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3 hours ago, haggis said:

We used to have a dog which was of a nervous disposition and I used to try to avoid situations which she might find stressful and I was sympathetic when she showed signs of being nervous. I was given advice to change my response to her nervousness and it didn't take long before she stopped being so nervous. All I did was stop avoiding situations she might find stressful and if she showed signs of being stressed, instead of being sympathetic I told her not to be so b****  stupid and then ignored her. It was amazing the change in her behaviour. OK she still occasionally felt nervous but she didn't play on it  and expect me to help her. 

Perhaps worth a try before you change your boat to suit your dog 🙂

 

haggis

She also seemed to prefer to lie above the engine and quiver, rather than finding a quiet spot where she wouldn't be able to keep an eye on us ...

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What breed is the dog? Ours couldn't bear being in the boat when it was moving but was quite happy on the roof where she could see us and what was going on around her. Obviously not practical for larger breeds of dog. I

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4 hours ago, Mac of Cygnet said:

Completely ignore the dog.  Don't fuss over it or try to comfort it or do anything to acknowledge its fear.  This may sound cruel, and may take a while, but dog behavioural psychology says that if you are the pack leader, then your unconcern will communicate itself to the dog.

Spot on. 

 

This is is why none of our dogs have been bothered by fireworks, or the game / clay shooting that have taken place near our last two houses. 

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I remember watching Barbara Woodhouse with a dog that was frightened to go on the railway. The owner couldn't get it on the train. Barbara took it by the lead and when the train stopped and the doors opened the dogs paws almost left the platform as she yanked it onto the train

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1 hour ago, mrsmelly said:

 fit a nice smoooooooth Japanese unit.

Love to,but have you seen the prices! There wouldn't be much change from ten grand,taking into account removing the old engine,new gearbox,engine mountings,and aligning. As my old boat didn't cost much more than that,I can't justify that expense.

The more I think about the cost,the more I learn to love my noisy,smelly,vibrating BMC. 

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16 hours ago, Mad Harold said:

You could try borrowing a friend's dog,(one that isn't afraid of engines ) to keep your dog company for a while,to see if your dog calms down If it works,then get another dog as a pal for yours.

Don't commit sacrilege by getting rid of your Gardner! 

Not a dog but my daughter had similar problems when under way with her Motor home /cat ,no matter what was tried In desperation they took on a rescue older cat who"s owner had passed & the problem was more o less cure overnight the net day journey the"wuss" curled up to the other cat  has been fine ever since

Edited by X Alan W

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Question.

 

What is wrong with the boat?

 

Answer, Nothing.

 

Question.

 

What is wrong?       Answer   THE DOG.     

 

Will He/She lie in the cratch, secured, and be ignored whilst you cruise? Many dog owners use crates where the dog regards it as "home".

Have you tried letting it walk alongside the boat most of the day? It will get back on when its hungry.

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11 hours ago, ditchcrawler said:

I remember watching Barbara Woodhouse with a dog that was frightened to go on the railway. The owner couldn't get it on the train. Barbara took it by the lead and when the train stopped and the doors opened the dogs paws almost left the platform as she yanked it onto the train

Ah, Barbara Woodhouse! Those were the days when dog training was primarily done by dominance. Thank goodness these days have gone

 

haggis

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What happens if you put the dog on the towpath whilst you travel? My guess is that it will follow the boat and get some exercise and perhaps will be happier to join you after a while. Might not work though, our dog gets upset if we put her on the bank and set off on the boat.

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I remember once, waiting to go down the Montgomery (we were early for the lock times) as a boat past, there was a 'disturbance' in the water about 3 feet behind the boat and a 'black-blob' bobbing up and down, so I ran down the tow-path and stopped the boat.

 

It turned out to be their dog which they had on a lead, it had fallen overboard and was being dragged along behind them and no one had noticed.

The dog was totally exhausted and 90% dead.

