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Sitting low in water


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When Juno's engine received some professional TLC recently, the guy who did it commented that her stern was sitting low compared to other boats he'd worked on, so low in fact that the relief exhaust was under water and probably causing the engine problems we were encountering due to back pressure on the exhaust. He resolved this by adjusting the trim but advised we checked out why the stern was down.

 

First two possibilities were the amount of crap in the deck locker (9 windlasses, two anchors, heaven knows how many half empty oil cartons etc) and the water tank at the front being nearly empty. However, suspcion is now falling on two compartments in the boats hull, one under the locker which holds the fuel tank, one under the locker which holds the batteries. These compartments are not accessible, and may have filled with water over the 22 year life of the boat.

 

Would it be wise to create an inspection hatch in them? Two things concern me, the base of the lockers is not just a piece of wood but is integral with the boat structure, so I don't take the idea of drilling holes in it lightly, and second, would this allow petrol fumes into the compartment below the tank? On the other hand, if I don't do it, how do I assess whether these compartments are the problem?

 

For Info, Juno is a viking 23

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Can you slip the boat easily and cheaply? If they have developed a leak under water it will show up as the water seeps out again.

 

Or - make the hole and look see then fill them with expanding foam to prevent any vapour build up, reseal with glass matt and resin from Halfords.

 

Edited to add: a 3" hole cutter should do a neat job of making the inspection hole. Keep the cut out bit, then no-nail some small blocks on the inside of the compartment to sit it on when you're finished. Pop the cut out back in and seal as above. A coat of gel or paint over that will ensure it's waterproof (matt and resin isn't).

Edited by twbm
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Can you slip the boat easily and cheaply? If they have developed a leak under water it will show up as the water seeps out again.

 

Or - make the hole and look see then fill them with expanding foam to prevent any vapour build up, reseal with glass matt and resin from Halfords.

 

It's been out of the water for anti-fouling, but something that has seeped in over 20 years doesn't seep very quickly... could it be condensation anyway?

 

Get a cheap, inline drill powered pump, drill a hole a bit bigger than the pump hose, stick hose in hole and empty compartment, seal hole with a gobbet of Marineflex.

 

Thanks Carl, useful suggestion.

 

I herard you the first time though ;)

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... Or - make the hole and look see then fill them with expanding foam to prevent any vapour build up, reseal with glass matt and resin from Halfords.

Ye Gods!!

As a point of principle always try to do a modification with a similar material to the original construction. Over time the repair / modification looks more natural, and will also stand a better chance of changing due to damp, temperature, etc, at a more similar rate as the original material. This minimises stress between the two materials and stops the joint working loose.

 

I have no objection to boring a hole, perhaps sizing it to take a 'cheap off ebay' camera on a stick. But closing it off again should be a wooden plug, even if it isn't from the same tree, but a piece of dowel, trimmed to a taper fit, and dunked in creosote (or its modern equivalent) before fitting.

 

HTH.

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Sorry - thought a Viking was GRP - if not then good point.

Unless, at some point, you want to do the job again, when a sealant plug will be easier to pull out, and replace.

 

You could even use a rubber bung or blind grommet.

 

 

I herard you the first time though ;)

Sorry, my computer or broadband connection is stuttering to a halt then speeding up again.

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They are, but they are not as GRP as you think. There is plenty of structural wood in them, at least if the are 1989 build

 

Osmosis perhaps into the bits that are plastic. Seen its effects over the years in the blue water community in older and not so old boats. Good luck if it is because it is a swine to cure. Can you get full plans of the boat as a 3d cutaway of the area you are investigating may help with any surgery.

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Osmosis perhaps into the bits that are plastic. Seen its effects over the years in the blue water community in older and not so old boats. Good luck if it is because it is a swine to cure. Can you get full plans of the boat as a 3d cutaway of the area you are investigating may help with any surgery.

If the effects of Osmosis were bad enough to make the boat sit noticeably low in the water, then the blisters would be visible, on the hard, when the anti-foul was being slapped on.

 

I wouldn't have thought a Viking, in fresh water, would have that much of an osmosis problem, anyway.

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If the effects of Osmosis were bad enough to make the boat sit noticeably low in the water, then the blisters would be visible, on the hard, when the anti-foul was being slapped on.

 

I wouldn't have thought a Viking, in fresh water, would have that much of an osmosis problem, anyway.

 

And there were none. Gel coat had been chipped at the corners, and I patched it, but perhaps enough seepage had occured? Or perhaps I'm barking up entirely the wrong tree and these compartments are fine.

 

And yes, the operative word for these compartments is UNDER the fuel tank and battery bank... Wakey Tone...

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I had a Viking 26 wide beam,the one with the under cockpit deck cabin, to reach the chambers (bilges) you are referring to, there was a hatch inside the under deck cabin which you could remove and inspect the bilges which is what I assume you are referring to.The Viking widebeam is a bit of different boat to the narrowbeam Vikings, I am not sure if the following applies to the Vikings but on most GRP cruisers there will be a drain plug or tap low down on the back of the hull(under water when afloat). When we trailer out any GRP boats we always check for a plug or tap and drain them on the trailer. I can't be 100% about this model Viking but know a man who is PM me if you want me to find out for certain

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