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Pubs of the past

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Remarkable - absolutely unrecognisable compared with the Cape of today.

It does remind us why the full name for "pub" is "public house", as it looks just like a couple of ordinary terraced houses.

 

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50 minutes ago, Athy said:

Remarkable - absolutely unrecognisable compared with the Cape of today.

It does remind us why the full name for "pub" is "public house", as it looks just like a couple of ordinary terraced houses.

 

It Is, and looking at the pub today it looks very original compared to some but has obviously changed enormously. 

I thought others may have similar pictures of other canalside inns.

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Just now, BWM said:

It Is, and looking at the pub today it looks very original compared to some but has obviously changed enormously. 

I thought others may have similar pictures of other canalside inns.

I hope they do. There are doubtless loads of these photos floating around on the internet.

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4 hours ago, BWM said:

It Is, and looking at the pub today it looks very original compared to some but has obviously changed enormously. 

I thought others may have similar pictures of other canalside inns.

 

The Punch Bowl Tuttle Hill Nuneaton.Demolished late 1950.

Admiral Nelson, Braunston.

Spotted Cow, Bugby.

Greyhound Sutton Stop.

Boat Inn Braunston.

 

Punch Bowl 1950.JPG

Admiral Nelson1.jpg

 

spotted cow whilton locks[1].png

Rocket o-s Greyhound.jpg

Boat Inn Braunston.jpg

 

Photo's apart from Punch Bowl & Spotted Cow from CRT Archive.

Edited by Ray T
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18 minutes ago, Ray T said:

Boat Inn Birdingbury.

17308835_776810902472221_8094592951092520374_n.jpg

 

Picture from NarrowBoat magazine.

 

Two Boats "Ichinton."

http://pubsthenandnow.blogspot.com/2013/01/100-two-boats-long-itchington.html

 

Two+Boats,+Long+Itchington+1981.jpg

 

 

 

The two boats has changed massively between 1981 and 1997, with all the chimneys disappearing. 

The fisherman, complete with car suggests the canal wasn't being used much for boating in the earlier picture. Quite sad that someone whitewashed away the mixed brickwork showing the evolution of this building. 

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I believe the same picture of the Cape of Good Hope featured in a recent edition of Narrow Boat together with a few words about the landlady of the pub and the boat. I don't have the article to hand but I recall the photograph was taken c.1910.

 

To the best of my knowledge the landlady at the time - born Ellen Hanson - was married and widowed three times by the age of 50 and took on the pub after the death of her second husband Seth Spilsbury. Her third husband - Thomas Neal - had previously been the publican at the Boat Inn, Birdingbury with his first wife Sarah Crowshaw, one of the Atherstone family of canal company workers/boat builders.

 

JP

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16 hours ago, Captain Pegg said:

I believe the same picture of the Cape of Good Hope featured in a recent edition of Narrow Boat together with a few words about the landlady of the pub and the boat. I don't have the article to hand but I recall the photograph was taken c.1910.

 

To the best of my knowledge the landlady at the time - born Ellen Hanson - was married and widowed three times by the age of 50 and took on the pub after the death of her second husband Seth Spilsbury. Her third husband - Thomas Neal - had previously been the publican at the Boat Inn, Birdingbury with his first wife Sarah Crowshaw, one of the Atherstone family of canal company workers/boat builders.

 

JP

I've given up on Narrow boat magazine, the picture quality is of a low standard throughout, sadly. I understand they are by definition working with older material but have been unimpressed with later editions. 

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Stoke Bruerne
See the source image
 
Bridge Inn Etruria Trent & Mersey
See the source image
 
New Inn Bedworth, Coventry Canal

New Inn Bedworth.jpg

Edited by Ray T

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44 minutes ago, BWM said:

I've given up on Narrow boat magazine, the picture quality is of a low standard throughout, sadly. I understand they are by definition working with older material but have been unimpressed with later editions. 

The latest Narrow Boat magazine really should be called Barge magazine, or Wide Beam boat magazine, as increasingly it has less and less of it's space devoted to the subject which its title implies it should be.

I think it is fairly poor these days - a great shame, after a very much better start.

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4 minutes ago, alan_fincher said:

The latest Narrow Boat magazine really should be called Barge magazine, or Wide Beam boat magazine, as increasingly it has less and less of it's space devoted to the subject which its title implies it should be.

I think it is fairly poor these days - a great shame, after a very much better start.

Absolutely, there has been more inclusion of wide boats and barges of late, which is absurd given the title!

