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No more Fuller's beers

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2 hours ago, Athy said:

How much keg beer is sold in modern pubs? I think it's been relegated to places which have a bar but which aren't actually pubs, such as large hotels. The exception is Guinness, which is what I tend to drink in such establishments.

Another exception are so called Sports pubs.  Any pub displayng large Sky Sports banners gets a wide berth from me.  Keg beer and massive TVs blaring out in every corner.

 

I'll go TT first!

 

George

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23 minutes ago, Machpoint005 said:

 

Virtual greenie for that! I suffer from the same problem -- an educated palate!

 

When I visited the National Brewing Museum a couple of years ago, the guide suggested that Doombar was lager with added caramel 😁 (and it was brewed on site in Burton on Trent).

Edited by cuthound
Doombar not it (to clarify)

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48 minutes ago, Machpoint005 said:

 

Virtual greenie for that! I suffer from the same problem -- an educated palate!

Agreed.
I remember Doombar when it was only available in or very close to Cornwall, and then it was a very pleasant pint, now it doesn't seem very different to many other beers.

Had a very interesting trip around The St Austell Brewery last year, and some very nice samples!!

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1 hour ago, Graham Davis said:



Had a very interesting trip around The St Austell Brewery last year, and some very nice samples!!

That's a good tribute.

2 hours ago, furnessvale said:

Another exception are so called Sports pubs.  Any pub displayng large Sky Sports banners gets a wide berth from me. 

Likewise from me - unless they are showing a Test Match which, as I don't drink in the daytime, they rarely are. I might catch the last few overs.

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5 hours ago, Athy said:

Their Abbot Ale still enjoys a high profile, being available in bottles and cans in many supermarkets. Unfortunately I do not enjoy Abbot Ale.

Back in the '70s, the union bar of the college I worked at had proper Abbot ale, cask conditioned in wooden barrels.   I had many a happy night on the Abbot, at least the ones I remember.   Perfectly complimented by a pint of mussels from Tubby  Issacs' stall to eat on the way home.

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4 minutes ago, dor said:

Back in the '70s, the union bar of the college I worked at had proper Abbot ale, cask conditioned in wooden barrels.   I had many a happy night on the Abbot, at least the ones I remember.   

That's when I first encountered it, at the Duncombe Arms in Hertford. I remember, when writing up a pub review for my college paper, mentioning its "swirling strength". As you suggest, as time went by it was the brain, rather than the beer, which swirled.

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7 hours ago, BWM said:

Green ming is a thorn in the side of real ale today, with its corporate attitude and generic beer. A real shame as at one point it was one of few brewers promoting ale drinking. 

Thats one of the reasons I fell out with CAMRA.

 

A number of years ago I went to their 'Great British Beer Festival' at Olympia.

There was a big banner proclaiming the PUB GAMES WERE SPONSORED BY RUDDLES.

 

Now Ruddles County used to be a beer well worth seeking out but GK bought up Ruddles and moved production to Bury St. Edmunds so 'Ruddles' became a 'brand' or, in other words, a beer on wheels.

 

And there was CAMRA taking money from GK at their flagship event.

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I'm glad others share my opinion of Doombar, Abbot and other nationally promoted beers, to which I would add Bombardier and one or two others.  I call them 'cooking beers' and don't include them when giving points in my annual Pub Cruise reports.

 

The debate about 'craft' beer has become pointless, as it is now no more than a marketing bandwagon onto which the large brewers have now jumped, making the term meaningless.

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County used to be a firm favourite of mine. But a while ago - perhps 2 years? - they seem to have changed the recipe, and ity doesn't have that lovely bitter bite any more.

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I used to drive miles to The Dolphin in Betchworth Surrey for a pint of County as it was my nearest Ruddles pub.

 

In my opinion the taste changed in 1999 when the Rutland brewery closed. Ruddles has never tasted the same since.

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14 minutes ago, cuthound said:

In my opinion the taste changed in 1999 when the Rutland brewery closed. Ruddles has never tasted the same since.

Exactly.

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2 hours ago, Mac of Cygnet said:

I'm glad others share my opinion of Doombar, Abbot and other nationally promoted beers, to which I would add Bombardier and one or two others.  I call them 'cooking beers' and don't include them when giving points in my annual Pub Cruise reports.

 

The debate about 'craft' beer has become pointless, as it is now no more than a marketing bandwagon onto which the large brewers have now jumped, making the term meaningless.

