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Chris Wood

Lister diesel seized

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You're all getting confused with that quaint old village we all used to see road signs for ……

"Loose Chippings".

Edited by zenataomm
Pornography on TV suddenly stopped

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 Back on topic …….. OP needs to go back and read post 7 in this thread.  Then when you've read what Richard was telling you and align it alongside what you last said, along with the admission that the engine and gearbox spent 2 months laying in brackish water. Then what Steamraiser2 said in post number 2 of this thread is the way forward.

I guess the piston at TDC was on the exhaust stroke and allowed the water and crud into the engine through the exhaust port, thus doing the damage on that lung.

 

That there assembly has got to come out, and pulled down in preparation for a ground up restoration. 

Anything else would be papering over the cracks, and the real damage will be done when it fires up.

 

Stop looking for short cuts, get it lifted out and loose thy spanners on it.

 

 

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2 minutes ago, zenataomm said:

I guess the piston at TDC was on the exhaust stroke and allowed the water and crud into the engine through the exhaust port, thus doing the damage on that lung.

 

Ahh, a true follower of the Gods of Dursley

 

OFF-TOPIC. Our BMC in the boat had started to develop a charming 'chuff-chuff' noise with the engine running. It was quite clearly coming from the exhaust. Charming though it was, I new the sound of trouble developing when I heard it

 

Rather than the expected burnt out exhaust valve, it had blown the head gasket between 3 and 4. Presumably the 'chuff' was the sound of combustion in four escaping into 3 at the bottom of the exhaust stroke

 

I thought you might find that entertaining/amusing/whatever

 

Richard

  • Greenie 1

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1 hour ago, RLWP said:

Ahh, a true follower of the Gods of Dursley

 

During the 80s I attended every training course Dursley offered, but then I had to eventually go home to my wife (at the time) oh how I cried.

  • Greenie 2

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22 hours ago, RLWP said:

Ahh, a true follower of the Gods of Dursley

 

OFF-TOPIC. Our BMC in the boat had started to develop a charming 'chuff-chuff' noise with the engine running. It was quite clearly coming from the exhaust. Charming though it was, I new the sound of trouble developing when I heard it

 

Rather than the expected burnt out exhaust valve, it had blown the head gasket between 3 and 4. Presumably the 'chuff' was the sound of combustion in four escaping into 3 at the bottom of the exhaust stroke

 

I thought you might find that entertaining/amusing/whatever

 

Richard

And you went to the cupboard and it was full of lister bits...

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Hello again, many thanks for your continuing interest and ideas about the dormant Lister.

 

Thought these photos might help, the seized piston, caused by water damage has been removed, no sign of any problems with the big end bearings of either cylinders, they move easily. I've pumped out the sump oil, no sign of water, oil looks good as do the main bearings so far as I can see. Have not yet pumped out the gearbox oil, but apart from some minor surface rust, it all looks ok, the forward / astern brake bands seem to work ok & I can rotate the prop shaft ok in neutral.

 

What seems a likely cause of the problem is the flywheel / ring gear where the starter motor fits - this is very corroded. I've taken the advice offered of vinegar treatment & sprayed white malt vinegar through the hole, hoping it reaches the affected parts. Will try the pry bar suggestion in a couple of days when it's had a chance to work.

 

If thats no good, thinking of trying to support the engine & removing the gearbox & bell housing, but this will be tricky as there is a bulkhead in the way.

 

Thanks again

 

Chris  - 01798 867768

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Unusual fan housing. It could be an opposite rotation engine - I can't work out how it was cooled from what is in the pictures

 

Richard

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All this 'taking apart to see' runs counter to a philosophy held by certain other engine development engineers. Their philosophy is 'never take a broken engine apart until you know what is wrong with it'. A philosophy I rather like. 

 

The idea is, by gathering detailed information about the nature of the failure,  the circumstances under which it occurred, and by inspecting the failed engine, an accurate diagnosis of the fault can usually be arrived at.

 

Then you can proceed to take it to bits knowing what needs fixing.

 

 

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Richard,

 

It is water called with a jabsco pump driven by the engine with water jackets in the cylinders & exhaust through which the cooling water is discharged. I suspect that it was this water that corroded the piston, as it was at the top of it's stroke, way above the starter motor level which was the maximum height the bilge water got to. That piston was totally seized, but, strangely there is clearly another major problem as the engine still won't turn - I suspect the flywheel end, but who knows???

 

Regarding rotation, I believe it is right hand as viewed from the front - pulley end, but not now sure I'm remembering correctly!!

 

Many thanks, Chris

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Can you show a picture of the top of the cylinders?

 

And, have you taken the Jabsco pump off?

Edited by RLWP

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30 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

All this 'taking apart to see' runs counter to a philosophy held by certain other engine development engineers. Their philosophy is 'never take a broken engine apart until you know what is wrong with it'. A philosophy I rather like. 

 

The idea is, by gathering detailed information about the nature of the failure,  the circumstances under which it occurred, and by inspecting the failed engine, an accurate diagnosis of the fault can usually be arrived at.

 

Then you can proceed to take it to bits knowing what needs fixing.

 

 

My father told me of how he had a fault on a Triumph motorbike diagnosed by his elderly uncle, who taught physics at Brighton Technical College just after the war. He asked my dad to explain how the engine was supposed to work, and at the end said, “well then the fault must be there”, pointing at the offending part. He was right.

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RLWP,

 

No, I haven't taken the Jabsco off, but can do quite easily, didn't think this could be the problem, but worth a shot.

 

Can also photo the cylinders which have been removed, will do so asap & put on the forum.

 

Thanks, Chris

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11 minutes ago, Chris Wood said:

RLWP,

 

No, I haven't taken the Jabsco off, but can do quite easily, didn't think this could be the problem, but worth a shot.

 

Can also photo the cylinders which have been removed, will do so asap & put on the forum.

 

Thanks, Chris

Just wondering if the Jabsco has seized

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