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NB Alnwick

Three Way Fridge - maintenance?

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1 hour ago, Arthur Marshall said:

I'm going to get a new flex pipe fitted - current one is too short so i cant get the fridge out to fettle it. 

It musn't be more than 1 metre long, or it is a BSS fail.

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6 hours ago, alan_fincher said:

It musn't be more than 1 metre long, or it is a BSS fail.

Unless you have a sensible BSS inspector who will accept a standard 1200/1250 mm cooker bayonet hose despite it being slightly longer than 1 metre and not having a red stripe.  (But I don't know what your pipe sizes are.)

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3 hours ago, system 4-50 said:

Unless you have a sensible BSS inspector who will accept a standard 1200/1250 mm cooker bayonet hose despite it being slightly longer than 1 metre and not having a red stripe.  (But I don't know what your pipe sizes are.)

 

I didn't see anything that actually permitted this, unless I missed it.  I found a clear reference to 1 metre maximum.

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1 hour ago, alan_fincher said:

 

I didn't see anything that actually permitted this, unless I missed it.  I found a clear reference to 1 metre maximum.

The letter of the Law does not, but the technology moves on faster than the Law can keep up with it.  Or, more probably, the general Law (ex EU?) has moved on so that the marketplace now has the slightly longer hose available as standard, coloured yellow and with no red stripe.  Give it another 5 years and the BSS will have caught up.  Perhaps MTB will give us a gas industry view when he surfaces? All IMHO as I am no expert.

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Of course the inclusion of a bayonet itself doesn't help with gas fridge diagnoses in confined spaces.  You need the cooker to be connected to the gas to do such diagnoses!

I still think a flexible hose over 1m couuld be a BSS fail.

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We solved the getting the thing lit problem by putting it in a skip and buying an electric one. Sorry, not helpful I know but I got so sick of spending hours on my knees trying to get it going it had to go. Mind you, it was getting on a bit so was more than likely knackered anyway.Never found it very efficient anyway.

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1 hour ago, alan_fincher said:

Of course the inclusion of a bayonet itself doesn't help with gas fridge diagnoses in confined spaces.  You need the cooker to be connected to the gas to do such diagnoses!

I still think a flexible hose over 1m couuld be a BSS fail.

I believe there is also a legal requirement for the flexible hose and any other gas fittings or appliances to be installed by someone who is Gas Safe qualified. This is why, in the past, we have avoided taking on such tasks on a DIY basis - my qualifications enable me to manufacture or dispose of gas equipment but I am not qualified to connect, disconnect or re-connect them.

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2 hours ago, system 4-50 said:

The letter of the Law does not, but the technology moves on faster than the Law can keep up with it.  Or, more probably, the general Law (ex EU?) has moved on so that the marketplace now has the slightly longer hose available as standard, coloured yellow and with no red stripe.  Give it another 5 years and the BSS will have caught up.  Perhaps MTB will give us a gas industry view when he surfaces? All IMHO as I am no expert.

 

 

Not really. I never lower myself to dealing with cookers so I've no idea!!

 

(Gas cooker owners are even bigger cheapskates than boaters...)

 

 

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Anyway, I found I could manage with the current hose by dismantling the side of the kitchen unit... and, thanks to Bizzard's suggestion of using a filament from a wire brush to clean out the nozzle, I now appear to have a working fridge again.  Hole was amost completely blocked.

All I've got to do now is rebuld the blasted kitchen, but it's a bit cheaper than the alternative. I really didn't want an electric fridge as I only have one domestic battery and fitting more would be a right pain.

So, if Bizzard happens to read this, thanks again.

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21 hours ago, Arthur Marshall said:

Anyway, I found I could manage with the current hose by dismantling the side of the kitchen unit... and, thanks to Bizzard's suggestion of using a filament from a wire brush to clean out the nozzle, I now appear to have a working fridge again.  Hole was amost completely blocked.

