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Geoff_777

Stiff lock gates and paddles

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9 hours ago, TheBiscuits said:

Probably it was a gallon in those days :D

 

It came in pints ,quarts, & gallons +5 &10gallon drums & 25& 40 g allon   barrel IIRC it was 1/6£ sd in 67/8 per pimt fo Q 20/50 super shade of green when unused Paul Wallace B&M was on a proposed Duckams run from E port to Aldridge when his loaded boat "Yeoford"rolled over the tank design left the CofG to high tanks were redesigned but the traffic never got properly going Duckhams were the first company to introduce ring pull disposable cans in the UK at that time most oils came in refillable bottles stored in crates similar to milk

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I think metric sizes for a lot of goods were introduced around the early 1970s. The way I vaguely remember it, both Wilson and Heath were in favour of it.

By the time I briefly worked on garage forecourts in the autumn of 1976, I'm sure oil was all in metric size cans; most of what we sold was the small size, 500ml was it?

I remember BP brought out VF7 oil at that time and we were told to push sales of it, but your average South London motorist was rather suspicious of it and it didn't sell well. Something about it being a bit thinner than other oils, so only suitable for certain engines?

 

Maybe because a lot of my boating is on the busier canals such as the GU and Oxford, paddles I come across seem to more often suffer from too much grease rather than too little. As Alan Fincher said, there's a lot of variation in how stiff gates and paddles are, and it certainly helps to have someone strong on a crew to deal with the awkward ones. Earlier this year when I was recovering from an operation I had to dodge the heavier work for a while, and came to appreciate this more.

 

 

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4 hours ago, Peter X said:

I think metric sizes for a lot of goods were introduced around the early 1970s. The way I vaguely remember it, both Wilson and Heath were in favour of it.

By the time I briefly worked on garage forecourts in the autumn of 1976, I'm sure oil was all in metric size cans; most of what we sold was the small size, 500ml was it?

I remember BP brought out VF7 oil at that time and we were told to push sales of it, but your average South London motorist was rather suspicious of it and it didn't sell well. Something about it being a bit thinner than other oils, so only suitable for certain engines?

 

Maybe because a lot of my boating is on the busier canals such as the GU and Oxford, paddles I come across seem to more often suffer from too much grease rather than too little. As Alan Fincher said, there's a lot of variation in how stiff gates and paddles are, and it certainly helps to have someone strong on a crew to deal with the awkward ones. Earlier this year when I was recovering from an operation I had to dodge the heavier work for a while, and came to appreciate this more.

 

 

I thought BP's top of the line offering around that time  was Viscostatic. & their std  stuff Energol IIRC the metric came in some 6months after the money changed around the pint beer glasses had the etched line around them some 1/2inch from the top to conform with the 500ML in the local pub the regulars still had them filled to the top & paid a few pence extra

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