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LadyG

Flat tyre, again, and again....

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I have a nice little Falcon ladies bike, it sits  outside and resists rust amazingly. So one day as I was out and about it got a flat so I wheeled it home and sent for a new tube, it was a 26" and the outer stated 700 x 40 [plus some other numbers in  parenthesis], anyway I kinda got it on and blew it up, next day it  was flat. So I sent for a 700c x 40, but it came as a 700 x 35 ...[  40]? but on the tube it also said 28" These are good tubes: [Swalbe] It seemed to fit the outer tyre.

With some cursing and difficulty, I managed to get the outer off and replaced the inner, but again it was flat in the morning.  

The valve passes the "spit" test, and the previous new inner[the 26"] has no puncture . There is no thorn or cut in the tyre. The valve cap is fitted.

I use a Zefal hand pump [very hard work] , the bike had a short test drive last night, it held air during a 200 metre test ride.

I feel a bit of an idiot, having fixed numerous punctures, but these bigger tyres are hard work compared to racing tyres.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/SCHWALBE-700-x-35c-Inner-Tube-40mm-Schrader-Car-Auto-Valve-AV17/253290718619?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649

Edited by LadyG

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I replaced like with like, and car type valves are best as I usually get my garage to blow them up.

I will blow it up again tonight and test the valve again. 

I have sent for tyre levers from China...

I am losing the will to live...................

 

Edited by LadyG

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10 minutes ago, mrsmelly said:

Do you have the slime stuff in the tube?

no: I needed new rim tape but used some tape used for stopping draughts, it looks like a better alternative tbh.

I have never heard of slime stuff for bikes,

EDIT on ebay now, can't find slime type 700c x 40 , I m getting more confused as to size.

Edited by LadyG

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2 minutes ago, LadyG said:

no: I needed new rim tape but used some tape used for stopping draughts, it looks like a better alternative tbh.

I have never heard of slime stuff for bikes, 

Green slime, it works you can buy it just google inner tube slime. You can also buy inner tubes with it pre filled which is what I did for the bosses bike.

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Spoke end sticking up?

Thorn in the tyre that you have not found?

 

I'm pleased to say you are no longer ignored but if I am being ignored than I can't help you!

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Take the tyre off and run your fingers carefully around the inside and check for anything protruding in, could be a bit of flint, or glass. Do not put a tyre back on with tyre levers, you stand a very good chance of nipping the tube and causing another puncture, if it's hard work, use a bit of talcum powder.

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/SLIME-SEALANT-PUNCTURE-PROTECTION-UNIVERSAL-TYRE-INNER-TUBE-MTB-ROAD-KIDS-PRAM/362146626094?hash=item54519efa2e:m:mpxl-5fv0JP73hmLrZgsrFw

 

This the slime being talked about, don't like it myself, but I do know people who swear by it.

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Yes, the problem is that I just can't get it back on without using spoons/tyre levers [its very very tight and stiff]. and the tubes seem fine afterwards, no puncture.

There is no thorn or cut inside, if there were, the tube would be punctured , but its not. I checked in water bowl, and it is still inflated, the original punctured tube does have a tiny hole in it, near the valve, but on the outer side.

I'll try talcum, but at the moment the tyre is in place, and its a nightmare to remove.

Needless to say there are no bike shops any more :(

I just feel that I've spent enough, and got nowhere.

Edited by LadyG

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Before removing the tyre mark it with chalk at the valve position. After removing the tube, blowing it up and finding the puncture, mark it and lay it on the tyre with the valve at the valve hole. Look at the puncture mark on the tube in relation to the tyre which will pinpoint exactly where and whats in the tyre that caused the puncture.

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9 minutes ago, bizzard said:

Before removing the tyre mark it with chalk at the valve position. After removing the tube, blowing it up and finding the puncture, mark it and lay it on the tyre with the valve at the valve hole. Look at the puncture mark on the tube in relation to the tyre which will pinpoint exactly where and whats in the tyre that caused the puncture.

OK, wildo, but as I say, the last tube had no puncture!

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2 minutes ago, LadyG said:

OK, wildo, but as I say, the last tube had no puncture!

Your bike is a Falcon with 26'' wheels, Quite old? so probably has the old fashioned short valve, unscrew the knurled nut and the valve slips out of two side slots, the type that years ago used to have replaceable valve rubber on it.  and not car type with Schrader valve core, nor the longer thin high pressure type for 27'' rims.

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I'm getting too old for these shenanigans, after two visits to this thread I actually got to post number 10 before it occurred to me that Fat = Flat.

 

Magpie Patrick adds - sorry for spoiling the joke, I've edited the title after making the same mistake as you!

 

Edited by magpie patrick
  • Haha 1

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23 minutes ago, bizzard said:

Your bike is a Falcon with 26'' wheels, Quite old? so probably has the old fashioned short valve, unscrew the knurled nut and the valve slips out of two side slots, the type that years ago used to have replaceable valve rubber on it.  and not car type with Schrader valve core, nor the longer thin high pressure type for 27'' rims.

Its 700c tyres, I assume wheels are the same. I did not check before I ordered the first tube, you would think 26" would be big enough to inflate the tyre, but it didn't.

I don't know how old the bike is, its got gripshifts,  less than 8 years at a guess.  Its Schrader valves. the original tube was 700 x 40. made in Taiwan.

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If the tyre goes FLAT and the valve is not leaking, you must have a puncture.  logic. If the new tube is punctured, its something stuck through the tyre or  a spoke end or fitting damage, nipped.

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7 minutes ago, LadyG said:

Its 700c tyres, I assume wheels are the same. I did not check before I ordered the first tube, you would think 26" would be big enough to inflate the tyre, but it didn't.