All I've got to do now is rebuld the blasted kitchen, but it's a bit cheaper than the alternative. I really didn't want an electric fridge as I only have one domestic battery and fitting more would be a right pain.

So, if Bizzard happens to read this, thanks again.

That's good. I've heard of many folk chucking them and cookers away just because the jets were bunged up.  Although wire brush bristles do the job, I have a set of tiny watch makers drill bits which are better because as you pass the bit into the jet and twiddle it cockwise it will screw out the goo towards you and away. Often the jets will unscrew and can be removed for cleaning, When unleaded petrol was introduced cars with fixed jet carburetters like Solex, Zenith, Webber ect kept blocking their idling jets, a poke through with a wire brush brisle and a blow through with compressed air sorted them, until the next time, although by keeping shots of Redex in the tank kept them clean.

Edited by bizzard
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In the past I'm sure I have seen it suggested you should not poke anything down a jet hole, because there may be some very fine gauze material that gets damaged.

 

That has always seemed highly unlikely to me, given the small size of the hole.

 

So is such advice scaremongering?

Or is it some other LPG device to which this applies, such as pilot light on an instantaneous gas water heater?

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4 minutes ago, bizzard said:

That's good. I've heard of many folk chucking them and cookers away just because the jets were bunged up. 

 

This only seems to happen on LPG appliances. Never natural gas. 

 

There was a thread on here a year or two back by someone whose oven would not heat up properly but sadly no-one suggested the jet might be partially blocked with goo. Then Last year I bought a boat and the oven did exactly the same and with careful testing I concluded the jet was too small. So I removed the oven jet to identify it and either drill it out or buy the next size up, guess what? Full of goo! First time I’d ever encountered a goo-blocked gas jet in my hole career :)  

 

The odd thing is none of the other jets shows any sign of goo-blocking. 

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3 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

This only seems to happen on LPG appliances. Never natural gas. 

 

There was a thread on here a year or two back by someone whose oven would not heat up properly but sadly no-one suggested the jet might be partially blocked with goo. Then Last year I bought a boat and the oven did exactly the same and with careful testing I concluded the jet was too small. So I removed the oven jet to identify it and either drill it out or buy the next size up, guess what? Full of goo! First time I’d ever encountered a goo-blocked gas jet in my hole career :)  

 

The odd thing is none of the other jets shows any sign of goo-blocking. 

Oven jets seem to be prone to it. I think it might be fatty fumes still swirling around in there after being turned off.

8 minutes ago, alan_fincher said:

In the past I'm sure I have seen it suggested you should not poke anything down a jet hole, because there may be some very fine gauze material that gets damaged.

 

That has always seemed highly unlikely to me, given the small size of the hole.

 

So is such advice scaremongering?

Or is it some other LPG device to which this applies, such as pilot light on an instantaneous gas water heater?

You don't poke the probe very far in, only about 1/4'' maximum, its all about feel and having a steady hand and gentle touch.

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4 minutes ago, bizzard said:

 

You don't poke the probe very far in, only about 1/4'' maximum, its all about feel and having a steady hand and gentle touch.

 

I’ve never seen a gauze or anything other than plain gas pipe behind a gas jet. The advice not to poke them out is virtually universal in manufacturers service instructions as the more stupid end of the spectrum WILL force pointy instruments through and open out the hole. Sometimes the hole in a pilot jet is in a thin disc of aluminium so very easily opened out but on NG appliances this can get blocked with soot not goo, and is FAR smaller than a main burner gas jet. 

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7 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

I’ve never seen a gauze or anything other than plain gas pipe behind a gas jet. The advice not to poke them out is virtually universal in manufacturers service instructions as the more stupid end of the spectrum WILL force pointy instruments through and open out the hole. Sometimes the hole in a pilot jet is in a thin disc of aluminium so very easily opened out but on NG appliances this can get blocked with soot not goo, and is FAR smaller than a main burner gas jet. 

As Mick Jagger would say,''Its a gas'' init.

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