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1 hour ago, Phil Ambrose said:

Ah yes I understand your use of the phrase now. In the world of optics myopia aka short sightedness is accepted to mean the inability to see objects clearly when they are near you, however it is a plus that you have your own magnifying glass if myopic because you can hold tiny things close to your eyes and they are nicely in focus. 

Having spent a good number of years in and around "eye hospitals" and opticians I care not a jot for what people dig up on Wiki, I did also give talks to opticians around the country at the Road Shows that my company put on .

Phil

With respect, I did not "dig up" anything from Wikipaedia. Having worn spectacles for 65 years to correct short sightedness, I am well aware of it's characteristics and changes as one gets older without the need to refer to any reference material on line.

 

 

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19 hours ago, LadyG said:

Specsaver optician in Irvine told me 20 years ago I should buy her glasses. £600 for two pairs.

Next one ten years ago said I had good eyesight for my age, Specsavers again

Last year I went back to Specsavers, apparently my eyesight is pretty good, so in 20 years my eyesight has improved, perhaps.

Strange thing happened to me: Last easter I banged my head on the car tailgate, which cost me my eyesight for about a month or so and a spell in hospital. As the swelling on my brain reduced, back came my eyesight but a little better than before (distance anyway.) I am not in any way recommending this as a procedure, but I find it rather strange that this could happen.

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22 minutes ago, catweasel said:

Strange thing happened to me: Last easter I banged my head on the car tailgate, which cost me my eyesight for about a month or so and a spell in hospital. As the swelling on my brain reduced, back came my eyesight but a little better than before (distance anyway.) I am not in any way recommending this as a procedure, but I find it rather strange that this could happen.

Frightening stuff. Problem of course is we are all different re abilities and health at very differing ages. My old Dad went instantly blind during a stroke whilst driving his car aged ninety. My bro in law aged 47 a fit healthy non smoker who drinks nearly nowt had a stroke last week.

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2 hours ago, David Schweizer said:

With respect, I did not "dig up" anything from Wikipaedia. Having worn spectacles for 65 years to correct short sightedness, I am well aware of it's characteristics and changes as one gets older without the need to refer to any reference material on line.

 

 

David, that comment was not aimed at you but at others quoting Wiki as the source of all knowledge. One thing I have learnt is that not everything you read on the net is true.

I respect you as one of the wiser people here 

Regards, Phil

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38 minutes ago, mrsmelly said:

Frightening stuff. Problem of course is we are all different re abilities and health at very differing ages. My old Dad went instantly blind during a stroke whilst driving his car aged ninety. My bro in law aged 47 a fit healthy non smoker who drinks nearly nowt had a stroke last week.

Sorry to hear that, strokes are horrible things. They tested me for all of that stuff and brain haemorrhages etc. Usual needles into the spine and loads of other tests, brain scans etc (surprised to learn that I have a brain ;) ) Fighting fit again now and avoiding head butting things...

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22 minutes ago, Phil Ambrose said:

David, that comment was not aimed at you but at others quoting Wiki as the source of all knowledge. One thing I have learnt is that not everything you read on the net is true.

I hadn’t been going to respond, but since you’ve raised it again, I did not quote Wikipedia as the source of all knowledge, I just thought it was a handy layman’s explanation of the phenomenon. If we’re going to get into levels of experience, I first learnt the basics of visual perception 50 years ago and have worked in related fields ever since, finishing as Associate Director of a medical research institute. My personal experience is of thirty years of trying to control ocular hypertension with more visits to eye clinics than I care to think about and with the onset of presbyopia since age 45, 25 years ago.

 

It is the case that problems with distance vision tend to ameliorate with age, but that’s a separate matter from declining near sight and the phenomenon of holding stuff further away from the eyes in order to focus on it. Similarly, increasing the level of illumination improves matters as the iris closes and the smaller aperture changes the effective focal length of the lens just as in photography.

 

Rant over. Now can we get back to the issue of reducing the danger of elderly drivers without making swingeing assumptions about their abilities?