It did eventually (half-an-hour or so) start to show some signs of life after massaging it, shaking it upside down to get the water out of its lungs and keeping it warm.

By the time we went down the lock the dog appeared to be making a good recovery.

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3 hours ago, Bee said:

What happens if you put the dog on the towpath whilst you travel? My guess is that it will follow the boat and get some exercise and perhaps will be happier to join you after a while. Might not work though, our dog gets upset if we put her on the bank and set off on the boat.

Not easy to pick after your dog if it is on the towpath and you are on a boat in the middle of the canal 🙂 

 

haggis

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3 hours ago, Bee said:

What happens if you put the dog on the towpath whilst you travel? My guess is that it will follow the boat and get some exercise and perhaps will be happier to join you after a while. Might not work though, our dog gets upset if we put her on the bank and set off on the boat.

 

With our first rescue dog, Kim, we spent three days teaching her to get off at a bridge and on at the next one. Finally we thought she had got the hang of it, so wife and dog got off and wife quickly stepped back onto the boat and off we went.

 

We thought the dog would walk alongside the boat and get back on at the next bridge. No, even though she hated water, she leapt into the cut and proceeded to swim after the boat!

 

Never bothered trying to teach the next few dogs to get themselves on and off the boat. 😂

 

 

Edited by cuthound
Clarification

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Just a thought, but might this be a similar issue to one of our dogs being absolutey  scared of going near or traveling in our car.( so how would we get to the boat?) He would always leave the house and pull over to the other side of the garden furthest away from the car  whenever we went out for a walk. 

It 's sorted out now  and he travels fine any where car, boat or train.....

It was in someways the weirdest thing we have had to deal with in all our rescued  dogs, but really the most rewarding.

 

 

 The approach known as "systematic desensitisation"; is to subject the patient(dog) is  to increasing periods of  the stressor for periods shorter than that which would take  it to be  upset.  {Its a completely benign  technique, rather than the Woodhouse "flooding method" and is supposed to be longer lasting!}

 

Right. I'll try to explain the practicalities. We first just sat in the car, in a closed garden, with the doors open and  read the paper/ had a cup of coffee so the dog could wander around suit himself,  eventually he became comfortable getting into the car....

Then the interesting bit comes we had to gradually increase the time we ran the the engine/ moved the car; but by amounts so small that he didn't notice and on NO ACCOUNT LET HIM GET DISTURBED. In this case we could only manage increases of 30seconds each time or so but GRADUALLY   to get to half an hour;  at which point the issue  was resolved!!! ---   I don't know why the turning point is reckoned as half an hour but that is the "magic" time.

 

I hope that makes sense, please ask if I can help more, I have  cut the details rather short keep the post manageable.

I do hope you can get your pet happy on the boat .

 

John

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, cuthound said:

 

With our first rescue dog, Kim, we spent three days teaching her to get off at a bridge and on at the next one. Finally we thought she had got the hang of it, so wife and dog got off and wife quickly stepped back onto the boat and off we went.

 

We thought the dog would walk alongside the boat and get back on at the next bridge. No, even though she hated water, she leapt into the cut and proceeded to swim after the boat!

 

Never bothered trying to teach the next few dogs to get themselves on and off the boat. 😂

 

 

 My wife is a walker, she is not happy if she can't do ten miles or so per day, at home or on the boat.

 

When we first got the dog she took him with her on towpath walks, I'd drop them at a bridge and pick them up in a few miles;  later in the day we would repeat the process.

 

Although fine with this for a year or so, the dog has now caught on and will wait at the 4th or 5th bridge hole and pop onto the front of the boat, leaving the wife to continue alone.

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2 hours ago, frahkn said:

 My wife is a walker, she is not happy if she can't do ten miles or so per day, at home or on the boat.

 

When we first got the dog she took him with her on towpath walks, I'd drop them at a bridge and pick them up in a few miles;  later in the day we would repeat the process.