I don't know how old the bike is, its got gripshifts,  less than 8 years at a guess.  Its Schrader valves. the original tube was 700 x 40. made in Taiwan.

The wheel rim is 700mm so roughly 27 1/2'' so a 26'' tube would be too small and be over stretched.

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Most inner tubes are designed to cover a range of sizes,      I.e,700x32-38 so you are probably fine with the one you have, but 26"/650c is of no use at all. 

If the valve isn't defective and there is no puncture, the only possible explanation I can think of is perhaps there is something in the dust cap, pressing on the valve when screwed down and releasing the air? Have a look, or leave it off and see what happens. 

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So here is a lightweight read about tyre sizes https://www.evanscycles.com/coffeestop/advice/beginners-guide-to-wheel-sizing-and-measurements

And here is something a little more comperhensive http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html

Very confussing, but nessesary imformation if you want the correct fit.

 

Getting tyres on and off is often a matter of technique, and generaly doesn’t require levers for either operation; but technique equals lots of practice. 

You should see that the centre of the rim (where the spokes live) is a smaller diameter than the part the tyre lives on. If you pinch the sides if the tyre together with your fingers you will find that the tyre now sits down onto the smaller diameter. Meanwhile on the diagonally opposite side of the wheel you will find that the tyre is sitting higher or even clear of the rim. Place both hands opposite the valve, pinch the tyre whilst moving both hands in opposite directions ( one clockwise, one anti clockwise) towards the valve. A the very least you should now have enough gap between the tyre and rim (at the valve) to ease the tyre off with your finger; a thin tyre lever will save wear on your finger, but shouldn’t require any effort.

This works equaly well for refitting; just a few things to add. Always inflate the tube just enough to gain its proper shape, often just one or two strokes of the pump. This makes it far easier to handle, and will keep it clear of levers if you really need to use them. Check that the tyre is sitting equaly on the rim before fully inflating it; it can sometimes look as though the tyre is “thicker” on one part of the rim. Just push it about with your thumbs untill it looks about right.

Its a good party trick, and useful for helping others without the need to have a set of levers in your pocket.

 

Edited by Eeyore

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31 minutes ago, Eeyore said:

So here is a lightweight read about tyre sizes https://www.evanscycles.com/coffeestop/advice/beginners-guide-to-wheel-sizing-and-measurements

And here is something a little more comperhensive http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html

Very confussing, but nessesary imformation if you want the correct fit.

 

Getting tyres on and off is often a matter of technique, and generaly doesn’t require levers for either operation; but technique equals lots of practice. 

You should see that the centre of the rim (where the spokes live) is a smaller diameter than the part the tyre lives on. If you pinch the sides if the tyre together with your fingers you will find that the tyre now sits down onto the smaller diameter. Meanwhile on the diagonally opposite side of the wheel you will find that the tyre is sitting higher or even clear of the rim. Place both hands opposite the valve, pinch the tyre whilst moving both hands in opposite directions ( one clockwise, one anti clockwise) towards the valve. A the very least you should now have enough gap between the tyre and rim (at the valve) to ease the tyre off with your finger; a thin tyre lever will save wear on your finger, but shouldn’t require any effort.

This works equaly well for refitting; just a few things to add. Always inflate the tube just enough to gain its proper shape, often just one or two strokes of the pump. This makes it far easier to handle, and will keep it clear of levers if you really need to use them. Check that the tyre is sitting equaly on the rim before fully inflating it; it can sometimes look as though the tyre is “thicker” on one part of the rim. Just push it about with your thumbs untill it looks about right.

Its a good party trick, and useful for helping others without the need to have a set of levers in your pocket.

 

Right, I'll try this, I know it works with racing tyres, but these brutes are different gravy.

In my racing bike days, I recall the difficulty finding a bike to fit me [females are built different], managed to get one, then knackered my knee after falling off horse, and had to sell it, still in its box. 

Edited by LadyG
  • Greenie 1

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10 minutes ago, LadyG said:

Right, I'll try this, I know it works with racing tyres, but these brutes are different gravy.

In my racing bike days, I recall the difficulty finding a bike to fit me [females are built different], managed to get one, then knackered my knee after falling off horse, and had to sell it, still in its box. 

As Eeyore mentioned its important to put a little air into the tube after tucking it in. This will help to not nicking the tube on the rim when levering the final tyre bead on. I think you may be nicking the tube on assembly.  Old smooth dessert spoon, fork handles make good tyre levers.

  • Greenie 1

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My MTB has 26" but will take 27' without too much complaint.  Just a bit more tricky fitting it into the tyre.  I had this scenario a few weeks back.  Every trip would end up with a flat after about 30 miles.  Finally tracked it down to a tiny piece of metal, jist big enough the work it's way into the tube, especially when on the trails and landing a bit harder.  If you can find the puncture, mark it with tipp-ex or something like that, line it up with the tyre (making sure its orientated the same way you took out and feel CAREFULLY around the inside of the tyre for anything.  Also do a visual check (I had to use a magnifying glass - mainly because of failing middle aged eye sight) around the are both inside and out.  I didn't find anything with the feel test but found it with the magnifying glass.  A bit of careful digging with a very pointy knife prized it out.

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51 minutes ago, LadyG said:

Right, I'll try this, I know it works with racing tyres, but these brutes are different gravy.

In my racing bike days, I recall the difficulty finding a bike to fit me [females are built different], managed to get one, then knackered my knee after falling off horse, and had to sell it, still in its box. 

I hope you poked some holes in the box …….

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................... waiting for a nice English teacher to correct my last .....................

PS horses are male or female, even gelded, a horse remains male, though obviously, in context,  a horse is an entire male of 5 + years.

Boats/bikes/automobiles are "it", not "she".

Edited by LadyG

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