Indeed. The last time I was in The Navigation Inn at Stoke Bruerne they were advertising Craft Ale. It turned out to be Marston's Pedigree. That's a beer that used to be a bitter before it became an English Pale Ale and is currently marketed as an Amber Ale. 

 

I had a cracking pint of Abbot in the Dog and Doublet on the Coventry last summer. It took me by suprise. Normally it would be way down my list.

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1 hour ago, cuthound said:

I used to drive miles to The Dolphin in Betchworth Surrey for a pint of County as it was my nearest Ruddles pub.

 

In my opinion the taste changed in 1999 when the Rutland brewery closed. Ruddles has never tasted the same since.

Yes, its been a shadow of itself ever since. Much the same with Youngs, after they moved their brewing to Bedford i believe, but i think Youngs fared better than Ruddles on taste.

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36 minutes ago, BWM said:

Yes, its been a shadow of itself ever since. Much the same with Youngs, after they moved their brewing to Bedford i believe, but i think Youngs fared better than Ruddles on taste.

 

When I used to live in Surrey and work in London, I often drank Youngs. Since they merged with Charles Wells and closed the Ram Brewery I have only had one pint. Their Special Bitter is now a shadow of its former self.

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2 minutes ago, cuthound said:

 

When I used to live in Surrey and work in London, I often drank Youngs. Since they merged with Charles Wells and closed the Ram Brewery I have only had one pint. Their Special Bitter is now a shadow of its former self.

They were experimenting with the ordinary around the time of the move, one of my locals had been asked for feedback on certain batches but with such a distinct taste it wasn't successful in matching the flavour. I think Youngs was one of the most distinctive brewery flavours, throughout the range of beers. Adnams is another with a distinct 'tang', maybe with the exception of Ghost ship.

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13 hours ago, Athy said:

So, your "Not at all" means "Yes". If a "craft beer" can be cooler and livelier than cask beer, that means that you don't think it can be served on draught. This is not so.

I also wonder how the serving temperature is relevant: of course a beer can be cooler if you put it in the fridge or keep it in a cold cellar. If you don't, then it will assume room temperature. his applies to all beers (and any other liquids, come to think of it).

What I meant was that cooler and livlier is nicer to drink than warm and flat but you can't serve cask too cool because it kills the flavour whereas with craft it doesn't and it has more flavour to start with.

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1 hour ago, Cheshire cat said:

Indeed. The last time I was in The Navigation Inn at Stoke Bruerne they were advertising Craft Ale. It turned out to be Marston's Pedigree. That's a beer that used to be a bitter before it became an English Pale Ale and is currently marketed as an Amber Ale. 

 

I had a cracking pint of Abbot in the Dog and Doublet on the Coventry last summer. It took me by suprise. Normally it would be way down my list.

 

There's still a lot to be said for Pedigree, though, in draught form. It's one of the few beers still brewed in Burton unions.

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3 hours ago, Mac of Cygnet said:

The debate about 'craft' beer has become pointless, as it is now no more than a marketing bandwagon onto which the large brewers have now jumped, making the term meaningless.

From what I've seen, the vast majority of craft beer comes from small independents.

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5 minutes ago, Señor Chris said:

whereas with craft it doesn't and it has more flavour to start with.

 

Well, it tends to have an in-your-face trendyNew World hoppiness instead of the well-judged balance between malt and hops we bitter drinkers crave. 

 

...A good example would be Marble's Manchester Bitter.  

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10 hours ago, Señor Chris said:

From what I've seen, the vast majority of craft beer comes from small independents.

They seem to be bought up very quickly the minute they become popular, a good proposition not being fussy like real ales.

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11 hours ago, Machpoint005 said:

 

Well, it tends to have an in-your-face trendyNew World hoppiness instead of the well-judged balance between malt and hops we bitter drinkers crave. 

 

...A good example would be Marble's Manchester Bitter.  

 

Exactly.

 

Makes me wonder if New World hope are significantly cheaper than English traditional such as Fuggles and Goldings.

 

This and the kegs could explain the rush for craft beer.

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20 hours ago, furnessvale said:

.

 

I'll go TT first!

 

George

Steady lad,don't say something you will later regret.

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On 27/01/2019 at 12:26, furnessvale said:

Another exception are so called Sports pubs.  Any pub displayng large Sky Sports banners gets a wide berth from me.  Keg beer and massive TVs blaring out in every corner.

 

I'll go TT first!

 

George

I hope that is Hogs Back TEA (Traditional English Ale)

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