had a lovely, but cold. run upstream on the Trent today.

About 2.5* C and feet like Ice-cubes but mugs of tea kept the upper-half comfortably warm

Several times on our arrival back at Torksey during locking hours we have had no reply to our several calls. We have had to moor up and go and find the lockie who nine times out of ten is in the tea rooms having his sausage rolls :rolleyes:

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3 minutes ago, Naughty Cal said:

Several times on our arrival back at Torksey during locking hours we have had no reply to our several calls. We have had to moor up and go and find the lockie who nine times out of ten is in the tea rooms having his sausage rolls :rolleyes:

Must admit to only having used Torksey twice (in & out) in the last 3 years, as once thru' we are too big to go anywhere past Saxilby

Edited by Alan de Enfield

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I don't think DCS is used for calling very much at all...even at sea.

However, as  said,  the correct way to call the coastguard now is via DSC . This relies on their number being available to you and preferably  saved in the vhf radio .

 

I don't think DSC methods of calling would work on the Trent and it is not necessary as you can use a mobile phone instead.. As there are often a number of people wanting to call at the same time it is helpful that it is all heard by everyone in the vicinity. The conversations  help you to understand what is happening......... sometimes locks may be in you favour and sometimes against. It does sometimes help avoid delays .

 

 

Edited by MartynG
.

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21 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

Must admit to only having used Torksey twice (in & out) in the last 3 years, as once thru' we are too big to go anywhere past Saxilby

Yes. I remember you getting stuck at Saxilby.

 

Was somewhat surprised as there are some big heavy boats on the ditch that are fine up to Lincoln.

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1 minute ago, Naughty Cal said:

Yes. I remember you getting stuck at Saxilby.

 

Was somewhat surprised as there are some big heavy boats on the ditch that are fine up to Lincoln.

We draw 4'6" which, if C&RT were dredging to their stated figures, would not be a problem.

However, they don't and it is.

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5 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

We draw 4'6" which, if C&RT were dredging to their stated figures, would not be a problem.

However, they don't and it is.

The bigger steel dutch cruisers which are becoming popular are mostly over 4ft static draft. They don't seem to struggle.

 

They must just be ploughing through the silt.

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11 minutes ago, Naughty Cal said:

The bigger steel dutch cruisers which are becoming popular are mostly over 4ft static draft. They don't seem to struggle.

 

They must just be ploughing through the silt.

I guess I could reduce the draft a few inches if I wasn't carrying 2.5 tonnes of fuel.

 

The 'Shallow Farndon Bend' seems to be getting bigger and bigger, Yesterday I was well over to the marina entrance side of the river and still 'hit bottom'.

Edited by Alan de Enfield

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3 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

I guess I could reduce the draft a few inches if I wasn't carrying 2.5 tonnes of fuel.

 

The 'Shallow Farndon Bend' seems to be getting bigger and bigger, Yesterday I was well over to the marina entrance side of the river and still 'hit bottom'.

Not been up that way for a while. Will keep that in mind for this summer if we head up there.

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13 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

The only time I have never had a response via VHF has been outside of manning hours.

 

It has occasionally taken several calls if they are 'cutting the grass, painting or whatever' but as I normally call up and give a 20 minute notice, it gives plenty of chance/ time for several calls and still have the gates open ready for your arrival.

 

Had a lovely, but cold. run upstream on the Trent today.

About 2.5* C and feet like Ice-cubes but mugs of tea kept the upper-half comfortably warm

Ah yes - there’s a lot to be said for the winter run. Bracing to say the least! ?

3 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

I guess I could reduce the draft a few inches if I wasn't carrying 2.5 tonnes of fuel.

 

The 'Shallow Farndon Bend' seems to be getting bigger and bigger, Yesterday I was well over to the marina entrance side of the river and still 'hit bottom'.

Bloomin’ Heck! Sounds like you are piloting a small freighter!?

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Had a fantastic run to Farndon before Christmas. Very cold crisp day but sunshine (at least when we set off).

Really nice mulled wine at Knots bar before setting off back. Got to test the newly installed wipers on the way back!

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32 minutes ago, Jan13 said:

Bloomin’ Heck! Sounds like you are piloting a small freighter!

It is 14 foot beam & was built as a small offshore trawler, total conversion to a Cruising Liveaboard and the re-engining from a single engine to Twin 6.2 litre 6-cylinder Fords makes it 'safer'. - the 2900 litre fuel tanks give it a range of about 2000 miles at 6 knots.

 

It just fits thru' Torksey lock with about 6" to spare at the sides.

 

You possibly recognise Cromwell ?

CAM00008.jpg

Edited by Alan de Enfield

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9 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

The 'Shallow Farndon Bend' seems to be getting bigger and bigger, Yesterday I was well over to the marina entrance side of the river and still 'hit bottom'.

Which bend is that?

Keeping too far left (travelling upstream) when approaching the entrance to Farndon Marina may well  find rocks . (Guess how I  know)

Keep left of centre approaching the marina entrance and perhaps a little more left passing the visitor pontoon.

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