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Speedy23

2LW cold starting (noob questions....)

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Hi all

 

Please could anyone tell me what the complete cold start procedure is for a 2LW? Do the primers have to be used as well as the cold start button? Throttle setting?

 

Should the engine fire immediately on turning over?

 

Also, does the "engine stop" lever work by cutting off the supply of fuel to the injector pump?

 

(Said they were noob questions....)

 

Thanks

 

S23

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Hi,

 

I find my 2LW an 'easy starter' in cold weather (compared with other vintage engines I know of!).

 

Push the cold start button once, half throttle and hit the starter, normally fires up quickly - really cold, I turn it over a couple of times with the decompression lever open, this saves the battery.

 

I have seen a 6L2 with a small meths burner under the air intake but suspect this is a bit extreme.

 

Have fun, if leaving it for a while in cold weather an old duvet spread over it helps protect it, especially if you have a 'pigeon box' above it.

 

L

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Firstly, is your 2LW newly rebuilt, or already run in? When mine was fresh from rebuilding at Walsh's it was a pig to start in very cold weather because all the innards were so tight. A friend got it going by firing a blow lamp down the air intake for about 30 seconds, not sure if this is recommended or not.

Now she's well run in, I advance the throttle about a quarter way (I have a single-lever control), raise the decompresser, pump the two priming levers a couple of times then turn the key. She does take several seconds to fire properly - I get puffs of smoke from the chimney some time before the engine is properly engaged. I have simply to ignore the cries of pain from the starter motor and keep going for a bit longer.

Once she has fired, I give several bursts on the throttle before returning the lever to the tickover position. The engine generally keeps going, even in very cold weather, but the beat is irregular, rising and falling for maybe two minutes before settling into that lovely "wom-bat wom-bat" beat which is probably one of the reasons you chose the engine in the first place!

I should add that I am not a technically practical man and, though this method works for me, it may be strictly incorrect. There are quite a few other Gardner owners on this forum and I'm sure some of them will be along soon to tell you the proper way to do it.

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First, check oil and water.

Then:-

 

1. Make sure the stop lever is in the 'go' position

2. Open the throttle maybe halfway

3. Press up the cold start button (under the little box at the front end of the injector pump

4. Start engine.

5. Check for oil pressure. This does take quite a (disconcerting) while to establish with some engines.

 

You should only need to use the priming levers in extreme cold, or if the fuel system pipework has been disturbed.

If you have a large alternator and low batteries, there might be a tendency to stall once the engine has fired up and the stop button reset itself. In that case, either set the throttle a bit higher, or hold up the cold start button just for the few moments that it takes for the engine to settle.

 

The stop lever just moves the fuel pump elements to the 'no fuel' position, so they are not pumping anything to the sprayers.

 

Tim

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Tim, how would I check the oil pressure? I haven't got a gauge which shows it as far as I am aware. I have an oil thermometer mounted on the engine, that's all.

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Hi Speedy. Sounds like the others have given you all you need but have you got a Gardner manual which should also help? If you need one try here http://www.internalfire.com/ifod/mantree.php but you will need to register and donate to their museum.

 

I fully agree with this "5. Check for oil pressure. This does take quite a (disconcerting) while to establish with some engines.", my engine (3LW) is certailnly disconcerting in this respect but it does exactly what the manual says, which I recollect mentions 10 seconds to get normal oil pressure.

 

I have just seen the reply re no gauge, Fit one asap, it goes on the pipe from the filter/regulator assembly where you should have an oil pressure switch.

 

Chris

 

PS I recently sent the Internal Fire team a pdf copy of the following Gardner info, which should eventually be available from them

  • LW type General Directions for the management and care of Gardner Oil Engines, Book No 42.8 dated 1945. 57 pages.
  • LW Type Workshop Tools, Equipment and Instructional Drawings Book No 48.1 dated approx 1945 (from the drawing dates), 70 pages.
  • LW and LW20 Diesel Engines Spare Parts Catalogue, Book No 600.2, December 1969, 126 pages

These are much too big to email but PM me if you want a copy and for the cost of a blank CD and postage.......

