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starman

Advice about plywood please

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4 hours ago, Bee said:

Its the damp innit. Anything that is dry will last ok but as soon as the edges get damp its in trouble. Even condensation is only a big problem when it runs down cold steel or glass and pools somewhere where it gets wicked up by some sort of particle board/ply/solid wood. As far as the problems of replacing soggy bathroom flooring is concerned, or soggy flooring anywhere in fact, it really should be best practice that flooring does not run under bulkheads or walls. It should be possible to lift sections to get access to underneath. I've never actually done it that way, its hellish time consuming or expensive but I think I would if I did another boat.

Interesting thoughts. I will be replacing the bathroom floor with a layer of GRP over something decent when the time comes. Bit like a wetroom.

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20 minutes ago, Murflynn said:

nuff said.

The next "modern" kitchen  fell to bits in less than four years. I put it in the grey bin for landfill disposal, bit by bit. No use even for firewood.

I have lived in houses where the original fittings survive, after one hundred years,  they are mostly local wood, built by carpenters. 

Edited by LadyG

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4 hours ago, LadyG said:

It was the cabinet doors that de laminated, in my innocence I assumed they were wood, but they were wallpaper on top of chipboard. The original cabinets fitted in 1965 did not de-laminated, the doors fell off their hinges and fell to pieces , after only forty years!

A refund is in order....

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Wood ain't what it used to be..  chopped up some pitch pine sash window frames dating back to 1790. Not a spot of rot on them. After 200 years. 

Had a bay window frame replaced in about 1990 lasted about 7 years. Like balsa wood. I think it's down to commercial foresters not letting trees properly mature. Or lack of proper lead based oil paint. 

There's a lot of crap plywood out there, I think it warrants buying the best considering how much work it takes to install it to your satisfaction. 

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