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Sign Writing and Name Change?


GreyLady
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I am a paint sprayer but those sign writers and coach painters in my book have more skill.

 

Anyhow say we have a boat and it was called something naff and we wanted to change the name what's the crack?

 

Do they sand the whole bordered box area down and start afresh or do they have a trick up their sleeve and just paint the area near the name?

 

Maybe this is a daft question.

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Not at all.

 

As a working signwriter, I've been asked this question many times and the answer, to the surprise of many is to flat back the original panel completely, getting rid of every trace of old lettering prior to repainting before re-lettering. Any old stuff remaining will doubtless show up slightly under new paint. If the existing paint job is tired, old or faded then the new panel,may well look rather prominent...only you can decide whether it's live-able with. I'm speaking, of course, of hand painted lettering. Vinyl can often be removed using heat, but the panel would still need to be cut back ( Farecla G3 paste is good stuff ) before proceeding, as vinyl is removed the shadow of its presence remains. Happy to talk you through this, PM me,...not looking for work!

 

Cheers

 

Dave

  • Greenie 1
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Only by superstitious people.

 

IMO it's only relevant if the person believed in that <claptrap> before he was told of it. So by definition if it don't worry ya, change the boat name. I would if I did not like my bote name.

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Not at all.

 

As a working signwriter, I've been asked this question many times and the answer, to the surprise of many is to flat back the original panel completely, getting rid of every trace of old lettering prior to repainting before re-lettering. Any old stuff remaining will doubtless show up slightly under new paint. If the existing paint job is tired, old or faded then the new panel,may well look rather prominent...only you can decide whether it's live-able with. I'm speaking, of course, of hand painted lettering. Vinyl can often be removed using heat, but the panel would still need to be cut back ( Farecla G3 paste is good stuff ) before proceeding, as vinyl is removed the shadow of its presence remains. Happy to talk you through this, PM me,...not looking for work!

 

Cheers

 

Dave

Hia Dave,

 

I feel quite honoured that you replied to my post.

 

Yep I kinda thought it would be a matter of panel and swage edges but was i a bit unsure if their was a trick.

 

I would love to learn proper coach painting I like the old ways especially when it comes to narrowboats and trains.

 

Much respect dave and blinking vinyl can bugger off.

 

Thank you

Only by superstitious people.

 

2 true, I've actually seen a ghost in real life and had a picture to prove it but superstition is always in the eye of the beholder.

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I am a paint sprayer but those sign writers and coach painters in my book have more skill.

 

Anyhow say we have a boat and it was called something naff and we wanted to change the name what's the crack?

 

Do they sand the whole bordered box area down and start afresh or do they have a trick up their sleeve and just paint the area near the name?

 

Maybe this is a daft question.

A good spray painter has skills which are just as worthy as those equally as good with a brush.

 

Sign writing is in a different league though, requiring artistic talent as well as technical skill.

 

Name changes are supposed to bring bad luck. Personally I think its worth the risk if you can't live with the original!

 

On the subject of preparing the name panel, it will need thoroughly flatting off else the original artwork will grin through when you catch it in the light.

 

edited to say

I see daves already explained the process - enough said!

Edited by bag 'o' bones
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A good spray painter has skills which are just as worthy as those equally as good with a brush.

 

Sign writing is in a different league though, requiring artistic talent as well as technical skill.

 

Name changes are supposed to bring bad luck. Personally I think its worth the risk if you can't live with the original!

 

On the subject of preparing the name panel, it will need thoroughly flatting off else the original artwork will grin through when you catch it in the light.

Yer but I am still amazed at some braid bar boat paint finishes, I was a pro vehicle paint sprayer/refinisher for vw/audi/volvo for years but narr I still think the brush painters have more skill.

 

They amaze me and I would love that skill.

 

Maybe I will go to college again and learn the old ways.

 

 

The prep work is always the same whether brush or spray, it's all about detail.

 

Being honest I think my previous job has affected my life in the way of obsessive thinking about details.

 

Truth that.

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Yer but I am still amazed at some braid bar boat paint finishes, I was a pro vehicle paint sprayer/refinisher for vw/audi/volvo for years but narr I still think the brush painters have more skill.

 

They amaze me and I would love that skill.

 

Maybe I will go to college again and learn the old ways.

 

 

The prep work is always the same whether brush or spray, it's all about detail.

 

Being honest I think my previous job has affected my life in the way of obsessive thinking about details.

 

Truth that.

I think your dumbing yourself down. I seem to recall Phil Speight mentioned he paid to have his classic car spray painted by someone else as he felt he lacked the spraying skills to do it himself to high standard.

 

Prep detail is important but also the experience of the material itself.

Edited by bag 'o' bones
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I think your dumbing yourself down. I seem to recall Phil Speight mentioned he paid to have his classic car spray painted by someone else as he felt he lacked the spraying skills to do it himself to high standard.

 

Prep detail is important but also the experience of the material itself.

Yer I kinda do that but cars are a different ball bag. Lol

 

OMG I feel my age saying ball bag.

 

Blinking parents. Lol

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I would have no hesitation in buying a boat with a naff name and re-naming it, and I wouldn't consider it to be "bad luck" to do so. My own boat, Desiree, is not what I would name a boat if I had one built, however it is the name of the wife of Malcolm Rhodes, who did the beautiful fit out, and whose personal boat it was for over 20 years, and as Malcolm Rhodes is a very well known and respected person in the boatbuilding community and as my boat is nearly 30 years old I consider the name to be a part of the history I inherited when I bought her. Had it been called "Narrow Escape" or "Meand'er" then I would have changed the name as soon as I had lawful ownership.

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"Maybe this is a daft question" it's OK really! quite good by my standards.

But you might think my answer is daft. Me' I would use plastic labels. But reading between the lines, you don't seem to like them,

 

So stick some sellotape round the frame to mask it. Go over the panel with a roller repeatedly until all signs of the old name have gone. Get an aerosol spray for the new name.....or a passing yobbo would be happy to do it for you..... show them the name in writing....they probably can't spell,

 

Or as a last resort, follow the advice others have given

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Changing a boat name is seen as bad luck.

 

Not necessarily.

If the name is changed without the proper ceremonies i.e. total removal of old name, paper boat bearing old name sent sailing down the cut, virgin sacrifice (good luck finding one,BTW), etc, etc, then the luck of the old name may well remain with the boat. If this is good, then there is no problem. Only if it is bad (boat has been sunk, involved in collision, etc) is the full bhuna of the name changing ceremonies required.

 

It is thought by some that the association with bad luck comes about due to the removal of the name which, in most wooden ships, was deeply carved into the transom. The cutting away of the transom around the old name weakened a fairly vital part of the ship. blush.pngbiggrin.pngcool.png

 

 

Iain

Kelpie (formerly Prairie Crocus II)

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