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Mike the Boilerman

Flu jabs

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Now it is the time of year that people of a certain age started getting nagged ragged by our 'healthcare professionals' to have a 'flu jab', whatever that is exactly. I've never been clear about what this is for despite asking on the odd occasion, but I'm sure some here will know.

 

Firstly, I don't really understand the difference between colds and 'flu. Secondly, I don't suffer much from colds anyway and once someone suggested to me the 'flu jab was to prevent 'flu spreading as I could carry it without getting symptoms so getting jabbed is the socially responsible thing to do even when you don't need it yourself. Is this true?

 

Thirdly, I suspect the real reason the chemist, the GP, the practice nurse etc etc are all dead keen for me to get a 'flu jab is because they get paid handsomely for selling me one. IS this true?

 

And fourthly, there are persistent rumours that you feel like shyte for a week or so after having one. Is this real or is it a 'reverse placebo' effect where peeps expect to get flu symptoms after having it, so they do? 

 

 

 

Oh and fifthly, if the jab only stops you getting 'flu, presumably it makes no difference to catching colds. And is there such a thing as 'mild 'flu' which might be confused with a cold?   

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My (limited!) understanding is that it is formulated to protect you from the strains of flu they think people are most likely to succumb to in that particular winter.

The pattern of flu variants is constantly evolving, so there can never be a vaccine that guarantees you won't get flu, but the chances are massively reduced.

 

Some strains of flu are pretty nasty, and obviously lots of people die from it each winter, although they are clearly people already weaker and more vulnerable than many of us believe we are.

 

I had the inoculation last winter for the first time, and felt absolutely no ill effects whatsoever.  I didn't get flu, but then most winters I don't get flu.

Flu and colds are different things, and it will do nothing at all to reduce your chances of getting a cold, (or indeed "man flu"!).

 

 

 

 

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Flu and colds are completely different things although most people say they have flu when its just a bad cold. From my experience when i have had the shot is no bad feeling after, i also noticed that i never got a cold either, just coincidence i guess. Your 3rd point is bang on i think. 

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Just now, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

What's the difference then?

 

 

Real flu is much worse, no snotty nose and sneezing. It makes your muscles feel like you just pulled your boat about 10 miles with a rope.

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16 minutes ago, alan_fincher said:



Flu and colds are different things,

 

 

 

If you have ever had flu you will know that colds and flu are nothing like one another. With a cold, you may feel a bit rough but you can carry on functioning but with flu, you are laid really low and are fit to do very little. Also flu hits you quickly. One minute you are sitting there feeling fine and the next you feel like s*** as you have flu. I get the flu jab every year (no after effects) but in late December I took flu. If I managed to be out of bed for one hour out of 24 I was doing well. I couldn't eat for over a week and I just felt so ill. It took weeks before I felt I was back to full strength.  I had often wondered what the difference was between colds and flu. Now I know! 

 

haggis

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Was invited to the surgery to have a pneumonia jab. No side effects. Haven't had the flu jab. Haven't had the pianos-falling-on-the-head jab, or walking in front of a bus jab either.

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Flu is a virus and therefore can be treated by inoculation.  As previously stated the global medical establishment study the virus mutations that constantly occur and then 'brew' a vaccine to protect against the latest strains they think will most prominent.  Sometimes they get it wrong but normally it works.

 

Colds cannot be treated by vaccines or anti-biotics.  If a cold eventually does create a chest infection, usually after a couple of weeks you may then need anti-bitics for the chest infection.

 

I'm not fully up with the rules but If you are young, over 60, in an at risk group such as heart/chest patients, cares/nurses you are offered the jab on the NHS.  If a pharmacist gives the free jab they will get a fee for doing the job.  In the same way they get a fee for doing a 'Medcines review' so if cash flow is low the word goes out to the shops to stir the flujab/review pot..

 

If you have really had flu you would know how bad it was.  When I had I remember sneezing and the shudder made me evacuate my bowels at the same time..

 

apply the £20 note on the floor test - if you pick it up you have a cold - if you leave it where it isyou have flu

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I thought that a principal difference was that flu gives you a raised temperature, so that you feel feverish, whereas a cold simply makes you feel blooming miserable but temperate.

 

Is "man flu" a further variant, or simply an excuse for men to feel sorry for themselves and get out of doing the washing-up and mowing the lawn?

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I have had two flue jabs (now avoid them). Both caused pain around the site lasting for several days and feeling less than bright eyed and bushy tailed for a day or so. At the last one the nurse bounced me into having a pneumonia jab without time to consider the implications. If I had had time I think I would have refused on the grounds pneumonia is a faster way to go than cancer or dementia so may be welcomed. I don't like the way health care is going. Demands that you attend the doctor's for things like flue jabs & annual health checks that do not check for likely problems and the need to self diagnose the urgency of your problem if you want an appointment any-time soon.

