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Ffrwd Branch of the Ellesmere Canal


Heartland
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For those interested there is a rather lovely evocation of this area in “Black Lion Crossing”, a model railway based on the area though not of a specific location, built by Geoff Kent. There are buildings modelled on ones Geoff photographed back in the fifties.

https://www.flickriver.com/photos/simage61/33936559678/

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5 hours ago, davidg said:

For those interested there is a rather lovely evocation of this area in “Black Lion Crossing”, a model railway based on the area though not of a specific location, built by Geoff Kent. There are buildings modelled on ones Geoff photographed back in the fifties.

https://www.flickriver.com/photos/simage61/33936559678/

What a stunning set of modelling images and skills!

Love this one:

Midland Sidings, Scalefour North 2019

 

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On 15/08/2022 at 21:44, Derek R. said:

What a stunning set of modelling images and skills!

Love this one:

Midland Sidings, Scalefour North 2019

 

The London & North Western Railway Company owned the Birmingham Canal Navigations, and the Shropshire Union Railways and Canal Company.

 

The industries in the Black Country tended to be set up by the Canals.

 

It was easier for the Railway Companies to build interchange basins, like in the photo, and use canal boats to collect cargoes, for transhipment to the railways in these interchanges. 🙂

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The London & North Western Railway Company owned the Birmingham Canal Navigations, and the Shropshire Union Railways and Canal Company.

 

The industries in the Black Country tended to be set up by the Canals.

 

It was easier for the Railway Companies to build interchange basins, like in the photo, and use canal boats to collect cargoes, for transhipment to the railways in these interchanges. 🙂

 

ER NO QUITE ROIT

 

The London & North Western Railway DID NOT own the BCN, but under the London & Birmingham Railway Arrangement Act did guarentee share dividends.

 

The Industries in the Black Country were often close to waterways, but that was only a proportion and some were on hills and served by tramways and the term"Black Cpuntry" only covered a specific area , As counties were concerned it was an area that covered East Worcestershire and South Staffordshire and a part that once belonged to Shropshire. Prior to the canals the turnpikes and earlier highways provided road transport to the mines, charcoal iron furnaces and glassworks

 

Because of the proliferation of waterways canal and railway interchange became common in order for goods to be interchanged between canalside works and railway basin. 

 

The model of the Midland Railway basin seems to be based on that at Wolverhampton which was served by the BCN (Wrley & Essington)

 

The Frood Branch as mentioned in previous posts seems to have had an incline section. My original post came about through organising the RCHS Wrexham Weekend 2018, whose extended tour notes have had a copy deposited with the National Library of Wales. I did look at the Tithe maps as part of that study copies of which have been reproduced above by Bucaneer. They provided a useful study of the extent of the canal

 

 

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13 hours ago, Heartland said:

I did look at the Tithe maps as part of that study copies of which have been reproduced above by Bucaneer. They provided a useful study of the extent of the canal

The Welsh Tithe maps are very useful I've traced other lost waterways using them.

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