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19 minutes ago, ianali said:

That’s for people that weren’t good enough at school to play proper football. 

or for them that could take a knock or 20 and carry on playing rather than roll around like you'd been shot with the slightest touch :cheers:

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3 hours ago, ianali said:

That’s for people that weren’t good enough at school to play proper football. 

Football was what was played at girls schools in our area along with rounders and my liitle pony.

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18 minutes ago, mrsmelly said:

Football was what was played at girls schools in our area along with rounders and my liitle pony.

Some form of toilet training?

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3 hours ago, ianali said:

That’s for people that weren’t good enough at school to play proper football. 

They didn't play Soccer at my School, just Rugby, and we weren't allowed to cry when we lost! ?

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Much as I prefer watching football to rugby, I have to agree that simulating injury to try to con the referee is a plague on the game. The arch exponents of this dark art at international level are (1) Neymar of Brazil, who quite often is a target because he is a very good player but somewhat pint-sized, but then wildly exaggerates his pain. And (2) Pepe of Portugal, who is incompetent at it; he'll routinely go down clutching his face when he's obviously just had the most harmless little contact on some less sensitive part of his anatomy with someone.

 

Now that the VAR technology is being used to review the most important decisions referees make, I'm hopeful that its use may be expanded to penalise the cheats, and conversely the players who really do set out to injure an opponent. If Pepe knew that he was risking a retrospective yellow card for simulation a few minutes later he would have to improve his acting skills, and England would have had less trouble beating Colombia yesterday if Barrios had got a red card just before half time for his head butt uppercut on Henderson's jaw. Just as defenders are now becoming more careful about nobbling opposing strikers because so many penalties have been awarded at this World Cup, so after a while the likelihood of a retrospective yellow or red card would have the effect of preventing a lot of this behaviour.

 

I get the impression that both football and rugby come with serious risks of injury even when everyone on the pitch tries to play cleanly, but the nature of the typical injuries is different? In rugby bodies collide, and I know that my nephew who plays it (as an amateur) has had various broken bones over the years, but in football it tends to be feet, ankles and knees, particularly one player's boot going into another's ankle in a tackle.

 

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2 minutes ago, Dr Bob said:

...but we are wise.

Wise? I thought you owned a boat!!

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1 minute ago, rusty69 said:

He also owns a plastic duck! 

Naaah..........Hes killed and eaten it. Havnt you noticed its not shown up since the foto shopped stuff he stuck on here a couple of weeks ago!!

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30 minutes ago, Peter X said:

Much as I prefer watching football to rugby, I have to agree that simulating injury to try to con the referee is a plague on the game. The arch exponents of this dark art at international level are (1) Neymar of Brazil, who quite often is a target because he is a very good player but somewhat pint-sized, but then wildly exaggerates his pain. And (2) Pepe of Portugal, who is incompetent at it; he'll routinely go down clutching his face when he's obviously just had the most harmless little contact on some less sensitive part of his anatomy with someone.

 

 

I enjoy watching a good game of football but so far in the World Cup I have only managed to see a couple of games. I was impressed with how little "acting" there was in the Japan V Belgium game. I thought Japans passing was so much better than Belgiums who seemed to give the ball away a lot. The other game I saw quite a lot of was last Sunday (24th) but I had better not say who was playing or how much acting I thought there was as most of the folk on here might be a little sensitive on the subject. :-) 

 

haggis - yes, I know Scotland didn't qualify (but we are SO good at snatching defeat from the jaws of victory) so no point in coming back with anti Scotland comments ? 

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My introduction to football was at a very early age. On Saturday afternoon my dad would take me to watch Ilford play. We stood on the terrace but I couldn't see a thing amongst a forest of old boys trouser legs that smelled of stew, have fag ash rain down upon me and getting spat on and getting trodden on, it was awful. My dad said it was nice. We were forced to play football at school, ''In the winter!!!'' wearing a pair of secondhand football boots two sizes too big for me, stinky school shorts with underpants removed. It was horribly freezing and no fun at all.  Those old football boots with big deep leather peg studs did cover the ankles though. If the ground was soft the pegs would sink in deeply, so that you became rooted to the spot and couldn't move at all, never mind running about and tackling. And as for that heavy bladder filled leather football which no one dared to head for fear of getting knocked out, but is was very rare that anyone ever managed to kick the heavy thing high enough to head it anyway. Everyone tried to avoid the rotten thing entirely, which made the master mad. One boy, a show off, richer than most of us showed up one day with a new pair of boots,''Continentals'' he called them, light weight, short rubber studs with no ankle protection, similar to whats worn today, he had a new Viking racing bike too.  We straight away went for his ankles with our old boots in tackles, which made him hobble.  My position on the field, I think was what's called ''Inside out''.   Modern lightweight footballs should be half filled with water which will slosh about inside it, making its movements on the ground and in the air unpredictable and so make a boring and tiresome game much more interesting.

