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SteveBishop

What have you read lately

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Inspired by a comment  during a conversation yesterday evening and the fact that the night are drawing in.

I am a new member so don't want to appear to eager. But I cant find anywhere on this forum to discuss what you are  currently reading, want to read, or just wish you hadn't  bothered opening the first page. Personally I will read almost anything, I am eagerly awaiting the new Lee Child, Jack Reacher, they never let me down. Robert white has an interesting series The Fix, The fire and a couple of other theme SAS man turns contract killer in Manchester  good story but his lead character Rick Fuller spends to much time shopping for  designer labels.

A very English Scandal , was a bit near the knuckle. Lots of buggering about "quite literally". does anyone have a favourite they want to recommend and would anyone be interested in forming a reading circle where we can exchange or swap books for discussion. 

The floor is open.

reading books.jpg

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Started reading "Narrow Dog to Carcasson" about 8 years ago. I can only read one sentence at a time before I get annoyed with Terry Darlington's writing style and give up. :ninja:

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I gave up reading books when I found this forum.The last book I read was Ransome "We didn't mean to go to sea" No, I tell a lie, it was "NANO Moth" by a bunch of nutters!

Edited by rusty69

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Scouring a charity shop for something worth reading a couple of weeks ago, I chanced upon a Colin Dexter novel, one of his Morse series. I had not read any Dexter before. Suffice to say, last week I went back and bought the other four which they had in stock.

 

I have now started a massive tome called 'Twelve Children Of Paris' by one Tim Willocks. After 100 or so of its 700+ pages, I'm wondering how anyone can still be alive by the end, so copious and vicious is the body count. Mr. Pillocks writes with some style but he must have a very warped mind. But I'm persevering, so I won't yet say that Willocks writes boll...

 

Oh, between times I've read Heather Augustyn's history of Alpha Boys' School in Jamaica, most informative..

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I also read Lee Child.   I enjoy Bernard Cornwell but am currently in the middle of a Wilbur Smith.

 

I am in a similar position to Ray T with regard to "Narrow Dog to Carcasson".

 

Most of my books are either charity shop or from the book sale part of the library down the road from my eldest daughter.  (Basically same as a charity shop the library was due to close and is now run by volunteers).

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Ray T said:

Started reading "Narrow Dog to Carcasson" about 8 years ago. I can only read one sentence at a time before I get annoyed with Terry Darlington's writing style and give up. :ninja:

I haven't started his series yet I have 'Narrowdog to Wigan Pier' and was saving it till I get time to sit down and really indulge - now I'm beginning to worry. :o

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I've read 'Narrow Dog' a couple of times, with the result that I can now spell Carcassonne. I found it gripping, funny and moving. Mr. Darlington is not a professional writer, but I enjoyed his across-the-kitchen-table style.

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2 minutes ago, Athy said:

 I can now spell Carcassonne. 

Which shows how little I have managed to read so far  :D

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9 minutes ago, Athy said:

I've read 'Narrow Dog' a couple of times, with the result that I can now spell Carcassonne. I found it gripping, funny and moving. Mr. Darlington is not a professional writer, but I enjoyed his across-the-kitchen-table style.

I think you can be a not professional writer if you can spin a warm and anecdotal style. But I like some think that moves along well and allows me to create a good picture in my head while I'm reading. I don't care what the genre so long as it can do that. 😊

Edited by Tumshie
can't spell nuhing

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4 minutes ago, Jerra said:

Which shows how little I have managed to read so far  :D

....as in that signboard which reads Think ahea

3 minutes ago, Tumshie said:

I think you can be a not professional writer if you can spin a worm and anecdotal style. But I like some think that moves along well and allows me to create a good picture in my head while I'm reading. 😊

I now have a picture of a spinning worm in my head.

Edited by Athy

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We picked up a copy of Narrowdog to that French place at the book swap bog pumpout at Gayton Jct last year. Lovely hardback version. I am ashamed to say I haven't read it yet, although I read a previous copy.

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3 minutes ago, Tumshie said:

I think you can be a not professional writer if you can spin a worm and anecdotal style. But I like some think that moves along well and allows me to create a good picture in my head while I'm reading. 😊

Hi again,, it seems your idea has wings 

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1 minute ago, SteveBishop said:

Hi again,, it seems your idea has wings 

It wasn't my idea. You just wanted me to think was - :lol:

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Just now, SteveBishop said:

Back later the nose bag has arrived 

Enjoy. 

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This Is Going To Hurt by Adam Kay which was funny and painful in equal measure.

 

Outliers by Malcolm Caldwell, thoroughly interesting.

 

Runaway by Peter May, which was the first fiction I've read in a long time, and made it to the end without struggling to get motivated to pick it back up.

 

Currently half way through The Ten Types of Human by Dexter Dias, which is quite fascinating so far.

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3 minutes ago, Rumsky said:

This Is Going To Hurt by Adam Kay which was funny and painful in equal measure.

 

Outliers by Malcolm Caldwell, thoroughly interesting.

 

Runaway by Peter May, which was the first fiction I've read in a long time, and made it to the end without struggling to get motivated to pick it back up.

 

Currently half way through The Ten Types of Human by Dexter Dias, which is quite fascinating so far.

You've read five of them, then?

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9 minutes ago, Athy said:

You've read five of them, then?

No idea. Maths was never my strong point, something to do with the failure of the education system.

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1 minute ago, Rumsky said:

No idea. Maths was never my strong point, something to do with the failure of the education system.

:clapping::clapping:

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14 minutes ago, Athy said:

You've read five of them, then?

Five on a Treasure Island (1942)

Five Go Adventuring Again (1943)

Five Run Away Together (1944)

Five Go to Smuggler's Top (1945)

Five Go Off in a Caravan (1946)

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A quick check of my KOBO stats tells my that my clear winning, most read author this year is Lindsay Buroker, but that's no surprise to me as she is one of my favourits.  She's SteamPunk and Sci fi.

 

And I swear I spend my life waiting for Ben Aaronovitch's next Rivers of London book - he just can not write fast enough for me. 

 

I started Marie Browne's Narrow Margins (the first in her series) but then my KOBO died and I haven't picked them up again since I got my new one.

 

Up next on the reading list is Rachel Aaron's Eli Monpress series. Which is about 8 books so that should keep me out of mischief - mostly :giggles:

 

 

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Just now, Tumshie said:

 

 

And I swear I spend my life waiting for Ben Aaronovitch's next Rivers of London book - he just can not write fast enough for me. 

 

 

 

 

For a couple of years early in this decade I felt the same about Bill Bryson's books - great travel books and great travel companions.

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3 minutes ago, Tumshie said:

but then my KOBO died

You had a pet antelope! Impressive, did you manage to get a replacement?

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