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Railway sleepers

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2 hours ago, bizzard said:

Wooden sleepers were generally pressure impregnated with creosote.   There was a certain wood used for sleepers in deep cuttings liable to flooding that don't float in case the track tried to shift, but I can't remember what it was.

I can't imagine even softwood sleepers floating anywhere when fitted with chairs/baseplates and rails.

 

George

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10 minutes ago, rasputin said:

strange that I didn't know that definition,

 

when looking up definitions it would seen that larch is an evergreen..lol

 

I always refer to birch as a soft hardwood. 

 

It was a difficult tree to fell, in a confined space having no idea of its characteristics. It was nice to get back to the security of the pines 

 

when looking 

I haven't checked this list for accuracy 

 

Pinaceae:


Larix (larches; 13 species)

Larix decidua (European Larch)

 

Larix sibirica (Siberian Larch)

 

Larix gmelinii (Dauhurian Larch)

 

Larix kaempferi (Japanese Larch)

 

Larix principis-rupprechtii (Prince Rupprecht's Larch)

 

Larix himalaica (Langtang Larch)

 

Larix griffithii (Himalayan Larch)

 

Larix kongboensis (Kongbo Larch)

 

Larix potaninii (Potanin's Larch)

 

Larix mastersiana (Masters' Larch)

 

Larix lyallii (Subalpine Larch)

 

Larix occidentalis (Western Larch)

 

Larix laricina (Tamarack Larch)

Pseudolarix amabilis (Golden Larch)

Cupressaceae:


Taxodium (baldcypresses; 2 species deciduous, a third evergreen)

Taxodium distichum (Bald Cypress)

 

Taxodium ascendens (Pond Cypress)

Metasequoia glyptostroboides (Dawn Redwood)

Glyptostrobus pensilis (Chinese Swamp Sypress)

Ginkgoaceae:

Ginkgo biloba (Ginkgo; not really a conifer)

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A common timber for sleepers, and Way Beams (the longitudinal timbers on bridges as mentioned earlier) is Green Heart.

 

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1 minute ago, Gejay said:

A common timber for sleepers, and Way Beams (the longitudinal timbers on bridges as mentioned earlier) is Green Heart.

 

I think that is another of the woods which doesn't float.   Isn't it?

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Yes, very dense and if you get a splinter  it almost always turns septic..

Its very difficult to machine as well, blunts a lot of 'normal' wood working tools.

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1 hour ago, rasputin said:

strange that I didn't know that definition,

 

when looking up definitions it would seen that larch is an evergreen..lol

 

 

 

Larch is of course not an evergreen.  There are several conifers that are not evergreen (TM has listed some)  and many evergreens which are not conifers.  'Hardwood' and 'softwood' are timber terms only loosely related to the botanical conifer/ evergreen/ deciduous definitions.

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1 hour ago, Dr Bob said:

They tried to make railway sleepers out of recycled plastic (HDPE) but it didnt work!?

FFU. Sounds terribly impolite but trials so far suggest it will be successful. Recycled plastic is in use on light railways.

 

JP

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16 minutes ago, Captain Pegg said:

FFU. Sounds terribly impolite but trials so far suggest it will be successful. Recycled plastic is in use on light railways.

 

JP

Too much creep! .......in the plastic. 

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In Turkey 10 years ago the railway track running alongside the River Yfrat (headwaters of the Euphrates) was being renewed.  All the timber sleepers had been thrown down the steep bank of the river, ready to be washed away on the first snow-melt flood.   So if you happen to be boating in the river in Basra and get hit by a log - you know where it came from.

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15 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

 

 

I was lucky enough to pick up a few brand new (untreated) Mahogany sleepers a few years back - don't know what they were doing being used as sleepers but they didn't half knock my chain saw about. Beautiful wood, 9 foot long x 11" x 9" (from memory)

 

 

They won't be Mahogany but will be Yarra, which is a very hard eucalyptus from Australia

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7 minutes ago, captain birdseye said:

They won't be Mahogany but will be Yarra, which is a very hard eucalyptus from Australia

Yes but it is it this hard?....

