Jump to content

CNBC & Battery Tech


Featured Posts

Yesterday I saw a clip for a TV programme on CNBC which made reference to a new technology which will be able to accept a charge 1000 times faster than lithium.  It’s broadcast at 10pm on Thursday 7th June and it is called ‘The Edge’.  

May be of interest to some.

Apologies but I just realised I posted about this previously.  Proof if it were ever needed than I have exceptionally poo short term memory.  ?

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Dartagnan said:

Yesterday I saw a clip for a TV programme on CNBC which made reference to a new technology which will be able to accept a charge 1000 times faster than lithium.  It’s broadcast at 10pm on Thursday 7th June and it is called ‘The Edge’.  

May be of interest to some.

Apologies but I just realised I posted about this previously.  Proof if it were ever needed than I have exceptionally poo short term memory.  ?

Sounds like it will be capacitor based

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Dartagnan said:

Yesterday I saw a clip for a TV programme on CNBC which made reference to a new technology which will be able to accept a charge 1000 times faster than lithium.  It’s broadcast at 10pm on Thursday 7th June and it is called ‘The Edge’.  

May be of interest to some.

 

All a bit odd really, as lithium accepts massive charge rates anyway.

 

The limit on charging lithiums is usually all to do with current capacity of the source of the charge, rather than the batteries.

 

And the same limits will apply to any other new type of battery.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In addition, I presume this is going to be aimed at cars, the infrastructure (local as well as the grid it self) won’t be able to cope with filling multiple cars at that rate unless some kind of local storage buffer was implemented.

Edited by Robbo
Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Robbo said:

In addition, I presume this is going to be aimed at cars, the infrastructure (local as well as the grid it self) won’t be able to cope with filling multiple cars at that rate unless some kind of local storage buffer was implemented.

 

Yes. Electric cars are not ubiquitous for want of suitable battery technology, we have that already.

 

It is the charging technology that is missing. 

 

Politicians will be the last to figure this out. 

 

Nobody here needs to watch the telly programme, now I've explained :D

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

Yes. Electric cars are not ubiquitous for want of suitable battery technology, we have that already.

 

It is the charging technology that is missing. 

 

Politicians will be the last to figure this out. 

 

Nobody here needs to watch the telly programme, now I've explained :D

Of course if it has at least the same energy density as lithium the application in devices like mobile phones and all the other gadgets will be good.

Edited by Robbo
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Robbo said:

Of course if it has at least the same energy density as lithium the application in devices like mobile phones and all the other gadgets will make it popular..

 

Yes. My posts in this thread pre-suppose the programme will be about electric car batteries, which is not what the OP says. You are quite right, it would be brilliant to charge my phone at 100A for 0.6 of a second instead of 0.5A for two hours.

 

Edit to add:

 

Ok ok, I got my arithmetic wrong!!

Edited by Mike the Boilerman
Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe that this story is based on the concept of quantum batteries. If instead of moving ions around these are replaced by electronic bits that are either charged or not. Felix Binder, quoted in New Scientist, has shown that if these bits are 'entangled' the amount of energy needed for a full charge scales with the square root of their number and not linearly as in classical batteries, including lithium ones. Apparently this means that a quantum battery with 1 million bits would be fully charged in the same time as a 1000 bit classical battery. I assume that this supposes the same charge acceptance rates. The scaling of this concept to produce a usable battery will take some years however. Regards, HughC.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Does that mean my battery will be both charged and discharged at the same time? :D

 

if I use a smart gauge to monitor it, does it just change the status?

Edited by Robbo
Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, hughc said:

... the amount of energy needed for a full charge scales with the square root of their number and not linearly...

That doesn’t make sense to me. It suggests that you put back less than you take out. That would be the world’s energy problem sorted overnight. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have always believed the old adage that if you think you understand quantum mechanics then you are not studying it deeply enough. In some situations entangled particles will, I am led to believe, when returning from a higher to a lower energy state emit more energy than classical thermodynamics predicts.The difference is very slight but that is all it needs to be. In the long term this will affect every aspect of technology. This does not I think mean that the laws of thermodynamics are wrong only that they deal with the net effect of large numbers of particles. There is a new kid on the block 'quantum thermodynamics' which I find even harder to follow than the classical route. HughC.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.