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40 minutes ago, TheBiscuits said:

I have never seen a better trick than chicane fencing wide enough to easily get a bike through.  No impediment at all to prams, wheelchairs or slowly moving cyclists, and a huge problem for speeding cyclists.  

 

I wouldn't want to see them every few hundred yards but strategically placed ones are fantastic, and as they are only two offset fences they are not that expensive either.  The only real criteria is that there is sufficient path width to install them.

 

A couple of weeks ago I had to manoeuvre my bike through a wooden kissing gate on the River Stort towpath at Roydon. It was a bit of hassle, but I thought at least it would keep the motorbikes away.  But on boating past later in the day I saw that some scrote had removed the gate completely - it looked as if one of the hinges had been unbolted.

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9 minutes ago, David Mack said:

 

A couple of weeks ago I had to manoeuvre my bike through a wooden kissing gate on the River Stort towpath at Roydon. It was a bit of hassle, but I thought at least it would keep the motorbikes away.  But on boating past later in the day I saw that some scrote had removed the gate completely - it looked as if one of the hinges had been unbolted.

Yeah, kissing gates are useless for bikes, wheelchairs and prams - they are really only to allow pedestrians through.

 

The chicane fencing is simply two offset straight or L-shaped fences.  No moving parts, can be made very sturdy or in keeping with heritage or vernacular architecture.

 

cyclestreets10251-size180.jpg

 

Quote

Nasty chicane feature obstruction, presumably intended to stop cyclists emerging onto the road.

 

Heh.  The caption from the feral cyclists brigade says it all, for an obstacle that does not require a cyclist to dismount but forces them to slow down near a blind road junction.

 

Quote

https://www.cyclestreets.net/galleries/121/

 

Engineers love to put barriers on cycle paths. The excuses are myriad - for "safety", to prevent motorcycle access, to keep cows off, to prevent conflict. But it's funny how you never see them across roads, unless they are specifically put there to keep people out. So we know why they are really put on cycle paths.

Barriers have no place on cycle routes. You don't find them in the Netherlands, and there is no excuse for using them here.

 

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Chicane fencing may well be a solution to the problem of speeding cyclists and at the same time a deterrent for the motor cyclist or those on quad bikes. Something needs to be done. Even if it is to educate some cyclists to get off their bikes at times and places when and where it matters.

 

I notice the rat run on the foot path from Birmingham Museum to the Library now has a security guard getting the faster cyclists off their bikes. May be the developers there building the new structures there have had enough of those selfish enough to ride despite large signage asking cyclist to dismount in the restricted areas there. 

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On 10/08/2018 at 18:03, Heartland said:

Chicane fencing may well be a solution to the problem of speeding cyclists and at the same time a deterrent for the motor cyclist or those on quad bikes. Something needs to be done. Even if it is to educate some cyclists to get off their bikes at times and places when and where it matters.

 

I notice the rat run on the foot path from Birmingham Museum to the Library now has a security guard getting the faster cyclists off their bikes. May be the developers there building the new structures there have had enough of those selfish enough to ride despite large signage asking cyclist to dismount in the restricted areas there. 

And that shows that there are many cyclists who refuse to obey signs, be mindful of others or become educated so some form of supervision is needed. My take is that the organization that has put cycle route signs along many towpaths should now be required to provide adequate wardens with some  powers to bite if necessary.

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