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alan_fincher

Nice Clear CRT Car Park Charges Sign.

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Respectfully Quoted: A Dictionary of Quotations.  1989.
 
 
 
NUMBER: 2019
AUTHOR: Lewis Carroll (1832–98)
QUOTATION: “When I use a word,” Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, “it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less.” “The question is,” said Alice, “whether you can make words mean so many different things.” “The question is,” said Humpty Dumpty, “which is to be master—that’s all.”
ATTRIBUTION: LEWIS CARROLL (Charles L. Dodgson), Through the Looking-Glass, chapter 6, p. 205 (1934). First published in 1872.

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On 25/08/2018 at 09:26, Captain Pegg said:

I don't think it does mean that. I suspect the intention is that the hourly charges apply on the same calendar day in which case the terminology "up to 24 hours" is entirely appropriate. Once the stay covers more than one calendar day it is deemed to be "overnight". That fits with the way the law recognises days by calendar date rather than by number of hours and doesn't recognise part days.

 

JP

Reported post.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

for being too positive.  :)

  • Haha 1

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This sign is not a one off. We came across a similar sign in the long stay car park at Foxton. We had visitors staying overnight. They bought a £2 24 hour ticket when they arrived in the afternoon. After much discussion about what the sign actually means they went out in the morning at about 8am and bought another ticket.

 

Also the sign says that disabled drivers must display a blue badge. Do they also have to pay and display a ticket or not?

And what about disabled passengers? Does the same apply to them if they've turned up in a car with a driver who is not disabled?

 

No doubt whoever did the wording of the sign knew what they wanted to say but they wern't very good at putting it down in writing.

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14 hours ago, Machpoint005 said:

I don't know about anyone else, but I have great difficulty working out what "12am" and "12pm" actually signify. 

 

The meridiem (the "m" in "am" and "pm") is at 12 noon. Noon is neither before nor after meridiem, it is the meridiem, and 12 midnight is both before and after it by exactly 12 hours. We should therefore say "12 noon" or "12 midnight", or use 12:00h and 00:00h as appropriate.

 

I visit my customers by appointment, arranging a specific time to arrive. I've given up suggesting "12.00 midday" to people as the majority of the Great British Public don't seem to understand what that I mean by that, and will ask me for clarification. Most puzzling.  I don't really know how to answer the question "12.00 midday? What time is that?" so I tend not to offer it as an option these days. 

 

Perhaps I'll test out your version "12.00 noon" and see it that means anything to otherwise apparently intelligent people!

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Any notion if calendar days is shot to pieces by the offer of a 24 hour ticket, I'm sure that was the point being made. I assume as others do that "No overnight parking" should really mean "charges apply 24 hours every day including bank holidays" (some add Christmas as well as by a curious anomaly it isn't a bank holiday)

 

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On 26/08/2018 at 11:00, Machpoint005 said:

I don't know about anyone else, but I have great difficulty working out what "12am" and "12pm" actually signify. 

 

The meridiem (the "m" in "am" and "pm") is at 12 noon. Noon is neither before nor after meridiem, it is the meridiem, and 12 midnight is both before and after it by exactly 12 hours. We should therefore say "12 noon" or "12 midnight", or use 12:00h and 00:00h as appropriate.

Wikipedia says that 12 midnight is 12am and 12 noon is 12pm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/12-hour_clock

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9 minutes ago, WotEver said:

So sign in to Wikipedia and change it :)

 

There's a logical element to that though - 11:59 is one minute to noon so 11:59am, 12:01 is one minute past noon so 12:01pm. Although it's nonsense to have 12am or 12pm it would be really illogical to call 12 noon 12am

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3 hours ago, George and Dragon said:

There's a logical element to that though - 11:59 is one minute to noon so 11:59am, 12:01 is one minute past noon so 12:01pm. Although it's nonsense to have 12am or 12pm it would be really illogical to call 12 noon 12am 

Also 23:59 is one minute to midnight so 11:59pm, 10:01 is one minute past midnight so 12:01am. Although it's nonsense to have 12am or 12pm it is equally illogical to call 12 midnight 12pm as it's exactly 12 hours after AND 12 hours before the meridiem.

 

See what I did there?

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5 hours ago, Machpoint005 said:

Also 23:59 is one minute to midnight so 11:59pm, 10:01 is one minute past midnight so 12:01am. Although it's nonsense to have 12am or 12pm it is equally illogical to call 12 midnight 12pm as it's exactly 12 hours after AND 12 hours before the meridiem.

 

See what I did there?

As well as the typo?

 :)

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I got a phone call from a mate who found himself stuck in the airport in Gran Canaria having missed his flight by 24 hours!  The flight time was five past midnight on the 21st, so he turned up at 10pm on the 21st, waiting for midnight...

 

He had to give me his credit card details so that I could find him another flight on the pc and book it for him. 

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10 hours ago, George and Dragon said:

As well as the typo?

 :)

I made sure you read it though! :cheers:

10 hours ago, WotEver said:

I got a phone call from a mate who found himself stuck in the airport in Gran Canaria having missed his flight by 24 hours!  The flight time was five past midnight on the 21st, so he turned up at 10pm on the 21st, waiting for midnight...

 

He had to give me his credit card details so that I could find him another flight on the pc and book it for him. 

Most of us now accept that the date changes at midnight, but at sea in the early 19th century the new day DID begin at midday.

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7 hours ago, Machpoint005 said:

I made sure you read it though! :cheers:

We appear to be arguing the same thing (which isn't the best way to have an argument) :)

7 hours ago, Machpoint005 said:

Most of us now accept that the date changes at midnight, but at sea in the early 19th century the new day DID begin at midday.

And for some religions the new day starts at sunset (which confuses the hell out of me) although I suppose it made sense in a pre-technological era.

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16 hours ago, George and Dragon said:

We appear to be arguing the same thing (which isn't the best way to have an argument) :)

And for some religions the new day starts at sunset (which confuses the hell out of me) although I suppose it made sense in a pre-technological era.

Nothing to do with technology and all to do with religion.  The idea is that before God (in whatever form s/he takes) created the world/universe - there was darkness, and then light was created.  The ancient wisdoms therefore understood that darkness preceded light and ancient writings recorded that

 

"And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night: and the evening and the morning were the first day." "And God called the light Day, and the darkness He called Night. And there was evening and there was morning, one day."  Genesis 1:5

Edited by Tanglewood
to add punctuation

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