Edited by BruceinSanity
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4 hours ago, mrsmelly said:

Most big companys protect their arses by having some form of driving ability test for their employees. As a for instance every driver working for the post office which is a considerable number are given a competence test which they must pass before driving or shortly after taking up employment. I used to undertake these tests when I was a driving instructer with an AA franchise. It consisted of a short forty minutes ish drive and debrief all in all one hour. I passed all but one who then had to undertake lessons with me until I validated him for the Post office. I didnt rip them off he only had two or three hours with me to show him mainly the difference between his little car and a long wheelbase van to stop him going up the footpath exiting junctions!! Advice had to be given to all, re stuff they were rusty on and it wasnt a strict driving test just to put right any inheritant dangerous aspects of their driving. There are around forty thousand driving instructers in the uk who could undertake this task and anyone below parr could be given a legal length of time to come up to scratch. You would be amazed at how bad some people drive but realy most are not that bad and only need a bit of advice. It always amazes me that people who take a very basic driving test aged about 17 then think they can drive for life and need no further training. There are many many driving courses out there to help people improve from the basic level they attained aged 17. People fully expect in many jobs having to undertake refresher courses and further training for life but fail to understand that need when driving a one tonish killing machine, beggars belief realy. Believe it or not there are a hell of a lot of drivers out there that actualy thinks a green traffic light means GO!!!!!! :o

I suppose that we could utilise the additional training that all lorry drivers have to undergo every 5 years making all drivers on the road have to re-qualify for a Certificate of Professional Competence (as per LGV requirements). Of course we'd all then be moaning about having to pay for it I suppose.

 

On the wider picture of elderly drivers, all I was actually proposing was that their medical checks should be carried out by an independent agency of some sort. At the moment you self-certificate that you are fit to drive, and who is going to put their hand up and say that they are not, sadly not very many, whatever their competencies.

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1 hour ago, BruceinSanity said:

I hadn’t been going to respond, but since you’ve raised it again, I did not quote Wikipedia as the source of all knowledge, I just thought it was a handy layman’s explanation of the phenomenon. If we’re going to get into levels of experience, I first learnt the basics of visual perception 50 years ago and have worked in related fields ever since, finishing as Associate Director of a medical research institute. My personal experience is of thirty years of trying to control ocular hypertension with more visits to eye clinics than I care to think about and with the onset of presbyopia since age 45, 25 years ago.

 

It is the case that problems with distance vision tend to ameliorate with age, but that’s a separate matter from declining near sight and the phenomenon of holding stuff further away from the eyes in order to focus on it. Similarly, increasing the level of illumination improves matters as the iris closes and the smaller aperture changes the effective focal length of the lens just as in photography.

 

Rant over. Now can we get back to the issue of reducing the danger of elderly drivers without making swingeing assumptions about their abilities?

Why rant? and who made swinging assumptions about elderly drivers abilities, certainly  not me as at 73 I reckon I am an elderly driver 

Phil 

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10 minutes ago, bizzard said:

Eye have trouble at traffic lights. :(

Thats an easy one. If the top light is iluminated it means stop. If the middle light is iluminated it means stop. The next one is the one that most drivers find hard to understand. If the bottom light is iluminated it means stop unless it is safe to go.

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25 minutes ago, mrsmelly said:

Thats an easy one. If the top light is iluminated it means stop. If the middle light is iluminated it means stop. The next one is the one that most drivers find hard to understand. If the bottom light is iluminated it means stop unless it is safe to go.

When I worked on the railway, many years ago, we had a colourblind minibus driver.  One day he got confused about the order of lights and stopped at a green.  When it changed to red he set off.  The rest of his driving was just as bad.  Always exciting being taken out to a job by old Jack!

 

George

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Not sure if it has a mention, but he is apparently back behind the wheel again already........

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y, and in a doppleganger vehicle, I suppose if he; going to drive it might be best to have the same controls, to minimise rsk of accident :P 

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7 hours ago, mrsmelly said:

Believe it or not there are a hell of a lot of drivers out there that actualy thinks a green traffic light means GO!!!!!! :o

Well that would be a complete waste of Red-and-Amber wouldn't it ...