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1 hour ago, BWM said:

I've given up on Narrow boat magazine, the picture quality is of a low standard throughout, sadly. I understand they are by definition working with older material but have been unimpressed with later editions. 

 

20 minutes ago, alan_fincher said:

The latest Narrow Boat magazine really should be called Barge magazine, or Wide Beam boat magazine, as increasingly it has less and less of it's space devoted to the subject which its title implies it should be.

I think it is fairly poor these days - a great shame, after a very much better start.

I think that's just a consequence of them having used all the naturally available and researchable material of significant interest from the era of narrow boat carrying. Recent editions do give the sense that the run of the magazine has reached a natural conclusion. The subscription is useful for giving access to electronic copies of all the back issues.

 

For clarity the information I gave above was my own and not from the details in the magazine.

 

JP

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6 minutes ago, Ray T said:

Tusses Bridge, Longford Coventry, forget what the pub was called.

 

See the source image

Don't know its name, but a close examination shows that it belonged to Salt & Co., a Burton on Trent brewery. This may also help to date the picture, as Salt's, having survived an earlier financial crisis, was in business until 1927 when it was taken over.

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10 minutes ago, Ray T said:

Tusses Bridge, Longford Coventry, forget what the pub was called.

 

See the source image

Elephant & Castle?

 

In my head I am thinking it was run by a family called Beasley (or Beesley or Bazeley) who were not related to the folk of the same name at The Greyhound. Maybe I am getting confused with the Sephtons and the Sephtons who were also at both locations and not related.

 

I'll check some records and do some more research if required.

 

JP

 

ETA - no longer a pub.

Edited by Captain Pegg

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So it was the Sephton family of Tusses Bridge that ran both the pub and the boatyard. I see the newspaper article states that the two independent Sephton boat building companies were created by members of the same family; a fact that may have been corroborated by the subject of the article. I am sure there has been discussion regarding this point on the forum which tended toward the idea they were not related. At face value it would seem likely they are related but I don't believe there is any evidence. I can't link them in my records but I do know members of both sets of Sephtons married into the Beasley family of The Greyhound. This sort of inter-marriage between families of licensees seemed to be common.

 

JP

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Further information on Sephton's:

 

http://forum.historiccoventry.co.uk/main/search-posts.php?q=sephton's&search_in=searchposts

See post No 8

 

heritage_sephtons.jpg

 

Francis Sephton is the stocky bearded man with his hands together in the centre of the photograph. His son Walter who took over The Boat in 1901 is the large man on the extreme left with the hammer on his shoulder. Jim Sephton, moved into the Bedworth area in the early 1800s and with his three sons, William, Andrew and Francis, set up a thriving boat building business at Sutton Stop. They were based at 'The Dockyard' where the Oxford and Coventry Canals meet at Hawkesbury Junction. Not content with boat building, Jim Sephton built 'The Boat' public house in Blackhorse Lane around the middle of the 1800s. Francis Sephton was the first to keep the pub. Crumbling documents, yellowing with age, in his own handwriting, trace his connection back to 1857, but apparently he was there even before that date. The census of 1881 records 57 years old Francis Sephton as a boat builder and publican living with his wife Elizabeth, age 56 who is listed as handicapped, blind. They have five daughters and one son living with them. One of the daughters, Caroline is living with her farmer husband George Barber. There is no pub name recorded on the census and the road name was given as Green Lane an early name for Blackhorse Road. Francis Sephton was at the pub until he died in 1892. The pub stayed in the Sephton family and was managed for them by a Walter Jackson until 1901. As well as serving the boat trade the pub's customers included miners from the Victoria, Exhall and Hawkesbury Colleries. As well as boat building, the pub trade was obviously in the Sephton blood. In addition to building and owning 'The Boat', the 1881 census shows John Sephton, wife Hannah and their two daughters at The Bird in Hand, Aldermans Green, and Francis and Hannah Sephton at The New Inn, Longford. Another of Jim Sephton's sons, William was recorded at The Greyhound, Hawksbury (Sutton Stop). 1901 saw the Boat move back into direct control by the Sefton family. Walter Sephton who was the fourth child of William and Faith and had been born at The Greyhound, took over with his wife Harriet. Harriet's maiden name was Beasley, the family who had taken over The Greyhound from the Sephtons. Walter and Harriet were at the Boat for over fifty years until 1954. My wife is related to Mary Beasley who kept the Greyhound for many years.
Edited by Ray T
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1 hour ago, Ray T said:

 

 

