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Fly Navy

Double Glazing on narrow boats

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45 minutes ago, rusty69 said:

We suffered 17 winters with only one,and although warm in the bed, the woodwork was beginning to suffer. 

18 hours ago, Sea Dog said:

 Its the condensation on the frame itself that does the damage as the only place for that to trickle down to is the joinery.  

 

 

 

 

Treating the window joinery by rubbing a thin film of Barbours Thornproof Wax Dressing on it will prevent condensation from damaging the woodwork. Just a quick application every couple of months works a treat. 

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We have dg portholes with no condensation, dg side hatches with no condensation but the dg houdini hatch had frozen drips all around it this morning. 

Our Squirrel seams OK when it starts to get hot, about 20°, I just close the round vent and it stays about right. 

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A bit late to this...

 

Apologies for repeating what others have said.

 

When we got repainted, I took the opportunity to change the old Caldwell windows for new DG units from Channel Glaze, the windows fit well and look great with an anodised finish.  I had some bespoke Oak trims made for inside which took a bit of work but look the mutt's nuts now they are in.  I treated the wood with Osmo Oil. We get minimal condensation on the frames, but the Osmo protects the wood really well.

 

Advantages - 

Heat retention

Sound reduction

Better security

Looks the Biz

Adds value to the boat

  • Greenie 1

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On 03/02/2019 at 11:52, Fly Navy said:

SeaDog - have plenty of experience sailing yachts and owning and driving cabin cruisers but when I was thinking of what to do during retirement, it needed to encapsulate a series of interests.

Quite understand.  For me, after years of watching my yachtie mates taking their wives to sea in bad weather and wondering why she either wouldn't sail any more or wouldn't stay married to him, it was pretty simple to choose the inland waterways!  As with anything else in life, it's good to choose things which avoid having to give up half of your hard-earned pension in alimony!  :D

 

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On 03/02/2019 at 12:01, rusty69 said:

We suffered 17 winters with only one,and although warm in the bed, the woodwork was beginning to suffer. The morso at the pointy end has a back boiler, but unless it is roaring, the rad in the bedroom doesn't get that hot. I spose a pump may have improved things, but chose the other option.

I'm surprised that you have trouble with temperature, our gravity system heats the radiator when ticking over easily. What size pipework did you use?

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26 minutes ago, BWM said:

I'm surprised that you have trouble with temperature, our gravity system heats the radiator when ticking over easily. What size pipework did you use?

The main pipework is 28mm running three rads, however the connection to the final rad has a bit of 15mm in which doesn't help the situation. It does get very hot, but only when the stove is running above tickover otherwise it is only warm. 

 

Poor design probably, as the final rad was added at a later date. 

 

70 ft boat probably doesn't help matters. 

  • Happy 1

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we installed DG on our boat a couple of years ago, was not cheap but has made a massive difference to the boat. We went to Channelglaze.

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Only 4 single glazed windows, hardwood frames so no condensation there. 4 small DG portholes. Oh and a part glazed front door. Minimal misting on the glass in a morning.

Never felt the need to double glaze the windows, the sealed units are not guaranteed when in timber frames either.

Is the boat warm? How the hell should I know, not there in winter.

 

But when we did over winter aboard, we had to open windows when the Squirrel was going, it was snug. Houdinis open too.

 

Many boats just have too many windows in the first place.

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1 hour ago, Fly Navy said:

Price wise, whats the difference between exchanging a SG panel for a DG?

I used to work on 239% over the price of single plane float glass area for area.

Of course boat windows should be safety glazed, toughened glass on both panes, laminated is too thick usually to use in sealed units. On hire boats its compulsory to use safety glass

This will put the price up considerably.

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1 hour ago, Boater Sam said:

I used to work on 239% over the price of single plane float glass area for area.

Of course boat windows should be safety glazed, toughened glass on both panes, laminated is too thick usually to use in sealed units. On hire boats its compulsory to use safety glass

This will put the price up considerably.

When I made Col’s dogbox I specced the glazing units to be 4mm Safety glass on one side and 6.4mm laminated on the other, with a 6mm spacer bar. So they ended up 16.4mm thick. They were 824mm x 357mm and the four of them (just the glazed panels of course, not a window) were well under £200 if memory serves correctly. So having laminated or safety glass needn’t necessarily be expensive. 

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1 hour ago, WotEver said:

When I made Col’s dogbox I specced the glazing units to be 4mm Safety glass on one side and 6.4mm laminated on the other, with a 6mm spacer bar. So they ended up 16.4mm thick. They were 824mm x 357mm and the four of them (just the glazed panels of course, not a window) were well under £200 if memory serves correctly. So having laminated or safety glass needn’t necessarily be expensive. 

Ooh, and that really was a lovely dogbox! ?

  • Happy 1

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12 hours ago, Fly Navy said:

Is the price for double glazing - transparent enough?

It can be a bit obscure, but its all about a gap in the glazing market. ;)

 

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16 minutes ago, Sea Dog said:

It can be a bit obscure, but its all about a gap in the glazing market. ;)

 

I can't see what you are getting at.

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1 hour ago, Boater Sam said:

This post is becoming a pane, there is a pattern to it, obscure but its there. 

I thought double glazing had 2 panes?

1 hour ago, Boater Sam said:

This post is becoming a pane, there is a pattern to it, obscure but its there. 

Buzzzzzzzz......repetition!

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On 02/02/2019 at 14:15, Fly Navy said:

How common is it for glazing on 'modern' NB's (post 2000?) to be double glazed?

 

Secondly, if the chosen NB does not have double glazing, how easy would it be to retro fit DG?

(In a house, it is obviously very easy provided there was enough meat on the cills and frames).

[I don't much fancy the idea of secondary glazing!].

 

There must be significant heat loss on boats with single glazing?

not an issue to retro fit, providing steel around windows fine, We had ours fitting on No Problem about 2 1/2 years ago replacing the windows that were in her since she was build in 2003

 

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