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nicknorman

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Everything posted by nicknorman

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  11. Yes the heat position is for the glow plug heaters. Not all engines with glow plug heaters have a separate heat position though - eg some Listers have a timed relay such that the glow plugs come on automatically when the ignition is turned on, and go off when the timed relay opens, thus making it "transparent" to the user. On your first comment just be aware that if you do go for a generic panel, you need to be confident that the gauges match with the senders on the engine, either because they are directly compatible, or because the gauges are configurable.
  12. Instrument panel gauges are not really specific to the engine they are attached to but they are specific to the senders that are attached to the engine for the oil pressure and coolant temperature. That said, the description does imply that this panel can be configured to suit a variety of senders. Ditto the tacho would have to be adjusted to match the pulley ratio and number of pole pairs on the alternator. So it would probably work, but it is hard to know the quality and robustness of the panel without seeing it in the flesh. And what about glow plug heaters, there doesn’t seem to be provision for that?
  13. I think it’s a case of the excessive side force wearing the bearing which allows a bit of play which wears the seal. Not really a reversible process.
  14. They've been around for quite a long time. Often referred to as LiPo. Used in most or all mobile phones, model flying things etc. Fairly unstable compared to LiFePO4 but not as bad as the cobalt ones.
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  16. Yes for long term ie weeks, months etc it is better to use a voltage of around 13.2v which keeps the batteries nearly fully charged but minimises “positive plate corrosion” which can shorten the life of a battery left on charge for long periods. In your case, float at 13.8 would be a better option since you are only there for a few days.
  17. As I explained, the propensity to slip is related to the load on the alternator which is related to the size and state of charge of the battery. So it seems that the pulley that was slipping badly, is now spinning ok despite being worn and polished, as the load is minimal. The one that was previously not loaded and hence not polished and worn from extensive slipping, is for the time being working better. Did you tighten the belt at the same time? Anyway, I would get a new belt and stay on top of keeping it correctly tensioned. Clean off the black dust. If it recurs this indicates the belt is slipping.
  18. No. My point was that the reported voltage was too low to be explained away by a fully functional alternator being pulled down by low batteries. The reported voltage indicates something is wrong. Quite possibly belt slip.
  19. From your description I’d say slightly over tightened. Twisting 90 degrees is a fair way to assess but only using moderate force. If you say “I can just twist it 90 degrees using maximum force” then that is too much. Put it another way, it needs to be just tight enough to avoid slippage, but not more. So back it off until it just squeals under max load at low rpm, then tighten slightly. Then note how much force is required to twist 90 degrees for future reference.
  20. I disagree. OP reported 12.8v which is too low for a reasonable size of alternator. Yes of course low batteries will reduce the alternator voltage, but not by anything like that much. Mid to high 13s would be reasonable.
  21. The other option would be to restore the Travelpower and use it to run a battery charger.
  22. Yes it could just be a loose belt. You can try tightening but it may be worn. V belts are designed to contact the V shaped sides of the pulleys. If the belt or the pulleys get too worn, the bottom of the Vbelt can contact the bottom of the pulley and so there is no force on the V sides (which have a much better contact area). So even if you tighten it correctly, it can still slip. Have a close look at the bottom of the V on the pulley - if it is shiny, this indicates the belt has been bottoming out on it due to being too worn. New belt required. This design of alternator drive with 2 alternators on 1 belt (and a water pump) is not a great design as the “wrap” (% of the pulley in contact with the belt) isn’t great and it can be a bit marginal at the best of times even with belt and pulley in good condition.
  23. It would be an interesting test and shouldn’t cause a problem, but don’t disconnect anything with the engine running. But see my post about belt slip, it could just cause the other alternator to slip on the worn belt when it is loaded up by the flat domestic batteries. Only one way to find out! Edit: actually I’m not clear what you would be swapping. Are you going to end up swapping which alternator feeds which battery by this swap? Or just swapping the alternator and battery combination between domestic and leisure supplies? If the former, good test. If the latter, not sure what it would achieve.
  24. I’m a bit confused about your setup as the photos aren’t great. I think there are 2 alternators run by one V belt? Is one for the leisure batteries and one for the engine battery? And there is a polyvee belt in the picture, what is that for? Anyway, I would say that the leisure alternator is most likely knackered BUT as was mentioned, there is a lot of black dust which is indicative of belt slip. Can you rotate the leisure battery alternator pulley without the engine turning? If so it is slipping too much and probably the belt is worn to the point it’s not gripping due to being bottomed out in the pulley. It is worth bearing in mind that the propensity for the belt to slip depends on the electrical load on the alternator. Starting the engine uses probably less than 1 amp hour which is rapidly replaced and hence the load and propensity to slip on the engine alternator is minimal. By contrast low leisure batteries can take the full output of the alternator, maximum electrical and hence maximum mechanical load and hence could just be permanently slipping.
  25. No that isn’t suitable for measuring any significant current, and you have to disconnect wires and insert the probes in series. A good way to blow the meter, or at least its fuse! The clamp meter MtB mentioned is the easiest way to measure current from alternators etc, you just clip it over the wire and hey presto! Or you can still get the slightly cheaper Uni-t ut203. As I routinely say on here, electricity is invisible and so without adequate test equipment, we and you are just guessing. Lots of time is spent on guessing and false actions, when the solution is a £40 meter! Does not compute!
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