Francis Sephton is the stocky bearded man with his hands together in the centre of the photograph. His son Walter who took over The Boat in 1901 is the large man on the extreme left with the hammer on his shoulder. Jim Sephton, moved into the Bedworth area in the early 1800s and with his three sons, William, Andrew and Francis, set up a thriving boat building business at Sutton Stop. They were based at 'The Dockyard' where the Oxford and Coventry Canals meet at Hawkesbury Junction. Not content with boat building, Jim Sephton built 'The Boat' public house in Blackhorse Lane around the middle of the 1800s. Francis Sephton was the first to keep the pub. Crumbling documents, yellowing with age, in his own handwriting, trace his connection back to 1857, but apparently he was there even before that date. The census of 1881 records 57 years old Francis Sephton as a boat builder and publican living with his wife Elizabeth, age 56 who is listed as handicapped, blind. They have five daughters and one son living with them. One of the daughters, Caroline is living with her farmer husband George Barber. There is no pub name recorded on the census and the road name was given as Green Lane an early name for Blackhorse Road. Francis Sephton was at the pub until he died in 1892. The pub stayed in the Sephton family and was managed for them by a Walter Jackson until 1901. As well as serving the boat trade the pub's customers included miners from the Victoria, Exhall and Hawkesbury Colleries. As well as boat building, the pub trade was obviously in the Sephton blood. In addition to building and owning 'The Boat', the 1881 census shows John Sephton, wife Hannah and their two daughters at The Bird in Hand, Aldermans Green, and Francis and Hannah Sephton at The New Inn, Longford. Another of Jim Sephton's sons, William was recorded at The Greyhound, Hawksbury (Sutton Stop). 1901 saw the Boat move back into direct control by the Sefton family. Walter Sephton who was the fourth child of William and Faith and had been born at The Greyhound, took over with his wife Harriet. Harriet's maiden name was Beasley, the family who had taken over The Greyhound from the Sephtons. Walter and Harriet were at the Boat for over fifty years until 1954. My wife is related to Mary Beasley who kept the Greyhound for many years.

I believe the John Sephton you reference from the 1881 census is from the Tusses Bridge Sephtons. You will note that record shows him being born c.1810 in Leighton Buzzard. I can't link him to James (Jim) or Francis (Frank) of the Sutton Stop Sephtons.

 

Tom, one of his sons from an earlier marriage to Mary Troth married an Ellen Beasley and their son Arthur married Alice Beasley, sister of the Harriett Beasley you mention above. Incidentally another sister, Abigail, married a chap called Harry Halford Wilkins who is my great great uncle on my father's side which is the non-boating side of my family.

 

The census information shows all the Sephtons as so intermingled in terms of residence and marriages that it does seem likely they are one large family but the link pre-dates readily available records.

 

JP

 

Edited by Captain Pegg

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On 13/07/2018 at 14:56, Captain Pegg said:

 

I think that's just a consequence of them having used all the naturally available and researchable material of significant interest from the era of narrow boat carrying. Recent editions do give the sense that the run of the magazine has reached a natural conclusion. The subscription is useful for giving access to electronic copies of all the back issues.

 

For clarity the information I gave above was my own and not from the details in the magazine.

 

JP

It does seem to have run it's course and I guess there is a finite amount of material, but with so many craft about they could focus on the histories of individual boats and possibly document the many restorations that take place.

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One of our favourites in the 1960's - The Shovel, Cowley on the Grand Union. Now known as the "Malt Shovel"

 

shovel.jpg.ea282a5d56cd6fc0c535187409124808.jpg

 

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One of my continuing favourites is the Rising Sun in Berkhamsted, (generally known as "The Riser").

It's surprisingly hard to find older photos of it, possibly because it has no road frontage, only a canal one.

 

Rising+Sun.jpg

 

DSCF6907.JPG

Edited by alan_fincher

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15 minutes ago, David Schweizer said:

One of our favourites in the 1960's - The Shovel, Cowley on the Grand Union. Now known as the "Malt Shovel"

 

shovel.jpg.ea282a5d56cd6fc0c535187409124808.jpg

 

 

 

One of very few areas near London  that even today is unchanged. The pub is a shadow of its former self though. 

1 minute ago, alan_fincher said:

One of my continuing favourites is the Rising Sun in Berkhamsted, (generally known as "The Riser").

It's surprisingly hard to find older photos of it, possibly because it has no road frontage, only a canal one.

 

Rising+Sun.jpg

A great opportunity to grab one as you boat through, damn fine ales too!

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