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Trina

Information on history of Guppyanna

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Any information relating to Guppyannas history would be welcome. She was built in 2005 by David Browne and sons. Her original name was Anne B. She was a burnt out shell but 3yrs of restoration has transformed her. More pics in members gallery. Thanks

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  • Greenie 3

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Respect, not many people would take on a job like that.  You were lucky the steelwork didn't distort with the heat.  Nice job ?

 

 

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The steel distorted in the middle on the roof so we cut out the worst bits and welded a new piece in. There are still signs of heat damage around one of the windows but it all adds character and the superstructure is solid as we put plenty of strong bulkheads in to hold it together. 

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Rather a unique hull shape, you wouldn't have any problem picking it out if it was ever stolen.

Presumably designed for an OB ?

 

40 foot is quite large for an OB (10hp ?)

Edited by Alan de Enfield

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30 minutes ago, Trina said:

I'm thinking about engine's now. What would people suggest? 

Well I don't think you have much choice - its going to be a petrol outboard engine. It originally had a 10hp engine so somewhere near the same would be a start.

 

Maybe one of the 'newish' 9.9hp 4-strokes.

Read up on the BSS and petrol storage requirements - petrol is much more dangerous than diesel and is subject to stricter safety rules.

 

You will need to measure the distance from the tope of the 'transom' (the flat plate that the engine mounts on) to the bottom of the Hull - that will determine what leg-length OB you need.

 

 

Transom Leg length.jpg

Edited by Alan de Enfield

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32 minutes ago, Trina said:

I'm thinking about engine's now. What would people suggest? 

I tried to suggest a horse the other night but nobody was having it. :giggles:

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1 minute ago, Trina said:

Would a 10hp be adequate on a river? 

Probably not but it depends on the River and the conditions.

However - with a displacement hull boat (like a NB) it doesn't matter what size engine you have (within limits) the boat will not perform any better.

 

Which river(s) are you thinking of ?

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The river Ouse in York and The Trent

Someone mentioned a good  prop which makes it better for handling and reversing but I've forgotten what it's called. 

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4 minutes ago, Trina said:

The river Ouse in York and The Trent

Someone mentioned a good  prop which makes it better for handling and reversing but I've forgotten what it's called. 

Personally I would not recommend a 40 foot steel NB with an OB on either of those rivers.

 

Narrowboats, even with 'big' diesel engines and big props are not ideal on either of those rivers. They are generally underpowered and if there is much current running you will have some trouble. I have had Narrowboats with a 'biggish' diesel engines and have struggled on the Trent, I know of one or two who have been swept into the dolphins on top of the weirs because they did not have the power to turn across the current to get to the locks.

I very, very nearly had that problem after a bit of rain and there was a 'flow on'- it was a brown-trouser time.

 

The Ouse and York are particularly prone to flooding as the catchment area 'in't hills pours a lot of water into the River.

 

In perfect conditions you should be OK, but be prepared to tie up if the conditions change.

 

Maybe someone with a similar set up will answer the question.

 

I now have a GRP Cruiser which is designed for, and has engines suitable for Tidal river usage.

 

Sorry - It may not be what you want to hear, but if your plans are for River cruising, then it may be better to sell the boat and buy one more suitable for the areas in which you plan to use it.

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6 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

Personally I would not recommend a 40 foot steel NB with an OB on either of those rivers.

I know this might be a stupid question but would it not be possible to use a larger OB, one more than 10hp. I'm sure if there was you would have suggested it so my question is really then why is it not possible or wouldn't work. 

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8 minutes ago, Tumshie said:

I know this might be a stupid question but would it not be possible to use a larger OB, one more than 10hp. I'm sure if there was you would have suggested it so my question is really then why is it not possible or wouldn't work. 

It comes down to the design of the Hull - its called a 'displacement' hull.

This means that it just pushes a wave of water in front of it, if you use a bigger engine you get a little more speed, until the 'wave' in the fron gets to a certain size - you can then put a 1000hp engine in and it would not make an iota of difference. Once it reached design speed it cannot go faster.

A small OB with a small prop (8", or, 9") will not give you the control. steering, or reversing that an inboard engine with a 20" prop will.

 

I'll look and see if I can find the 'scientific' reasons.

 

If you were to watch a displacement vessel move through the water you would notice that they create both a bow wave and a stern wave as they push through the water . The faster the boat goes, the larger these two waves become until at some point they become a single wave. It is at this point that the boat has reached its "hull speed". That means that this is as fast as it can go. It can't go faster because it is caught in this wave. The longer the boat, the faster it can "theoretically" go because it takes longer for the bow and stern wave to become one wave. 

 

Edited by Alan de Enfield
  • Greenie 2

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11 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

I'll look and see if I can find the 'scientific' reasons.

Don't go out of your way to look for more, I knew there had to be some reason and Im grateful you took the time to explain - Thank you. :)

 

ETA that's really interesting. :D

Edited by Tumshie

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Thankyou for your advice. It's really useful. If I added 10ft to the stern and put a diesel engine in. Would this be better?

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7 minutes ago, Trina said:

Thankyou for your advice. It's really useful. If I added 10ft to the stern and put a diesel engine in. Would this be better?

Yes.

 

An expensive way of doing it, but you obviously have the skills for metal working.

It will still be a NB and will still need care in navigating rivers.

 

I have had 18 boats over the last 30 years of which 6 or 7 have been NBs, currently I have two boats - a GRP Cruiser based at Newark (on the River Trent), and an ocean-going  cruising catamaran based at Plymouth.

Just as a comparison - I sailed about 4000 miles last year (on the open Sea) and I am far more 'aware' of the dangers, and more apprehensive on the Trent or Humber with my Cruiser that I am 50 miles out at Sea with no land in sight.

Edited by Alan de Enfield

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9 minutes ago, Trina said:

Thankyou for your advice. It's really useful. If I added 10ft to the stern and put a diesel engine in. Would this be better?

 

3 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

Yes.

Yey - I'm glad there's hope, I was getting a bit worried for you there.  

 

I'm going to bow out now, but it was nice chatting, Trina, and I hope you'll become a regular with us. ?

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2 hours ago, Trina said:

Thankyou for your advice. It's really useful. If I added 10ft to the stern and put a diesel engine in. Would this be better?

 

Yes better, but I'm finding the bow shape every bit as worrying as the stern, from the partial photo in your first post. It looks from the photo as though there is not a conventional 'pointy' bit at the front like most narrowboats. Or is there? It looks square-fronted to me. 

 

It's hard to imagine a hull less suitable than this for a river with the reputation of the Trent, unless that photo is misleading. 

 

Excellent renovation you've done.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Mike the Boilerman

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1 minute ago, Trina said:

Hi yes the bow is flat. I might need to think about welding a pointy bit on it. Thanks? 

 

I think there is a better term for it than 'pointy bit', but I'm damned if I can think what it is.

 

And yes, weld one on if you can!

 

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1 minute ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

I think there is a better term for it than 'pointy bit', but I'm damned if I can think what it is.

It's called its Snout. ?

  • Greenie 1

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