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Alway Swilby

Shropshire Union Woodseaves Cutting

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Does anyone have some local information regarding this stoppage. We are heading that way and could do with knowing if the stoppage is probably going on for months or if it's likely to open tomorrow?

 

Shropshire Union Canal
Location: Bridge 58 Hollins Bridge, Shropshire Union Canal
Starts At: Bridge 58, Hollins Bridge
Ends At: Bridge 58, Hollins Bridge
Up Stream Winding Hole: Goldstone Wharf Winding Hole
Down Stream Winding Hole: Tyrley Wharf Winding Hole

Tuesday 25 February 2020 15:00 until further notice

Type: Navigation Closure
Reason: Vegetation

Update on 06/03/2020:

Engineers have inspected the affected area and are advising contractors the best way forward, to safely remove the trees that are blocking the navigation.

A further update will be provided next week.

Update on 28/02/2020:

Tyrley cutting will remain closed to canal and towpath users whilst our geotechnical experts assess the stability of the slopes ahead of the proposed removal of fallen trees. There was a further slip on Wednesday evening and we will continue to monitor the situation next week as recent rainfall continues to take it’s toll. We are hoping to conduct a further inspection next week and will discuss methods of working with our contractors and ensure it reopens as soon as possible. This has been a particularly challenging few weeks for our teams and your understanding and patience is appreciated. 

Original message:

As a result of land slip, a number of trees are blocking both navigation and towpath at this location.

Contractors have been informed and are in the process of assessing the site.

Sorry for any inconvenience caused. We will provide an update on Thursday 27th February.

You can view this notice and its map online here:

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Not surprised considering the winter we have had and the structure of the cutting.

The whole embankment is some sort of loose shale which must resemble some sort of lumpy porridge after all the recent rain

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2 hours ago, tree monkey said:

Not surprised considering the winter we have had and the structure of the cutting.

The whole embankment is some sort of loose shale which must resemble some sort of lumpy porridge after all the recent rain

CRT’s geotechnical engineers won’t have slept well these past few weeks. The resulting deposition of trees in the the canal following a land slip also helps debunk the oft quoted - and largely mythical - idea that trees are beneficial to the stability of earthworks.

 

JP

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3 minutes ago, Captain Pegg said:

CRT’s geotechnical engineers won’t have slept well these past few weeks. The resulting deposition of trees in the the canal following a land slip also helps debunk the oft quoted - and largely mythical - idea that trees are beneficial to the stability of earthworks.

 

JP

Only if they dont have enough top weight and windage to pull it down, maybe a bit of coppasing 

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1 minute ago, Captain Pegg said:

CRT’s geotechnical engineers won’t have slept well these past few weeks. The resulting deposition of trees in the the canal following a land slip also helps debunk the oft quoted - and largely mythical - idea that trees are beneficial to the stability of earthworks.

 

JP

As always it's complicated, trees and other veg can help but a tall tree exposed to the wind is a lever, add to the fact its growing in runny porridge,  plus add fairly extreme wet weather, it's not brain surgery 

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1 minute ago, tree monkey said:

As always it's complicated, trees and other veg can help but a tall tree exposed to the wind is a lever, add to the fact its growing in runny porridge,  plus add fairly extreme wet weather, it's not brain surgery 

In Norfolk we have pollarded willows for years so that the roots support the road/lane Image result for pollarding willow

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Just now, ditchcrawler said:

Only if they dont have enough top weight and windage to pull it down, maybe a bit of coppasing 

It's a possibility but the substrate is not exactly stable and there is a lot of big mature beech which don't coppice, a lot of the big trees are also reaching above the cutting so exposing them to additional wind stress.

Actually it's that unstable I wouldn't be that keen to operate a saw up there either

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Just now, tree monkey said:

It's a possibility but the substrate is not exactly stable and there is a lot of big mature beech which don't coppice, a lot of the big trees are also reaching above the cutting so exposing them to additional wind stress.

Actually it's that unstable I wouldn't be that keen to operate a saw up there either

Like a bit late in the day. I know what you mean about working up there, not a nice thought

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Just now, ditchcrawler said:

In Norfolk we have pollarded willows for years so that the roots support the road/lane Image result for pollarding willow

Classic wetland willow management, I do love to see it, but the stroppy cuttings are in a different league, 

Just now, ditchcrawler said:

Like a bit late in the day. I know what you mean about working up there, not a nice thought

I got asked to have a look a good few years ago, I told them the trees wasn't the problem, it needs engineers 

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13 hours ago, ditchcrawler said:

In Norfolk we have pollarded willows for years so that the roots support the road/lane Image result for pollarding willow

Around Burscough, the roots of willows like these were used as filters for sewage. The withies were cut each year and used by the local basket makers, especially for the baskets used for collecting potatoes. So human sewage was used to improve the land for cultivating potatoes, and human sewage was used to help in their collection. Sewage and street sweepings, ie horse manure, was carried by canal from Liverpool to West Lancashire, over 150,000 tons being carried annually at the peak of this traffic, which only ceased in the early 1950s. I was told that it was not pleasant following one of the manure boats.

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