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1 hour ago, Phil Ambrose said:

Why rant? and who made swinging assumptions about elderly drivers abilities, certainly  not me as at 73 I reckon I am an elderly driver 

Phil 

I am only a year behind you and do not consider myself as an elderly driver, rather an experienced driver

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TV news this morning reporting Philip stopped and police "had words with him" for driving without his seatbelt on.

Phil

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mister was chopping logs yesterday ..well i hope i can still be doing that when i am 90 .and not be banged up in some old peoples home .all on me own in a corner of the room sitting in a chair ..mind you i would rather be driving my 4x4 down some lovely country lane .thats if i was medically fit to ..which i am sure i would be ..the thought of doing that is better then chopping logs innit

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3 hours ago, Phil Ambrose said:

TV news this morning reporting Philip stopped and police "had words with him" for driving without his seatbelt on.

Phil

What happened to the sixty quid and three points then officer????Dereliction of duty???😎😎😎

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6 minutes ago, Ian F B said:

What happened to the sixty quid and three points then officer????Dereliction of duty???😎😎😎

I don't think the police actually caught him without them on, someone reported seeing him without them on and the police went and had a word with him about it.

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13 hours ago, David Schweizer said:

I am only a year behind you and do not consider myself as an elderly driver, rather an experienced driver

Don't worry David, at least you can still remember what age you are, and don't need to claim to be 73 two weeks before your actual 73rd birthday :) . My life experiences tell me an old fool will start as a young fool, and build on his reputation throughout his lifetime.

Edited by LadyG

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They say his Freelanders have bullet proof sides, which is probably why the side wasn't stove in much where the other car struck it, and which would most likely raise its centre of gravity even more which made it roll over more easily.

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1 hour ago, LadyG said:

Don't worry David, at least you can still remember what age you are, and don't need to claim to be 73 two weeks before your actual 73rd birthday. My life experiences tell me an old fool starts as a young fool. 

In a lifetime spanning 26645 days (not including leap years) 14 days is neither here nor there. And it has been said many times it takes one to know one.

Come on Socks, let it go, I have. 😊

Phil

Oh Socks, you could not resist the little edit at the end of your post, for heaven's sake and for your sanity let it go. I have been more than welcoming to you on Thunderboat,  given many of your posts "likes" when they deserved them and yet you come on CWDF and have little digs at me ,for what? what about this then "water under the bridge" and move on  

Phil 😊

Edited by Phil Ambrose

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50 minutes ago, Ian F B said:

What happened to the sixty quid and three points then officer????Dereliction of duty???😎😎😎

You can't get penalty points for driving without a seatbelt.

 

From http://www.saferroads.org/tickets/seatbelt/

 

A. A seatbelt offence currently carries a minimum penalty of £100 fixed penalty fine with no endorsable penalty points. If the case goes to court, this can increase to a maximum fine of £500.

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3 hours ago, alan_fincher said:

You can't get penalty points for driving without a seatbelt.

 

From http://www.saferroads.org/tickets/seatbelt/

 

A. A seatbelt offence currently carries a minimum penalty of £100 fixed penalty fine with no endorsable penalty points. If the case goes to court, this can increase to a maximum fine of £500.

I stand corrected!I get a little humpy cos when I broke down on a dual carriageway,no lines,no restrictions they still fined me!!!😞😞😞😞😞

 

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My favourite "elderly driver" anecdote was about Juan Manuel Fangio, the 5 times motor racing world champion driver.

 

Apparently the Argentinian Minister for Transport wanted to bring in a law banning drivers of 80 years old and over. At that time Fangio was over 80 and thus would be banned.

 

His solution was a challenge the Minister to a race. If Fangio won he could continue to drive, if not the Minister could ban him.

 

The Minister refused the challenge and introduced the new law, but gave Fangio an exemption on the grounds that he was a national hero.

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