 

Edited to add press guage comment, and again to correct my lousy typing!

Edited by jonesthenuke

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Jones, the engine seems to have worked for seven years without this gauge. What difference will it make?

I have got an entire LW manual taken from the internet, can't remember where from but it was free. I understand very little of it but it's useful for printing off pages for the chap who looks after my engine, who seems able to make sense of it.

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Athy, I generally agree, any engine will run without an oil pressure guage but its a useful tool to indicate if anything is going adrift, though its best not to get over sensitive about any small changes. The pressure switches used for indicating low oil pressure are often set so low that they are of limited use if monitoring under cruising conditions. I guess this is really personal preference when it comes down to it?

Chris

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Thank you Chris. But what would low oil pressure tell me? I check the oil regularly to make sure it is up to the level (the engine does not appear to use any) but have no idea how many psi it should work at, or why.

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Athy

Gardners should run at either 45 psi or 35 (if later version) at normal temperature and at 1000 RPM. The pump delivers more than is needed to achieve this and the pressure is regulated to 45 by a valve attached to the oil filter. The excess oil lubricated other parts of the system (governor etc) whilst the 45 psi is directed to the bearings and so on.

 

Some info from the General Directions book (the numbers are the book paragraph numbers):-

 

24.The pressure gauge should read not less than 45 psi after starting from cold while the engine is running at 1000 rpm. If this pressure not be registered stop the engine and investigate.

 

25. After starting the engine and interval of 10 to fifteen seconds is necessary for the pipe and filter system to become filled by the lubrication pump, consequently, during this period the gauge will not be expected to record any pressure.

 

47. On no account should the engine be run if the oil pressure is less than 40 psi at cruising speed.

 

48. Oil pressure too low, possible causes:-

  • Delivery filter needs cleaning.
  • Foreign matter under the seat of the pressure regulation valve.
  • Fracture of the spring of the regulation valve.
  • Sprayer pipe unions slack allowing fuel to reach the crankcase.
  • The gauze filter over the sump is choked for want of attention.
  • Shortage of oil in the sump
  • A pipe fracture somewhere in the system.
  • Worn bearings or bearing failure.

Hope this is of use.

Chris

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...

3. Press up the cold start button (under the little box at the front end of the injector pump

...

Tim

My Gardner manual suggests that the throttle lever may need some manual assistance to move to the cold start position.

I find that rattling the throttle lever before pressing the button frees it up.

 

It also suggests that the wise engineer will allow the engine to warm up before applying a load - which is contrary to the advice for modern car engines.

 

I too use the decompressor to reduce the load on the battery - the lever is within reach of the starter button so I operate the starter then drop the decompressor when the engine reaches maximum speed - as you would with manual cranking.

 

If it is really cold I have been known to turn the engine over a few turns by hand on the large pulley. It now occurs to me that this also operates the injector pumps.

 

Alan

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Athy,

 

This is where I take my oil pressure from. I run an 8mm copper pipe (from plumb base etc) using compression fittings to a old brass pressure gauge (bourdon gauge). You can get these on ebay - a 0-60 psig or 0-50 psig gauge should be best.

 

Hydraulic braided brake hose can be used to connect if you dont want to use copper.

 

IMG_5381_zps2a021efb.jpg

 

They are best roof mounted (use a bulkhead fitting through roof) or in a position you can see them when steering.

 

It's a nice easy project to do. And more brass to polish.

 

IMAG2640_zps0d2b951a.jpg

 

The above one is mounted off the head bolt using a simple bracket made from aluminum and is connected using braided brake hose at the gauge end.

Edited by mark99

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Sorry about the delay in replying....thanks to everyone who replied, very much appreciated and double thank you to Chris for the PDFs.

 

Cheers

 

S23

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Yes, thank you - I was a bit concerned as it didn't start immediately from cold but had to be turned over for a couple of seconds before it fired - I now think this is normal for this engine? The last classic engine I was involved with (more than a few years ago) was a Lister HA3 and it seemed to me to fire up a bit more readily (but the 2LW sounds a lot better!!!).

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