 

Although fine with this for a year or so, the dog has now caught on and will wait at the 4th or 5th bridge hole and pop onto the front of the boat, leaving the wife to continue alone.

Sounds like a clever dog. He will be shouting "walkies" soon the to strife.

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On 11/01/2019 at 21:14, Iain_S said:

She also seemed to prefer to lie above the engine and quiver, rather than finding a quiet spot where she wouldn't be able to keep an eye on us ...

 

Our late labrador Rosie wpent most of her boating time on the roof, close to the steere and whoever else was about. Seen below as a youngster, and on her last boat trip.

pic008.jpg

pic090.jpg

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HI,

Have you tried a degree of separation so he can live without the engine impacting on his life so much - i.e. good solid doors across the boat corridors to reduce the sound and a cage for the dog - we have just bought a springer rescue pup into our lives and have never used cages before - he absolutely loves it and it clearly provides security as we don't need to shut the door - "Ellie Boo" cages only £30 on Amazon has to be worth a try. 

What he is looking for is security and that's what you have to try to provide don't get too hung up on the engine.

We have had at least 5 dogs with old engines they do get there in the end - I can't remember your layout - does he have a straight corridor to walk past it or does he have to go around the gearbox?? - can you keep him away from it altogether?

I think you have probably made a mistake somewhere in his introduction which you will need to reflect on and slowly undo.

Sadly this will now probably take a lot of time and a lot of patience...……………...but it will be worth it in the end

 

 

IMG_0020.JPG

Edited by Halsey
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9 hours ago, David Mack said:

 

Our late labrador Rosie wpent most of her boating time on the roof, close to the steere and whoever else was about. Seen below as a youngster, and on her last boat trip.

pic008.jpg

pic090.jpg

Is that The Fox and Anchor at Coven??

 

 

THREE happy dogs below "we" can fit on any boat! 40ft cruiser or 60ft trad

 

105-0537_IMG.JPG.5123b297d2209326ac58d2ac8f188c93.JPG087.JPG.87fab7d0d9989f5d7bc9f48a9025b62a.JPG

Edited by Halsey

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1 hour ago, Halsey said:

Is that The Fox and Anchor at Coven??

 

Looks like the "railway mural" at Wolverton on the GU near Milton Keynes in the background. 

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1 hour ago, cuthound said:

 

Looks like the "railway mural" at Wolverton on the GU near Milton Keynes in the background. 

That was my other thought but I thought that was under a bridge? - lets see who is right😉

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2 hours ago, cuthound said:

 

Looks like the "railway mural" at Wolverton on the GU near Milton Keynes in the background. 

Yes, photo was taken at Wolverton.

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2 hours ago, cuthound said:

 

Looks like the "railway mural" at Wolverton on the GU near Milton Keynes in the background. 

It is

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The problem is that who ever put the engine in clearly didnt take tim’s advice and fit proper engine in. Warwickshire flyboats should have a jp in, preferably out of a road roller or winch.

if it had a jp there would be no problem,  you wouldnt notice the dog shaking  and howling because of the noise and vibration.

 

suggest you put the lorry engine back in the scrapyard and get a decent engine.

an ha without a silencer would be equally effective.

 

failing that buy a butty and install, the dog in the back cabin. Probably the cheapest option, and means the lorry engine could do some work.

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On 11/01/2019 at 22:17, MHS said:

Spot on. 

 

This is is why none of our dogs have been bothered by fireworks, or the game / clay shooting that have taken place near our last two houses. 

We didn't think that Syd would be bothered about fireworks as nothing else seems to bother him. But he was a mess the week around bonfire night. We tried to carry on as normal and just ignore him but that technique just didn't really work. Not sure what we will this year!

 

As for the boat luckily he is not bothered about being on that at all even when we are travelling at high speed. He will wander around the decks and on the roof when we are on safer waters. But then happily get back on the helm seat next to Liam when we are on more open or tidal waters.

 

20180624-140255.jpg

 

20181110-100937.jpg

 

20180526-080817.jpg

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