Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
pearley

Adding a Cleat/Bollard to the gunwhales

Featured Posts

Although we generally cruise constantly there are times when we put the boat into a marina. Now, whilst a full length pontoon is preferable many of them have pontoons of around 35/40 feet. Using the bow rope means the front of the boat swings about a bit in the wind so I usually put a loop of rope around a mushroom vent that aligns with the end if the pontoon. However, if the wind is blowing hard from the wrong/right direction the boat can roll a bit. If someone walks along the main pontoon it causes the fingers to move up and down thus causing the boat to move and the mooring rope to creak. 

 

So, ideally some sort of ring or Cleat fixed to the gunwhales. I assume the top of the gunwhales is the same thickness steel as the sides of the hill, 6mm? So could be drilled and tapped except there isn't really enough room to turn the tap handle before it fouls the cabin sides. So it would have to be a first or taper tap and a spanner. 

 

Any thoughts? Would 4 X M6 bolts in 6mm steel be OK or is there not enough meat to securely hold the ring. Getting to the underside of the gunwhales is not an option. 

15334_450_450.jpg

Stainless-Steel-Diamond-Eye-Plate-With-Ring-480x480.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like an easy way to create 2 trip hazards. Also, without proper support/strengthening its bound to be an issue; and you'd need access to the other side of the gunwhale to put nuts on (either normal ones, or weld some fixed ones in. While you're there you may as well do a strengthening plate.

Edited by Paul C

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On a previous boat we had a T cleat on the gunwhale and a fairlead on the handrail. Sometimes we used the cleat, sometimes the centre rope through the fairlead all depends on the situation at the time. Never tripped on the cleat as I knew it was there......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would go for 8mm bolts.

Taps have a square section end so obviously designed for an adjustable spanner.

When you walk down the gunnel you will trip over this cleat and fall into the water.

 

6mm and below is for cosmetic things and electronics.

8mm and above is engineering.

 

.............Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have two hefty brass ones set back at the sides of the boat just where the pointy bit starts, these are ideal for secondary mooring but I wouldnt put an anchor on them for that I use the dedicated anchor point. They come with a heavy threaded centre bolt which has a large nut and washer retaining it in what is often the front gas locker. I wouldnt put anything further back on the gunwhales even though I praticaly never go down the gunwhales they would be a trip hazard. I also have a central cleat welded on the roof handy to tie to another boat if rafted up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have a couple of T-studs fitted on the gunnel at the rear of the bow cockpit. They work really well and are bolted through the steel gunnel. Excellent when mooring on bollards/rings that are awkwardly spaced. They are not a trip hazard, as I know exactly where they are!

 

We got them from Midland, though I’m sure they didn’t cost us as much as the now are. 

https://www.midlandchandlers.co.uk/store/product/ab-077.aspx

 

ive found a photo here of when we were out for blacking earlier this year. 

83360423-F8DD-4C44-852D-04A427AEE0E2.png

Edited by MHS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, MHS said:

We have a couple of T-studs fitted on the gunnel at the rear of the bow cockpit. They work really well and are bolted through the steel gunnel. Excellent when mooring on bollards/rings that are awkwardly spaced. They are not a trip hazard, as I know exactly where they are!

 

We got them from Midland, though I’m sure they didn’t cost us as much as the now are. 

https://www.midlandchandlers.co.uk/store/product/ab-077.aspx

 

ive found a photo here of when we were out for blacking earlier this year. 

83360423-F8DD-4C44-852D-04A427AEE0E2.png

Just below your T stud you have a fender eye. I have had some robust ones of these made that I have not got round to fitting yet, I probably never will as tie off points along the hull.

They are about 2" dia pipe made into cups, with a steel rod set through near the face so they look like your fender eye, set back 6mm from that face is a flat square of 5mm plate. The idea is to cut a 2" hole in the side of the hull and put the cup in from the inside and screw it to the inside of the hull.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, jake_crew said:

Have you got a ring in the centre of the roof ? 

 

Useful for this requirement of yours as well as general boating.

Yes we do have a centre rope but that means the rope being led forward to the end Cleat on the pontoon by about 15 ft and as the pivot point is well above the pontoon the boat will still roll move from side to side in high winds. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I fitted a pair of these to the forward ends of my tug deck, I do a bit of towing from time to time and these are invaluable, as well as mooring on a river where you can't have too many lashing points.

M6 stainless fastenings drilled and tapped straight into the steelwork, plenty strong enough.  Try not to use any kind of spanner to turn the tap as this will place uneven stresses which could lead to breakage.  Ratchet type tap wrenches are available and are a much better option.  If painting use white paint.

 

 

IMG_0281.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just put 2 stainless steel D shackels on these might be a better option for you 

IMG_3524.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, ditchcrawler said:

Just below your T stud you have a fender eye. I have had some robust ones of these made that I have not got round to fitting yet, I probably never will as tie off points along the hull.

The fender eye is actually about 2’ further aft than the T-stud. It wouldn’t be strong enough to use as a mooring point, and  I didn’t consider upgrading it. That is an interesting option. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I fitted these earlier this year, worked very well. They fold flat when in use, and below the level of the lip. I've not tripped over them yet.

They do require access underneath though, to attach the bolts.  Force4 chandlery do them, these are the 8" ones.

 

I am on a pontoon about half the length of the boat, I use this line (going backwards) and a long line from the stern to the end of the pontoon, and a loose centre line (just in case of failure of the others - normally it doesn't do anything). The prevailing wind is in a helpful direction

 

20180628_175422.jpg

Edited by Scholar Gypsy
Incompetence

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I loop the long line going back to the pontoon through the handle of a 5L water container. It keeps tension in the rope and keeps it off the gunwhale. Less danger of the rope rolling under feet too.

 

A Waitrose water bottle shows that you are refined. Scuzzier brands are available.

  • Greenie 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

canal-narrowboat.jpg.d60a2be2589819ab456e4fff19df5a3d.jpg

Peter le Marchant Trust use one, I allways found it really useful when mooring as you can take a spring from the bow without having a trip hazard for passengers getting on and off the boat. 

Edited by NickF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Onewheeler said:

I loop the long line going back to the pontoon through the handle of a 5L water container. It keeps tension in the rope and keeps it off the gunwhale. Less danger of the rope rolling under feet too.

 

A Waitrose water bottle shows that you are refined. Scuzzier brands are available.

Good tip, I'll remember that.  Mine'll be the scuzzier brand....

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, NickF said:

canal-narrowboat.jpg.d60a2be2589819ab456e4fff19df5a3d.jpg

Peter le Marchant Trust use one, I allways found it really useful when mooring as you can take a spring from the bow without having a trip hazard for passengers getting on and off the boat. 

I don't think I would look at to a boat that uses tyres as fenders while going through locks for sensible ideas for moorings, but I have lost the thread a bit as to what they are using?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

I don't think I would look at to a boat that uses tyres as fenders while going through locks for sensible ideas for moorings, but I have lost the thread a bit as to what they are using?

I do agree about the tyres .. but the cleat was useful!

 

(I don't think she had the tyre fenders when I was a volunteer skipper but that was a long time ago!) (1980 to 1990 at a guess)

Edited by NickF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.