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golden_chapati

Rust along water line?

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1 hour ago, David Mack said:


However......

 

CanalPlanAC list 6 boats as built by Jondelin Marine, (including this one), and only one built be by Jondeblin Marine.

(None show as Jondeline Marine, though).

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out of interest .how would you touch the water line up any way if in the water ?? 

impossible if you ask me 

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4 hours ago, Boater Sam said:

Not a well known builder or fitter

London whitewash interior

Thin hull, 6mm base? 5mm sides?

Repair in 2017 to water tank? Why?

Ellis gas boiler, old.

30 years old

No inverter

Odd layout, tiny saloon.

Dear for what it is, southern priced, Its an £18K if good at best

AGREED - I think you can do better

 

VC marine have a good reputation but are very much in business to sell to a particular market - why not head north for your purchase - you are in a tough marketplace but IMHO you will do better outside the M25 - I don't like 6mm/5mm and nor will many insurers.

 

Edited by Halsey

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36 minutes ago, haza said:

out of interest .how would you touch the water line up any way if in the water ?? 

impossible if you ask me 

Load some (filled) water barrels on one side, boat tilts, clean off rust, touch up blacking. 3 or 4 days later when blacking is dry, repeat on the other side.

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52 minutes ago, Halsey said:

AGREED - I think you can do better

 

VC marine have a good reputation but are very much in business to sell to a particular market - why not head north for your purchase - you are in a tough marketplace but IMHO you will do better outside the M25 - I don't like 6mm/5mm and nor will many insurers.

 

Thanks for the advice. I actually live in Liverpool but most of the cheaper boats seem to be 'down south' at the moment, along with the high-profile and larger marinas (VC, Whinton, etc). Maybe that's because they're junk for the London market :rolleyes:

Edited by golden_chapati

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alan you are jesting theres not a one on here ever done that ...but now theres going  to be oh yes i have ..i have  oh and i have ,,well i am having non of it 

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7 minutes ago, haza said:

alan you are jesting theres not a one on here ever done that ...but now theres going  to be oh yes i have ..i have  oh and i have ,,well i am having non of it 

When I moored at Napton a boater at the top of the arm use to heal his boat with a strop across the arm with the boat moored to the opposite bank, that way he could touch up the water line on one side. go out on to the Oxford Canal, turn round and come back to do the other side.

 

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13 minutes ago, haza said:

alan you are jesting theres not a one on here ever done that ...but now theres going  to be oh yes i have ..i have  oh and i have ,,well i am having non of it 

That's One !

 

 

More to come.

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34 minutes ago, haza said:

alan you are jesting theres not a one on here ever done that ...but now theres going  to be oh yes i have ..i have  oh and i have ,,well i am having non of it 

I've not been in dry dock for about 7 years. I just once a year winch the boat well over by the bank with a Spanish windlass tied to a tree and touch up blacking if needed. I also winch up the stern end from an over bridge, again with a Spanish windlass, up enough to inspect its water line there and touch if needed . Keep on dry docking steel boats letting fresh air and oxygen get at the baseplate enhances the rust.

When doing this job with female help I call it Lust at the water line.

Edited by bizzard

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58 minutes ago, haza said:

alan you are jesting theres not a one on here ever done that ...but now theres going  to be oh yes i have ..i have  oh and i have ,,well i am having non of it 

That's two !!

 

More to come ?

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22 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

That's two !!

 

More to come ?

Alan you , Bizzard and I know this fairly standard practice, it ain't rocket science to get a boat to heel over.

Phil

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3 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

Load some (filled) water barrels on one side, boat tilts, clean off rust, touch up blacking. 3 or 4 days later when blacking is dry, repeat on the other side.

Sounds complicated.  Think simpler:

 

4A3FAEF100000578-5509293-image-m-2_15211

  • Greenie 1
  • Haha 1

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5 minutes ago, TheBiscuits said:

Sounds complicated.  Think simpler:

 

4A3FAEF100000578-5509293-image-m-2_15211

Problem is it will take 9 months to do one side, wait for it to refill, arrange a breach again with heel on the starboard side and wait 9 months again.

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Ellis boilers arenow very old. Some spares are available from Foxton Boat Services. If you buy the boat I can let you have a copy of the manual for the boiler. I doubt if you will actually use it with a solid fuel stove in a 45ft boat - we rarely light ours in a 62ft boat.

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8 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

Problem is it will take 9 months to do one side, wait for it to refill, arrange a breach again with heel on the starboard side and wait 9 months again.

I understand CRT are carefully monitoring the new leak on the repaired section.

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alan you bizzard and 1  ..lol yes and  come the day ,, well just come the day 

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We heel boats with a strap over the roof tied to a Merlo loader, it done all the time.

Have even lifted sterns to do rudder tubes and things below water level, carefully!

 

Is this 3?

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17 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

Problem is it will take 9 months to do one side, wait for it to refill, arrange a breach again with heel on the starboard side and wait 9 months again.

Well the blacking should be dry before going back in the water and you would have enough time to put more than two coats on.

  • Happy 1

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On 12/01/2019 at 12:16, golden_chapati said:

Hi all,

 

So my search continues- I've seen a good looking boat which would suit my needs and is within budget, at least on face value. However, I coulnd't help but note the appearance of rust along the waterline. Is this normal? Anything to worry about and a bad sign? Or just means that it needs blacking and give no indication about general hull integrity? 

 

Cheers!

 

How deep are those rust patches? (I'm assuming they're just under the waterline.) 1mm deep? 2mm deep? You probably wouldn't want pitting to be 3mm deep -- more than half the thickness of your hull sides.

 

Have a close look at that 2017 survey and its summary. It should state the surveyor's steel thickness readings at various points around the hull. Many narrowboats of that age and steel spec have been over-plated, and the survey should comment on any over-plating that has been made and/or make any recommendations regarding over-plating.

 

It's important to remember that a steel boat can rust from the inside as well as the outside. Try to look into the bilges/bottom plate in as many places as possible, via floor hatches (often towards the stern ... perhaps under a carpet), under built-in seating, in the backs of closets, under the bow, etc. Wear old clothes and take a good torch. What you don't want to find under there are signs of any extensive rusting. Definitely not large patches of flaking rust. Also, you don't want to find active corrosion around water tanks and loo tanks -- that could have been eating away at the hull sides where leaking water collects. 2mm corrosion on the inside, coinciding with 2.5mm pitting on the outside doesn't leave much metal between you and the canal bottom.

 

Sorry, I don't mean to spook you. Just keep your eyes open buying a 30 year old boat. It looks a nice interior.

 

Best of luck.

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Pitting and rusting are different things? Yea? Caused by different chemical reactions mixing with the steel. One electrics the other oxygen and water. 

 

 

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On 12/01/2019 at 19:11, golden_chapati said:

Thanks for the advice. I actually live in Liverpool but most of the cheaper boats seem to be 'down south' at the moment, along with the high-profile and larger marinas (VC, Whinton, etc). Maybe that's because they're junk for the London market :rolleyes:

Worth trying the brokerage at wincham wharf northwich also most of the marinas in Lancashire/ Cheshire usually have some boats for sale I would try fetters wharf and scarisbrick near you on the L&L. The white bear marina (Bwml) used have a few for sale too. Venetian in Cheshire might be worth a look too.

 

worth visiting and speaking to people as they are more likely to take you seriously and you will get to see the good boats that never make it to being advertised or have just come in. 

Edited by jonathanA

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