 

 

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23 hours ago, Captain Pegg said:

FFU. Sounds terribly impolite but trials so far suggest it will be successful. Recycled plastic is in use on light railways.

 

JP

Not just light rail, Network Rail have been using plastic sleepers for the last nine years, As have other countrys railways. The Ffestiniog and Welsh Highland railways have also been relaying with plastic sleepers some of their englnes weigh 62 tons.  

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14 minutes ago, nbfiresprite said:

Not just light rail, Network Rail have been using plastic sleepers for the last nine years, As have other countrys railways. The Ffestiniog and Welsh Highland railways have also been relaying with plastic sleepers some of their englnes weigh 62 tons.  

Plastic sleepers are not in normal usage on the national rail network.

 

I did a shift on the cob at Porthmadog about five years ago installing recycled plastic sleepers on a winter's day of severe winds and tidal flooding. In the words of Jones the Steam it was jumping cold.

 

JP

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Wooden sleepers are still used in certain instances, like certain over bridges and such to soften the vibration, and some stations and terminus stations for quieter running. Perhaps its those that plastic sleepers might replace.

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26 minutes ago, Captain Pegg said:

Plastic sleepers are not in normal usage on the national rail network.

 

I did a shift on the cob at Porthmadog about five years ago installing recycled plastic sleepers on a winter's day of severe winds and tidal flooding. In the words of Jones the Steam it was jumping cold.

 

JP

You better tell Network Rail then, as there are stacks of them in Whitemoor Yard being delivered and loaded onto trains wor weekend work.

 

 

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/road-and-rail-transport/5274149/Network-Rail-to-replace-wooden-sleepers-with-recycled-plastic.html

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If they are creosote impregnated, the creosote never appears to stop leaching out!

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On 08/10/2018 at 20:46, tree monkey said:

I haven't checked this list for accuracy 

 

Pinaceae:


Larix (larches; 13 species)

Larix decidua (European Larch)

 

Larix sibirica (Siberian Larch)

 

Larix gmelinii (Dauhurian Larch)

 

Larix kaempferi (Japanese Larch)

 

Larix principis-rupprechtii (Prince Rupprecht's Larch)

 

Larix himalaica (Langtang Larch)

 

Larix griffithii (Himalayan Larch)

 

Larix kongboensis (Kongbo Larch)

 

Larix potaninii (Potanin's Larch)

 

Larix mastersiana (Masters' Larch)

 

Larix lyallii (Subalpine Larch)

 

Larix occidentalis (Western Larch)

 

Larix laricina (Tamarack Larch)

Pseudolarix amabilis (Golden Larch)

Cupressaceae:


Taxodium (baldcypresses; 2 species deciduous, a third evergreen)

Taxodium distichum (Bald Cypress)

 

Taxodium ascendens (Pond Cypress)

Metasequoia glyptostroboides (Dawn Redwood)

Glyptostrobus pensilis (Chinese Swamp Sypress)

Ginkgoaceae:

Ginkgo biloba (Ginkgo; not really a conifer)

But which one is "Number 1"?

(MP reference for the under 50s).

  • Greenie 1

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7 hours ago, nbfiresprite said:

You better tell Network Rail then, as there are stacks of them in Whitemoor Yard being delivered and loaded onto trains wor weekend work.

 

 

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/road-and-rail-transport/5274149/Network-Rail-to-replace-wooden-sleepers-with-recycled-plastic.html

 

 I have no need to do that.

 

See Dr Bob's comments above. What was an aspiration in 2009 remains so today. Synthetic sleepers are still only used on a trial basis. The stacks of sleepers you see being delivered to Whitemoor Yard for track replacement work will be steel or hardwood. Concrete sleepers will arrive already loaded onto rail wagons in far greater numbers.

 

JP

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