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13 minutes ago, Athy said:

I thought that a principal difference was that flu gives you a raised temperature, so that you feel feverish, whereas a cold simply makes you feel blooming miserable but temperate.

 

Is "man flu" a further variant, or simply an excuse for men to feel sorry for themselves and get out of doing the washing-up and mowing the lawn?

Proper flu makes you feel like a Woodpecker with a migraine.

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I've only had flu once in my life and was unable to do anything for about four days,  other than a trip to the loo and  chicken soup. I get the jab annually [free] as an oap with asthma symptoms. Never had any problem. Needs to be updated annually as the virus strains shift every year.

Last year I got vaccinated against shingles, I don't like certain types of pain, this one is avoidable :)

Previous year I got tetanus after an angry garden fork attacked me.

When I get a cold [the thing that needs a few packets of Lemsip], I get it bad, usually three packs  of high power Lemsip capsules,  a thing for squirting up your nose, and three packs of tissues with balsam. I try to avoid social gatherings when "everyone" is "down with a cold"

Not sure about pneumonia, as anything related to my air intake can be absolutely horrific.

I  have found that Nicola [Sturgeon's] health service is starting to fall apart, now waited over six months for something listed as "urgent", somewhere along the line my symptoms have been re-assessed, there is no estimate when this investigation will take place.

 Apparently the NHS is chronically short staffed, not sure why really, twenty years ago an X-ray took a lot more time to prepare, and involved 1960's technology, now its a quick zoom and fast results, operations take less time,   blood testing machines are available, results could be available almost in minutes etc etc.

Edited by LadyG

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1 hour ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

What's the difference then?

 

 

If there is a fifty pound note laying on the towpath outside your boat, if you can be bothered to go and get it, you have a cold, if you can't, you have the flu.

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1 minute ago, Phil. said:

If there is a fifty pound note laying on the towpath outside your boat, if you can be bothered to go and get it, you have a cold, if you can't, you have the flu.

 

Inflation must be higher than I thought!!

 

48 minutes ago, Grebe said:

apply the £20 note on the floor test - if you pick it up you have a cold - if you leave it where it isyou have flu

 

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Just now, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

Inflation must be higher than I thought!!

 

 

Ah, my mistake for not reading the whole thread, but the fact remains

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1 hour ago, Jennifer McM said:

High doses of Vit D (which is a hormone by the way) is much better for you (IMO as a non-medical person). The dose is way above Gov's recommend advice https://vitamindwiki.com/Can+You+Overdose+on+Vitamin+D+-+It's+Harder+Than+You+Think). 

 

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Or you could just make sure your diet includes eggs and fatty fish, as well as exposing yourself to sunlight.

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16 minutes ago, Machpoint005 said:

 

Or you could just make sure your diet includes eggs and fatty fish, as well as exposing yourself to sunlight.

 

Sunlight is pretty rare at the time of the year when flu is prevalent, and exposing oneself runs the risk of the aforementioned pneumonia (as well as arrest).

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2 hours ago, alan_fincher said:

My (limited!) understanding is that it is formulated to protect you from the strains of flu they think people are most likely to succumb to in that particular winter.

The pattern of flu variants is constantly evolving, so there can never be a vaccine that guarantees you won't get flu, but the chances are massively reduced.

 

Some strains of flu are pretty nasty, and obviously lots of people die from it each winter, although they are clearly people already weaker and more vulnerable than many of us believe we are.

 

I had the inoculation last winter for the first time, and felt absolutely no ill effects whatsoever.  I didn't get flu, but then most winters I don't get flu.

Flu and colds are different things, and it will do nothing at all to reduce your chances of getting a cold, (or indeed "man flu"!).

 

 

 

 

Pretty spot on summary.

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4 minutes ago, Mac of Cygnet said:

 

Sunlight is pretty rare at the time of the year when flu is prevalent, and exposing oneself runs the risk of the aforementioned pneumonia (as well as arrest).

For sunlight to be effective in terms of Vit D metabolisation you should completely expose your torso.  It would make for an interesting defence in court!

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2 hours ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

And fourthly, there are persistent rumours that you feel like shyte for a week or so after having one. Is this real or is it a 'reverse placebo' effect where peeps expect to get flu symptoms after having it, so they do? 

We used to encourage our (NHS) staff to take up the vaccine and lots did. From memory none suffered any adverse effects as you describe. Neither does Jan who gets a free jab every year as she is asthmatic. 

 

Worth mentioning - You can also get vaccinated at pharmacies including the ones in the likes of Tesco. This will also be free as it would be at your GP if you are entitled to one.

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