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14 minutes ago, mrsmelly said:

Naaah..........Hes killed and eaten it. Havnt you noticed its not shown up since the foto shopped stuff he stuck on here a couple of weeks ago!!

You missed the Hamlet photo last week. The duck still lives.

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8 minutes ago, Dr Bob said:

You missed the Hamlet photo last week. The duck still lives.

Alas, poor Donald. I bbq'd him Horatio. Wiv some fava beans and a nice bottle of yellow tail. 

Edited by rusty69

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7 hours ago, Athy said:

Er, I think it's next year in England and Wales - cricket, of course.

But that's in summer, when nobody with any sense plays football. 

 

Rugby is a game played by men with odd-shaped balls.

(and by women too, these days, and quite right too).

 

 

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28 minutes ago, Machpoint005 said:

But that's in summer, when nobody with any sense plays football. 

 

 

 

 

:clapping:

Edited by Athy

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Quarter finals weekend. Quite excited as England seldom get this far. Will be watching in a bar in Chester. Daughter is watching on a big screen at a horse racing meet, son at a bbq which also has a big screen. Mrsmelly wont be watching as his eyes are on something else in Newbury! Enjoy the game everyone, I think we will win and then it’s the semis! I was was too young to watch the 66 final. I am beginning to believe  this year may be my turn to see England win. 

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The problem with rugby is that, mostly, even the top teams are unable to progress far into enemy territory without regularly hoofing the ball in that direction, playing the 'percentage game'. Football flirted with this notion back in the 80's when the likes of Wimbledon had some success but thankfully, things progressed. It seems that the progression in rugby is ever more hoofing it. It's great to win of course but is this progression great to watch, really? It's unfortunate for the game of rugby that its nature rules out success using an entertaining style, in favour of pragmatism. at least it doesn't sink to the depths of hockey, where progression seems limited to whacking the ball as hard as possible towards defender's feet, in order to 'achieve' penalty corners.

 

Rugby has close games between well matched teams. When the teams are mismatched the result is entirely predictable, with landslide victories to the superior team pretty well every time. Not so in football, the underdog has a much better chance, as we have seen. 

 

 

 

 

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Well the wife wants to watch tomorrow too so I will take the opportunity to do the shopping whilst it's quiet. I will likely be home in time for the penalty shoot out though.

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2 hours ago, Gareth E said:

>> Rugby has close games between well matched teams. When the teams are mismatched the result is entirely predictable, with landslide victories to the superior team pretty well every time. Not so in football, the underdog has a much better chance, as we have seen. <<

 

I won't comment on your "hoofing the ball upfield", because it is inaccurate on so many counts, except to say that rugby is a game in which territorial advantage matters much more. No team ever scored unless it had possession though.

 

As for the underdog having a better chance, that sort of suggests that luck has a much bigger part to play in the round-ball game, but nevertheless many Premier League games are a complete yawn-fest. The FIFA World Cup hasn't had many of those, I'm happy to concede, and there has been some real teamwork on display.   

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1 hour ago, Machpoint005 said:

I won't comment on your "hoofing the ball upfield", because it is inaccurate on so many counts, except to say that rugby is a game in which territorial advantage matters much more. No team ever scored unless it had possession though.

 

As for the underdog having a better chance, that sort of suggests that luck has a much bigger part to play in the round-ball game, but nevertheless many Premier League games are a complete yawn-fest. The FIFA World Cup hasn't had many of those, I'm happy to concede, and there has been some real teamwork on display.   

Not so much luck really. An inferior football team can produce a move or moment of brilliance that results in a goal. If their defenders then play at the top of their form it's possible this team could win the game. Not so in rugby where the team with the fitter/ stronger/ more tactically aware/ better coached players will win easily, every single time. The rugby world cup may as well have just around 8 teams taking part and ditch the other nations, they have no chance whatsoever.

 

Talking of luck, I'm wondering if rugby is played with an odd shaped ball in order to introduce a little luck of the bounce, in order to prevent the results being even more predictable. 

Edited by Gareth E

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36 minutes ago, Gareth E said:

Not so much luck really. An inferior football team can produce a move or moment of brilliance that results in a goal. If their defenders then play at the top of their form it's possible this team could win the game. Not so in rugby where the team with the fitter/ stronger/ more tactically aware/ better coached players will win easily, every single time. The rugby world cup may as well have just around 8 teams taking part and ditch the other nations, they have no chance whatsoever.

 

Talking of luck, I'm wondering if rugby is played with an odd shaped ball in order to introduce a little luck of the bounce, in order to prevent the results being even more predictable. 

I remember a game between Italy and England not so long ago where the Italian tactics totally flummoxed the English ... the English captain asked the referee for advice and was soundly told that he was there to referee, not to help either side.... fortunately for England the coach was able to tell them what to do at half time and they rescued the game... but it would have been a great day for the sport if Italy had won.

 

When I played rugby the bounce was very predictable .... if the ball was kicked properly ... it always bounces high on the 3rd bounce.

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